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The Cheese Iron Scarborough

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  • joss2 Jun 22, 2007 07:49 AM
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I get most of my cheeses at Miccuci's in Portland is there any reason to drive the extra miles to the Cheese Iron - other that the $40 a pound "rare" English stinky cheese I read about in the paper earlier this week?

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  1. I love Miccuci's...however if you are looking for great cheeses and want a huge selection, Cheese Iron is the place. Everyone working there is incredibly knowledgable about cheese and will guide you through the process. They have a huge selection of local artisnal cheese, not just English or French. They also have a huge selections of cured meats, like Prosciutto de Parma, San Danielle, speck, numerous salami's as well as great pate. If you love cheese, you have to go the cheese iron. It is definitely worth the drive.

    1. I haven't been in but I go by often and I noticed that they are advertising "paninis and cold drinks." Are they a restaurant also? I'll have to go in and check them out, though, if the cheese selection is so good. What happened to the cheese shop that was in the Portland Public Market?

      1 Reply
      1. re: laurmb

        Still in Portland
        K. Horton Speicalty Foods
        The Public Market House
        28 Monument Square
        Portland, ME 04101
        (207) 228-2056

        www.khortonfoods.com
        Retail business sporting 150 - 200 types of cheeses from around the world plus domestic Maine cheese, smoked fish from Canada and Maine, meat pates, olives & condiments

      2. Miccuci's in Portland is great for all "Italian" , and their Cheeses respectively, but for more International varieties the Cheese Iron is the place..
        to quote " the $40 a pound "rare" English stinky cheese " , that Dollar amount is questionable !
        Cheeses do not 'stink' , they are odiferous at times.
        But a connoisseur (Fr. connaisseur, from connoistre, connaître meaning "to be acquainted with" or "to know") will find these attributes to cheese, when wafting through an area, rather inviting

        1 Reply
        1. re: Peter B Wolf

          The price quoted in the parer was $9.99 for 4oz. Some stinky cheese!
          ... and thanks for the French lesson!