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Creating a Recipe Book

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I would like to create a Recipe Book for my college age daughter who is moving into her 1st apartment with 7 girls of her favorite recipes (that I cook). Does anyone have any suggestions for an online company that can put together the book? Or any other suggestions for that matter?

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  1. I put together a "cook book" CD for my niece. All family and friends favorite recipes. I took my time doing it but it is so simple for her to pop into her laptop and pull up Joyce's Red Pepper Chutney etc.

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    1. re: Candy

      Candy....would love for you to post Joyce's Red Pepper Chutney recipe....sounds yummy and right up my alley and I amsure mamy others too!

    2. I've done this for friends who were getting married. I used a 3-ring view binder and created a cover page, wrote a separate note on its own page for the wedding couple, had a Table of Contents, and used dividers for each section (Beef, Poultry, Ham/Pork, Lamb, Seafood, Vegetables, Rice/Pasta, Cakes/Cookies, Desserts, Miscellaneous. Each section had about 10-12 recipes, plus plenty of extra pages in each section for them to add to those sections as they found recipes they liked.

      Microsoft Word/Office has templates at Microsoft's website for free download, or if you Google "recipe template" or "cookbook template" you might find something you like.

      OR - if you don't want to use a 3-ring binder, you can create it yourself and bring it to Kinko's or a similar copy place and have them spiral-bind it for you.

      2 Replies
      1. re: LindaWhit

        My solution wasn't nearly as organized or pretty as yours, Linda, but it's been working. I gave my daughters 3-hole punches and binders with some of the basic recipes that they told me they wanted.
        Every time I got one of those "Mom, how do you cook....?" calls or email, I write down the recipe and email it to both daughters, keeping a copy on my own computer for when they inevitably lose track of them. Many times the recipes are for thing I never would have thought to have given them. I can also send them recipes that are old newspaper or magazine clipping, recipes written in my late mother's handwriting, or copies from cookbooks by scanning them into the computer and sending them in pdf form.
        May not be the prettiest recipe book in the world but it all stores on email, in a document file and in the 3-ring binder.

        1. re: MakingSense

          Sounds similiar enough MS! And having the scanned copies of their grandmother's recipes in her own handwriting makes it just that much more special!

      2. I found a recipe binder that is similar to a photo album with rings. Each page has 2 4x6 openings. In one I slid the recipe card with the recipe typed up, and in the opening below it, I put a picture of the dishes that I had pictures for. I gave them as gifts one year, and in subsequent years I've given card and photo updates for it

        The binders came with tab dividers for categories and it had recipe cards if you wanted to write them out, but I typed them. Every now and then I've seen similar binders at Barnes and Noble on the Bargain rack.

        1. there are a few relatively cheap programs you can buy-- "master cook" etc that format your recipes & help with designs, you can move recipes around, put them in different "books" and categorize them by course or cuisine. you can also scale the recipes up and down. the data entry is a bit tedious, but you'll have everything ready to go for the next book you make. you can print the book out in hard copy or keep it on a disc.

          2 Replies
          1. re: soupkitten

            I have MasterCook v. 9.0, and it has a relatively easy Import Assistant if you already have recipes typed up. Haven't played with the Cookbook design at all other than importing recipes into my personal cookbook, and as far as I know, the Export puts them not into a Book format, but just a list of recipes. But it DOES keep them all in one place.

            But I think the OP was looking for a nice looking printed version.

            1. re: LindaWhit

              i've printed out "books" from master cook before: they looked okay, i wasn't crazy about not being able to put more than 1 recipe on a page-- perhaps this has been improved in more current software, but the recipes were legible and had different print options/themes. you can add digital color pictures as well. i made hard printed copies of a teen's vegetarian cookbook and a dessert book, and a soup one, and some others just messing around to practice. i guess they're fine for putting in a 3-ring binder, but as far as "nice looking printed version". . . actual book binding etc? i'd try maybe a scrapbooking site? pricier, for sure--

          2. Try Googling "vanity press." I got 275,000 hits when I did, so I think your answer might be among them. ;)>

            You can also search under "DIY publishing" or "self-publishing."

            Here's a link to TIME magazine's article on them:

            http://www.time.com/time/magazine/art...

            1. I do cookbooks as wedding gifts and also made a big one for my husband's grandson last year after he spent the summer here with us, helping me in the kitchen just about every night. I use Microsoft publisher. I have a little form set up with styles and boxes for ingredients and instructions. It's the easiest thing in the world, including sticking in photos if you want. I either put them in three-ring binders or bind them with the Ibico spiral-binding device that we have in the church office.

              1. When my daughters were engaged about seven years ago my cousin gathered special recipes from friends and family. She organized the recipes into a binder with special recipe cards and dividers which she bought online somewhere. What was really special was that people included their personal cooking/eating memories, with photos of family some including my daughters when they were young, or previous generations. It is really, really unique, and the recipes are the ones that my girls always turn to first.

                1 Reply
                1. re: Mayner

                  My mom took the cookbook I'd put together for Cody and added to it, getting recipes from other relatives and adding many of her mom's recipes, for my cousin's wedding last fall. She added family pictures--including some really old ones a lot of us hadn't ever seen before--and stories, and eventually ended up putting it together for all the cousins. It's a nice treasure.