HOME > Chowhound > Cookware >

Omelette Pan?

d
Dan97526 May 27, 2007 01:53 PM

I've recently started to try to make omelettes using the classic flip-&-fold technique (see Julia or St Jacques). I have only All-Clad stainless, cast iron, and a commercial non-stick pan. Obviously the non-stick was my first choice, but I'm not really a fan of it.

I do have a deBuyer black steel crepe pan that I use just for crepes. However, looking around online recently I found that deBuyer has way more in black steel than just a crepe pan. I love cooking on black steel, and at the price I wouldn't balk at having a pan I use only for omelettes.

Several questions:

Where is a good place to buy deBuyer online? Googling it yields up very few useable hits. And the beBuyer website appears to only be a front splash page.

What size of pan is suitable for 3-egg omelettes? What shape of pan; World Cuisine has what they call their "Lyon-shaped" frypan.

Is the black steel sold by World Cuisine deBuyer or some other manufacturer? I have saw on the board that the WC stuff may be made in China (which I try to avoid), while IIRC deBuyer is made in France.

Thanks, all help is appreciated.

Dan

  1. Click to Upload a photo (10 MB limit)
Delete
  1. a priori RE: Dan97526 May 27, 2007 03:43 PM

    Culinary Direct, JB Prince, Bridge Kitchenware, Broadway Panhandler, Zabar's. All do mail order.

    I purchased my deBuyer pans at Dean and DeLuca, B'way Panhandler and Zabar's. They are really really heavy - I use them as searing pans or high-heat non-stick pans. For eggs I use deBuyer CHOC Series non-stick, which has the same Lyonnaise shape and off-set handles. I'm not endorsing mail order service for any of these places. I've only bought stuff from these places walk-in. All of my deBuyer pans came with a big label that said made in France.

    Lyonnaise pans are shaped like the attached image of one of my deBuyer pans..

     
    4 Replies
    1. re: a priori
      m
      mateo21 RE: a priori Apr 29, 2008 10:54 AM

      Don't mean to high-jack the thread, but a priori, how do you get your skillet seasoned like that? I've been cooking on mine for a few months now and it hasn't gotten nearly as black... do you do a cast-iron style seasoning process? Thanks! I'm also looking for a good place to get more DeBuyer skillets online!

      1. re: mateo21
        paulj RE: mateo21 Apr 29, 2008 11:01 AM

        Yes, it is the same seasoning approach as used with cast iron and steel woks.

        1. re: mateo21
          j
          Jeneric60 RE: mateo21 Apr 20, 2009 05:32 AM

          This website tells you how to season an omelette pan...

          http://www.potshopofboston.com/Omelet...

          1. re: Jeneric60
            b
            BBettinaB RE: Jeneric60 Jun 22, 2010 07:13 PM

            I looked at this site for the pot shop of boston, and again, Julia Child does not seem to recommend the expensive heavy pans. She recommends nonstick which I personally won't use as it's well known that gasses from nonstick cookware can kill birds . . . for me I prefer not to inhale something that can kill a living creature. It was the '60s and nobody knew anything about any dangers. But a much less expensive Calphalon or similar pan with either a polished steel or anodized aluminum finish should do the trick as well. In fact Julia says that an omelet should take around 20 seconds to cook and therefore the heavy expensive pan is unnecessary, and I agree.

      2. j
        jerry i h RE: Dan97526 Jun 1, 2007 09:20 PM

        1) for 3 egg omelette, I prefer 9 or 9 1/2 inches
        2) I am not familiar with DeBuyer
        3) I currently use Calphalon non-stick for eggs. It is good, thick aluminum that cooks evenly and makes perfect omelettes. I also like Berndes.
        4) When I was a breakfast short order cook, we always used Lincoln Wearever pans, and they were great: try www.chefsfirst.com or www.bigtray.com. They are standard, restaurant supply items.

        1. yumyumyogi RE: Dan97526 Apr 29, 2008 09:02 AM

          Sorry, I feel the need to use all caps here: DO NOT, I REPEAT, DO NOT BUY THE WORLD CUISINE "LYON-SHAPED" FRYING PAN! It's crap, and nothing like the heavy-duty De Buyer pans. It's cheaply made and it will never season correctly because I suspect it's actually made of aluminum. I'm tossing this one I just bought from Amazon and will take a priori's advice and check out the De Buyer pans at JB Prince.

          1. paulj RE: Dan97526 Apr 29, 2008 09:19 AM

            My #22 (cm) non-name French crepe pan works great for 2-egg omelettes.
            paulj

            1. Candy RE: Dan97526 Apr 29, 2008 12:32 PM

              I am a fan if Swiss Diamond and their breakfast pan is one I covet. It is good for omelets and crepes. It is on my must buy list. The pan is an especially heavy one and has a sloped side for easy turn outs.

              1. jayt90 RE: Dan97526 Apr 30, 2008 08:56 AM

                There seems to be two camps here: using non-stick or aluminum at medium heat, and the super fast carbon steel method at high heat. I think that is what the OP is getting at. These are both good methods, but produce different omelets. I like the high heat method, hot enough to make ghee smoke, and use cast iron for it, but I would love to get hold of the French steel pan.

                10 Replies
                1. re: jayt90
                  Candy RE: jayt90 Apr 30, 2008 09:37 AM

                  Mauviel exports them to the US. They are not difficult to get.

                  1. re: jayt90
                    j
                    Jeneric60 RE: jayt90 Apr 20, 2009 05:36 AM

                    Hi there. There is a pan called the Original French Chef Omelette Pan that was reviewed in Cooks Illustrated online - where the article said

                    "We also tested a pan made specifically for French omelets, created in 1963 when Julia Child asked The Pot Shop of Boston to design it, and where it is still sold today. Well-constructed of thick, heavy-cast aluminum, which maintains consistent heat, the curving shape and gently sloped sides are ideal for omelets. Time and again it produced flawless omelets that were perfectly golden with a creamy center, but the high price tag is a major drawback."

                    http://www.cooksillustrated.com/equip...

                    1. re: Jeneric60
                      jasimo17 RE: Jeneric60 Jul 14, 2010 09:31 AM

                      I bought an omelette pan from the pot shop of Boston. It was very expensive but so worth it! Perfect omelettes and a very high quality pan.

                      http://www.potshopofboston.com/Omelet...

                      1. re: jasimo17
                        c
                        ChowTO RE: jasimo17 Jul 16, 2010 06:58 AM

                        Hello jasimo17,i'm looking at these omelette pans from the pot shop of boston..which pan did you purchase,non stick black,shiny finish,raw finish?..are they made in the USA?..how are they for cooking sunny side up eggs,scrambled?

                        1. re: ChowTO
                          m
                          MacGuffin RE: ChowTO Feb 9, 2011 01:11 PM

                          I bit the bullet and bought an 8" natural sand finish pan today; it was a toss-up between it and the high-polish but Vince (the owner) said that due to its porosity, the natural finish seasons better. I'll report once I've used it--I plan to use rice bran oil to season it because of its very high smoke point and relatively neutral flavor.

                          1. re: ChowTO
                            jasimo17 RE: ChowTO Feb 9, 2011 01:57 PM

                            Hey there. I missed your note, apologies. I bought the non stick. It is great. But maybe I should have gone for the natural finish (see MacGruffin's comment below).

                            So now that we have our pans sorted, does anyone have a really good technique? My Julia cookbook say to use high heat and cook a very short time. But when I try to do this, I end up with a fried omelette, not at all like I had expected. :-(

                            1. re: ChowTO
                              jasimo17 RE: ChowTO Feb 9, 2011 01:59 PM

                              PS. I am not sure they are made in the USA. I bought some other things from the Pot Shop (custard cups and pie plates) and was VERY upset to learn that they were made in China. It really pissed me off as I thought I was spending so much money to help support New England industry.

                              1. re: jasimo17
                                m
                                MacGuffin RE: jasimo17 Feb 9, 2011 02:17 PM

                                They're definitely made here--scroll to the very bottom: http://societyoffrenchchefomeletteers... . The reason the cups and pie plates (and bean pots, etc.) aren't made here anymore is because the factories no longer exist. Coincidentally, I had a discussion with Vince about this very thing--the subject of Peoria came up and he mentioned that he used to contract through a factory near there that's gone. It's not that they don't want to manufacture here, it's that they can't. :(
                                Did you watch John Bennett's video clip on the Pot Shop Web site? Also, there's a nice clip of Julia Child on YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LWmvfU... ; she seems to be dissing a PSOB pan (although it could be a knockoff). Vince told me that he had a falling out with her producer which is why she stopped endorsing the pan. However, he had nothing but the nicest things to say about J.C. herself.

                                1. re: MacGuffin
                                  jasimo17 RE: MacGuffin Feb 9, 2011 02:29 PM

                                  I just watched the video (LOVE). Now I want the status pan. :-)

                                  1. re: jasimo17
                                    m
                                    MacGuffin RE: jasimo17 Feb 9, 2011 02:55 PM

                                    LOL, well, if she's indeed dissing the PSOB pan, you have it in non-stick! Seriously, though, an omelette's pretty easy even without a fancy pan. I've always made them the way Chef Bennett does it--picking up what's cooked to let the raw eggs make contact with the pan. You probably just need some visuals and I'll bet you'll soon be whipping up perfect omelettes. :)

                      2. j
                        Jeneric60 RE: Dan97526 Apr 20, 2009 05:31 AM

                        I found this article online which may be of help...

                        Since 1959 the Pot Shop has been manufacturing, distributing, and selling Boston's only "Official" Boston Baked Bean Pots, The Original French Chef Omelette Pans and other fine cookware and tableware. Back in the beginning, the Pot Shop maintained retail stores in and around the greater Boston area. While we no longer operate retail stores, our products are available here on this website as well as in fine kitchenware and gift stores across the country.

                        For over 45 years the French Chef Omelette pan has churned out delicious omelettes and will continue to do so for generations to come. This pan was recently reviewed in the January 2009 issue of Cooks Illustrated magazine where it was noted that the pan was "Well-constructed of thick, heavy-cast aluminum, which maintains consistent heat, the curving shape and gently sloped sides are ideal for omelets. Time and again it produced flawless omelets that were perfectly golden with a creamy center..."

                        History of The French Chef Omelette Pan

                        A true omelette pan is made of extremely thick cast aluminum. It is this massive amount of metal which allows the pan to be preheated to a very high temperature before tossing in the butter or other shortening for quick transfer of heat to the egg mixture, which then results in the perfect omelette - done in two minutes or less.

                        In the early 1940's, a Midwestern U.S.A. cast aluminum foundry manufactured torpedoes for the U.S. Navy. The front end of the torpedo shell was cut off, so as to allow the explosives, etc., to be inserted. That same front end was approximately 8-11 inches in diameter and shaped like a skillet with shallow sloping, sides. This surplus end piece was simply stock piled in the foundry yard. At some point in the late forties or early 1950's, someone recognized the extraordinary cooking capabilities of the surplus pieces and affixed a handle. They made wonderful omelette pans and were distributed through restaurant supply companies as there were no gourmet kitchenware stores in existence at that time.

                        Later in the 1950's, the Midwestern foundry stopped making torpedoes , and the surplus pieces no longer were available. In 1962, Julia Child, who was just getting started as a television personality, visited the Pot Shop in Boston, one of the finer gourmet kitchenware stores in the USA. She told the torpedo story to the Pot Shop management and suggested that they develop a similar heavy cast aluminum omelette pan, since none were then available. Four months later the first FRENCH CHEF OMELETTE PAN that was created by the Pot Shop was given to Julia Child at her home in Cambridge, where she used it to prepare an omelette lunch for Pot Shop management. As an educator in the field of public broadcasting, she could not officially endorse the omelette pan or any other product.

                        Customer Testimonial for One of the Greatest Gifts to Span Generations...The Original French Chef Omelette Pan

                        Dear Pot Shop:

                        I was delighted to learn you are still making the French Chef Omelette Pan. I was given one as a gift in the early 1960s and have been doing Sunday omelettes for my grandchildren for many, many years. They think the wonderful omelettes are my doing, but I know it's the wonderful pan.

                        I now plan to present each of my seven grandchildren, who are now young adults, with a French Chef Omelette Pan this Christmas.

                        Mrs. George F
                        Corpus Christi, Texas

                        The Pot Shop has manufactured the FRENCH CHEF OMELETTE PAN ever since that time. For decades in the kitchenware industry, suppliers have called any pan an omelette pan and it would appear that the market is saturated with low end imitations. However, many of these suppliers have eventually stopped production. There is only one Original FRENCH CHEF OMELETTE PAN and countless people all across the nation know that it is made by The Pot Shop of Boston . Please visit our website at http://www.potshopofboston.com and read our customer testimonials and you'll be convinced as well.

                        The Pot Shop of Boston is a family owned and operated business that was established in 1959. This retailer is most noted for the creation of The Original French Chef Omelette Pan with Julia Child as well as the Official Boston Baked Bean Pot. HTTP://www.potshopofboston.com

                        6 Replies
                        1. re: Jeneric60
                          b
                          BBettinaB RE: Jeneric60 Jun 22, 2010 07:54 PM

                          I hate hype. And I think I smell exactly that in the ubiquitous pot shop of boston messages popping up all over the place. All I can say is, watch Julia Child's omelet party episode and see for yourselves.

                          1. re: BBettinaB
                            c
                            ChowTO RE: BBettinaB Jul 16, 2010 07:00 AM

                            I don't smell anything..looks like some good quality long lasting thick pans.

                            1. re: ChowTO
                              m
                              MacGuffin RE: ChowTO Jan 22, 2011 05:30 PM

                              I don't smell anything either. They've been doing the same pans for a very long time and I plan to fit one into my budget at some point. Watch the demo by John Bennett on the Pot Shop of Boston Web site.

                              1. re: MacGuffin
                                b
                                BBettinaB RE: MacGuffin Jan 23, 2011 03:52 PM

                                LOL Watch the episode and then decide. However long they've been doing the pans is meaningless if it isn't the right tool for the job.

                                1. re: BBettinaB
                                  m
                                  MacGuffin RE: BBettinaB Jan 23, 2011 06:55 PM

                                  I'm not quite sure how this possibly can't be "the right tool for the job," but hey, you're entitled to your opinion (I'd have to agree had you or anyone else claimed that it was "the only tool for the job" but I'm not seeing that, nor am I seeing any "ubiquitous messages popping up"--I had to look for this). My point was that these things, i.e., hype-heavy scams, generally get lost by the wayside instead of continuing to be manufactured and sold, largely by word of mouth, for 40+ years. The odds just don't favor that many people being stupid enough to spend that much money on what turns out to be a POS without word getting out, especially given access to the WWW. And John Bennett is not only a highly respected chef but I doubt very much that he got paid to do that video demo with a pan he's had since 1963.

                          2. re: Jeneric60
                            kaleokahu RE: Jeneric60 Jan 22, 2011 08:09 PM

                            Hi, Jericho60: How thick is that 'ol torpedo pan?

                          3. John E. RE: Dan97526 Jan 23, 2011 11:38 AM

                            The best omelet pan is a ten inch nonstick pan. Omelets are not cooked over high heat so no dangerous gases will be released.

                            1 Reply
                            1. re: John E.
                              tanuki soup RE: John E. Jan 23, 2011 03:47 PM

                              Agree. I have a dedicated nonstick omelet pan. I would only add that aluminum is better than stainless steel due to the more even heat distribution.

                            2. tim irvine RE: Dan97526 Feb 9, 2011 03:19 PM

                              I agree that nonstick is the way to go, but to me the only way to go in the nonstick genre is a well-seasoned DeBuyer or comparable steel that gets wiped but never washed...

                              4 Replies
                              1. re: tim irvine
                                m
                                MacGuffin RE: tim irvine Feb 9, 2011 04:02 PM

                                Isn't that "seasoned" rather than "non-stick?"

                                1. re: MacGuffin
                                  Chemicalkinetics RE: MacGuffin Feb 9, 2011 04:26 PM

                                  A bit of a jab, man.

                                  1. re: MacGuffin
                                    Politeness RE: MacGuffin Feb 9, 2011 04:39 PM

                                    MacGuffin: "Isn't that 'seasoned' rather than 'non-stick?'"

                                    Ecclesiastes 3:1. There is a season for everything, a time for every occupation under heaven.

                                    1. re: Politeness
                                      Chemicalkinetics RE: Politeness Feb 9, 2011 04:41 PM

                                      very funny.

                                2. tim irvine RE: Dan97526 Feb 9, 2011 04:06 PM

                                  Well, when I make an omelette nothing sticks.

                                  1 Reply
                                  1. re: tim irvine
                                    m
                                    MacGuffin RE: tim irvine Feb 9, 2011 04:20 PM

                                    I think "non-stick" refers to coating a cooking surface with something, e.g., Teflon: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Non-stic... . Jasimo17 bought a pan coated with a non-stick surface: http://www.potshopofboston.com/bfc8ns... .

                                  2. z
                                    zeusbheld RE: Dan97526 May 13, 2012 11:43 PM

                                    my next omelet pan will be ONLY for omelets and used ONLY by me (and if anyone dares lay their mitts on it i'll break their grubby little fingers, even the cat).

                                    I like the shape of the Boston Julia Child pan (she apparently had a hand in creating it), but i have to have induction-compatible (condo's rules, no gas). I didn't see a de Buyer that didn't have steep sides. i'd prefer a pan with shallower sides, but steep enough to aid in 'rolling' the omelet like the Boston pan (and not like a griddle pan). Anyone know of any that are induction-compatible?

                                    37 Replies
                                    1. re: zeusbheld
                                      kaleokahu RE: zeusbheld May 14, 2012 08:05 AM

                                      Mauviel has a line of induction-capable (bonded disk bottom) aluminum non-stick pans you might like.

                                      1. re: zeusbheld
                                        m
                                        MacGuffin RE: zeusbheld May 14, 2012 09:52 AM

                                        Should circumstances ever allow you ever go for the Boston pan (which she subsequently trashed in her "omelette" installment, possibly because her producer got into a snit with its manufacturer), go for the larger one. The smaller one has a much smaller surface area on the bottom than one would imagine and because the sides are so shallow (fabulous slope, though), one has to be a bit careful doing a Julia- or Jacques-style classic omelette, especially if using three eggs. Regardless, it's a great pan; I just wish I'd bought the bigger one. And yeah, I use it ONLY for omelettes so I know just where you're coming from although good luck getting the feline to cooperate (I have three).

                                        That 9.4" Mauviel looks like a nice pan for omelettes (I'm always tempted to think of you as "taleotahu," though).

                                        1. re: MacGuffin
                                          kaleokahu RE: MacGuffin May 14, 2012 03:36 PM

                                          Hi, MacGuffin:

                                          Good advice. Maybe I missed it, but what finish is your Boston pan?

                                          Then it shall be "Talofa" for you. You have to have spent time on Kaua'i West Side or Ni'ihau to throw those Ts around.

                                          Talofa,
                                          Taleo

                                          1. re: kaleokahu
                                            m
                                            MacGuffin RE: kaleokahu May 14, 2012 07:36 PM

                                            You didn't miss it because I didn't post it--I went with the sand finish but there's a side of me that always wanted to go for the high-polish (which is considerably more expensive). What I'd like to have to complement my pan is the larger pan with the high-polish finish. I seasoned my smaller pan according to the (included) manufacturer's instructions; I chose rice bran oil for its very high smoke point and because it's cheap (it's what I used on my de Buyer pans as well). It turned out to have been a perfect choice because my pans have never stuck, even before developing the seasoning that comes with continued use.

                                            I wish I could get my hands on the prototype of the pan--Julia uses it for making omelettes during the last part of her omelette show when she's demonstrating how easy it is to do omelettes to-order for lots of guests. It's rather a different animal than the one being sold now--it really looks like it was military surplus.

                                            My right to throw the t's around is solely based on my having read "Hawaii" in my youth. :)

                                            1. re: MacGuffin
                                              kaleokahu RE: MacGuffin May 14, 2012 08:18 PM

                                              Hi, Mac:

                                              So now this is getting interesting... How did the "prototype" differ from what's sold now? And are either of those two the same as the original, which I read were sawn-off submarine torpedo casings from WW2 production?

                                              Ah, that Michener, he really tried. Amazing study of his subjects. Right won.

                                              Talofa,
                                              Taleo

                                              1. re: kaleokahu
                                                j
                                                jljohn RE: kaleokahu May 14, 2012 08:40 PM

                                                Kaleo,

                                                See the video here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rmt4YB...

                                                At 2:12 she shows what looks like the current pan (apparently it was current then also)--she refers to it as the "status pan." However, at 23:40, she uses two identical, earlier pans she calls "early status pans." They look less polished, less sculpted, and more rustic--bolted together instead of shaped or cast to include the handle (the current pan has no rivets, whereas the early pan did).

                                                1. re: jljohn
                                                  m
                                                  MacGuffin RE: jljohn May 14, 2012 09:07 PM

                                                  Spot on! You can start to see them at about 23:00, though; pause the video to have a good look. I wish they'd stayed like that--I REALLY like them. And see what I mean about their looking as though they really had been military surplus? Really beautiful slope on those pans--I've yet to see anything like them anywhere. They're PERFECT (and observe they're larger than the current crop of 8" Boston pans). And they're also much smoother in appearance than the sand-finish pans.

                                                  1. re: MacGuffin
                                                    kaleokahu RE: MacGuffin May 15, 2012 08:32 AM

                                                    Jeremy & Mac:

                                                    Are you guys sure the "non-status" pans were the original or prototype Boston pans made from torpedoes? They look to have thermoplastic handles, and they look larger to me than the "status" pan, which is obviously a Boston pan.

                                                    Also, it's been awhile since I looked at the Boston Pan website, but don't they offer the same bright polished finish?

                                                    Classic video, thanks!

                                                    [T]Aloh/fa,
                                                    Kaleo

                                                    1. re: kaleokahu
                                                      j
                                                      jljohn RE: kaleokahu May 15, 2012 09:38 AM

                                                      Kaleo,

                                                      I have no idea if the "early status pan" was made by the pot shop. Spurred by this thread, I had watched the omelette episode only minutes before you asked about what Mac called the "prototype," so I was easily able to pinpoint them for anyone who was interested.

                                                      I agree that those look like thermoplastic handles. And I agree with Mac that I like the look of those two pans more than the Pot Shop's current pans. The Pot Shop offer 3 finishes: a black non-stick, a highly polished finish like the one she shows and does not use (and repeatedly disses), and an unpolished/cast one that is much rougher or coarser looking the "early status pan" in the video. I believe Mac was comparing the current unpolished/cast to the "early" pan in the video, and the "early" pan appears much smoother, yet not polished, finish.

                                                      When Vince tells the story of the creation of the prototype, he talks about it in the singular, so I wonder that pair might be from another manufacturer.

                                                      1. re: jljohn
                                                        kaleokahu RE: jljohn May 15, 2012 01:23 PM

                                                        Hi, Jeremy:

                                                        I like the look of the mystery pans better, too, but I'm not sure they would work any better or worse than the 10" version of the Boston pan. I like that the handle of the latter is wood, but I'm not crazy for the way it was turned.

                                                        I get the sense from various anecdotes that Ms. Child could be a little cranky at times. She did not suffer fools gladly, that's for sure. I watched the whole vid you linked, but did not hear her diss the pan, other than to call it the "status pan" and then not use it. How--other than that--did she diss it? In another episode or book?

                                                        Aloha,
                                                        Kaleo

                                                        1. re: kaleokahu
                                                          j
                                                          jljohn RE: kaleokahu May 15, 2012 01:57 PM

                                                          Kaleo,

                                                          I am responding with what I remember from watching it last night. To some extent, I am reading between the lines, but keep in mind that the status pan is a pan she helped to design and then used as her omelette pan for some time. With this background in mind, her comments to the effect that the walls were too short, that the pan was too thick, and that the "early status pan" cost roughly half of the "expensive" current status pan strike me as 'dissing." I doubt that use of the status pan was widespread enough among her viewers to merit her singling it out and criticizing it as she did. She could have simply said that she like the light non-stick pan best. Her criticism of the status pans thickness and wall height further indicates a "diss" to me in light of her using, and commenting favorably regarding, "early status pans" that appear to be very similar, geometrically, to the current pans.

                                                          1. re: jljohn
                                                            m
                                                            MacGuffin RE: jljohn May 15, 2012 03:57 PM

                                                            My impression was that she had no problem with the thickness of the pan (love that) but rather its high price and shallow sides (she had a point there although it's not as much of an issue as she'd have you believe). It seems likely she also preferred the pan she'd actually helped develop (i.e. the two prototypes) and didn't care for the subsequent modifications and price hike. Vince, a real character, told me that he and J.C.'s producer, one Ruth Lockwood, locked horns over her habit of buying stuff and subsequently insisting on returning it (I hadn't seen "The Omelette Show" at that point). So I suspect this also helped fuel the dissing although no one will ever know for sure (she makes another rather snarky remark at about 13:30). You will observe, though, that Child made use of the prototypes at the end and they sure looked ideal for the task at hand. That's exactly the kind of pan I'd like to have--I think it's beautiful. Regardless, my 8" sand-finish pan makes great omelettes. I agree with taleo that the current 10" high-polish pans are closer to the original pans than are any of the others currently being offered for sale by Vince--had I seen "The Omelette Show," I'd probably have shelled out for it, dis or no dis.

                                                        2. re: jljohn
                                                          m
                                                          MacGuffin RE: jljohn May 15, 2012 04:04 PM

                                                          "I believe Mac was comparing the current unpolished/cast to the 'early' pan in the video, and the 'early' pan appears much smoother, yet not polished, finish."

                                                          Spot on again and "talofa" to taleo. :) The early pans seem neither rough nor highly polished.
                                                          My guess is that there were probably more than one of the original style made after the very first one Vince mentions. I wonder if anyone could get a straight answer out of him?

                                                2. re: MacGuffin
                                                  omotosando RE: MacGuffin Jul 1, 2013 12:01 AM

                                                  Hi MacGuffin. Are you still wishing that you had gotten the high polish pan? I was going to order the smaller pan, but based on your review, I will go with the larger pan. I just can't make up my mind between the polished and the natural. The polished looks so nice, but the sand seems more practical . . .

                                                  1. re: omotosando
                                                    m
                                                    MacGuffin RE: omotosando Jul 1, 2013 03:29 AM

                                                    Yes, I kind of wish I'd gone HP and larger. I'm now going to let you in on a dirty little secret: I found the Rudolph Stanish pan on eBay and in some ways I like it better and would like to pick up the larger version. The only reason I prefer it is because it's noticeably deeper than the Pot Shop's pan, which means you can agitate it more à la Julia or Jacques (I use both methods) without having to worry about spilling the eggs. It's much lighter in weight than the Pot Shop's pan although it's not by any means a light gauge. If you make country-style omelettes that don't involve shaking the pan, it doesn't really matter if the pan's shallow.

                                                    1. re: MacGuffin
                                                      omotosando RE: MacGuffin Jul 1, 2013 10:31 AM

                                                      MacGuffin, thanks so much! I just went on Ebay and bought a yellow Rudolph Stanish pan for $30. It's the smaller size - someone else was selling the larger size in brown, but yellow is the accent color for all my kitchen stuff, so the yellow it was.

                                                      I think I will work on perfecting my omelette making skills in that pan and if I find I am making enough omelettes, then perhaps I will also spring for the larger Pot Shop of Boston high polished pan.

                                                      Did you season your Rudolph Stanish pan and, if so, how?

                                                      1. re: omotosando
                                                        kaleokahu RE: omotosando Jul 1, 2013 11:02 AM

                                                        Hi, omotosando:

                                                        I think you might have bought one of the later Stanish pans. Club made at least two under Stanish's name. The later ones were a little thinner and painted, with phenolic handles. The earlier ones were very thick bare aluminum, with a restaurant-style steel handle.

                                                        Does yours have two painted and indented rings on the bottom and a large "Club" in the center? Or does it say "The Rudolph Stanish Pan for Omelets" in cursive on a smooth bottom? You can compare yours with mine which is pictured here: http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/875513 I'd be interested to know how thick your pan is, if you can measure.

                                                        To "season", clean the pan really well and dry thoroughly. Heat on low heat for a minute or two, then add enough oil to fill the floor of the pan about 1/8 inch deep. Wipe the oil up onto the sides with a paper towel. You want to let the heat come up to just BELOW the smoke point of the oil. If you see little "tears" and runnels of oil runing down the sides, just wipe around with your paper towel. You can use a slurry of oil and kosher salt to do the same thing. Then you take the pan off the heat and let it cool overnight. In the morning, wipe it out thoroughly, and you're good to go.

                                                        If you see smoke, it's too late--the oil is polymerizing into a sticky gunk. This happens first on the walls where the runnels form, so watch carefully. If you blow it, no big deal, just strip it completely and start over. An IR thermometer gun makes this part easy. Then don't wash it ever again, just scrub out with oil and kosher salt.

                                                        Aloha,
                                                        Kaleo

                                                        PS The pan's "seasoning" lasts a lot longer if you always use salted butter, why I don't know.

                                                        1. re: kaleokahu
                                                          omotosando RE: kaleokahu Jul 1, 2013 11:23 AM

                                                          Here is a link to the pan I bought. http://www.ebay.com/itm/Vintage-Yello... I believe it is one of the later ones since it is painted yellow and has the phenolic handle.

                                                          Hopefully it will work out okay. How do I measure the thickness?

                                                          1. re: omotosando
                                                            kaleokahu RE: omotosando Jul 1, 2013 12:30 PM

                                                            Hi, omotosando:

                                                            If you don't have a caliper or micrometer, I'd just stack a few pennies together and hold 'em next to the rim. A U.S. penny is 1.55mm thick, so # of pennies times 1.55 equals the rim thickness. Anything >4mm is pretty darn good for aluminum.

                                                            If you like omelets, I recommend Chef Stanish's small book, "Omelets, Crepes, and Other Recipes" (Harbor Press, 1970).

                                                            Aloha,
                                                            Kaleo

                                                            1. re: kaleokahu
                                                              m
                                                              MacGuffin RE: kaleokahu Jul 9, 2013 04:52 PM

                                                              Talofa, Tareo. Just wanted to thank you for your Stanish book recommendation. I picked up a very nice hardcover copy on Amazon and am enjoying it very much (as you know, there's more than omelettes to be found). He always struck me as a sweet guy and the book reinforces my hunch. I think I now have the ultimate trio of omelette cookbooks. :))

                                                            2. re: omotosando
                                                              m
                                                              MacGuffin RE: omotosando Jul 1, 2013 02:23 PM

                                                              That's the one! And lucky you to get it in yellow (I think they used to call it "harvest gold")--mine's hideous '70s "avocado." I'd call the thickness 0.5 cm. I've never experienced sticking when making a classic omelette in it and as I mentioned, it's deeper than my more expensive pan and similarly lacks any sharp angles. Tareo, how do you like yours?

                                                              BTW, Tareo's right about holding the oil below the smoke point. I use rice bran oil these days for seasoning--its high smoke point is very non-temperamental.

                                                              1. re: MacGuffin
                                                                kaleokahu RE: MacGuffin Jul 1, 2013 03:18 PM

                                                                Talofa, Mac:

                                                                I'm liking mine a lot, but making fewer omelets lately for some reason. Wahine reached for it last night AAMOF--to fry bacon--and so we had to have a little talk...

                                                                Talofa,
                                                                Tareo

                                                                1. re: kaleokahu
                                                                  m
                                                                  MacGuffin RE: kaleokahu Jul 1, 2013 04:17 PM

                                                                  ROTFLMAO! ...and I have to tell ya, that's one gorgeous pan. I wasn't even aware that there'd been an earlier incarnation of the Stanish pans. I'll keep my eye out for it. (Do you know if a 10" was made?) I saw the 10" pan omoto mentioned but I'm always looking for bargains (mine was pretty cheap) and it was a bit too pricey. Despite having the eggs and the "bought specifically for that purpose" raw milk French Emmental in the fridge, I haven't been making omelettes either of late. Maybe it's too hot. And BTW, I've seen the little Stanish book offered; since you recommend it, I'll pick one up.

                                                                  1. re: MacGuffin
                                                                    omotosando RE: MacGuffin Jul 1, 2013 04:22 PM

                                                                    Raw milk emmental? Where can I buy some? Sounds wonderful. Do they ship?

                                                                    1. re: omotosando
                                                                      m
                                                                      MacGuffin RE: omotosando Jul 1, 2013 07:15 PM

                                                                      I buy it locally at Fairway in NYC. I'd think any cheese store would have it.

                                                                2. re: MacGuffin
                                                                  omotosando RE: MacGuffin Jul 1, 2013 04:14 PM

                                                                  Hi MacGuffin. I'm curious if you always use butter when you make the omelette in the pan, or if you ever substitute oil -- i.e., will the pan hold its nonstick coating better if I only use butter rather than oil for omelettes?

                                                                  By the way, speaking of rice bran oil, two weeks ago I made salmon in a pan using cheap rice bran oil and last night I made the same salmon with expensive olive oil, and the rice bran oil was the clear winner as far as flavor (I guess because it didn't interfere with the salmon flavor, while the olive oil flavor was actually a bit off-putting). Wonder how my omelettes would be with rice bran oil to keep them from sticking?

                                                                  1. re: omotosando
                                                                    m
                                                                    MacGuffin RE: omotosando Jul 1, 2013 07:14 PM

                                                                    Always butter for omelettes. In fact, I get even nicer results using a European-type butter. :)

                                                                  2. re: MacGuffin
                                                                    omotosando RE: MacGuffin Jul 3, 2013 01:34 PM

                                                                    My Rudolph Stanish pan arrived today from the Ebay seller, and it's a beaut. Looks almost brand new and I love, love, the retro "harvest gold" yellow color. Tonight I season per Kaleo's instructions and I celebrate the 4th of July with omelettes.

                                                                    1. re: omotosando
                                                                      m
                                                                      MacGuffin RE: omotosando Jul 3, 2013 03:10 PM

                                                                      I'm so excited for you and am happy you trusted my recommendation! Please post your impressions of its performance. I took Tareo's recommendation and found what's supposed to be a hardcover copy of the Stanish book through Amazon in nice condition at a decent price; it's on its way. Two books that I recommend if you can find them at a fair price are Narcissa G. Chamberlain's The Omelette Book (bought from The Pot Shop) and Madame Romaine de Lyon's The Art of Cooking Omelettes. Be aware that sellers are asking RIDICULOUS prices for the latter; it literally took me years to find a copy at a price I was willing to pay (which turned out to be <$20 with shipping, just a few months ago). Both books are not only helpful but are delightful reads as well.

                                                                      1. re: MacGuffin
                                                                        omotosando RE: MacGuffin Jul 4, 2013 05:21 PM

                                                                        Hi MacGuffin. Well, I inaugurated the Stanish pan today.

                                                                        First, the good. I seasoned it exactly as Kaleo instructed and it was magic -- I never seen something as non-stick since Teflon, which I abandoned a number of years ago after reading about the health concerns. People are always raving about their cast iron and how cast iron is just like Teflon, but I have never had cast iron be as non stick as this pan.

                                                                        Now for the bad, which I think has to do with my poor omelette making skills. I must have gotten the pan too hot because the second I put the butter in, the butter browned, and the second I put the egg in, the omelette itself browned. Literally, within a second. And that was before I had time to flip it and melt the cheese filling. So I ended up with a very overcooked, but still edible, omelette. But not the fluffy, wonderful, tender omelette I was looking for.

                                                                        I definitely need some of those omelette cooking books you recommended, or even better, I wish I could find a cooking class solely devoted to omelets since I suspect that this is the kind of thing where hands-on instruction would be helpful.

                                                                        By the way, how do you clean the bottom of the pan? I love this pan so much that i want to keep the bottom looking nice, without disturbing my seasoning. I have been given to understand that you should never wash the omelette pan, but merely wipe it out and rub with a bit of salt. But I want the bottom to look nice, so I can hang it from my pot rack.

                                                                        I will keep trying as far as making omelettes.

                                                                        By the way, how do you think this pan would be for making pancakes? I understand that an egg pan should only be used for eggs, but i was thinking of trying to acquire a second one for pancakes. I love, love the non-stick qualities of this pan.

                                                                        1. re: omotosando
                                                                          m
                                                                          MacGuffin RE: omotosando Jul 4, 2013 06:44 PM

                                                                          I wouldn't use the pan for anything except omelettes, especially since the bottom isn't really flat enough to do justice to other things, e.g. pancakes. And just imagine how impressed your friends will be when they see you have a dedicated omelette pan (especially when you develop the knack of making really good ones)! I don't hang my pans so really don't bother too much with the undersides (if I did, I'd never have bought "avocado green"). Inside...well, after the pan cools down, I wipe it down with a paper towel until next time. It never needs more than that.

                                                                          As to your semi-disaster, I suggest, in addition to those books, watching Jacques Pépin's omelette technique on YouTube. Julia's is great, too, but it's almost impossible to use her "rolled" technique in a pan this small, which is why I'd like to get my hands on the 10" (or a de Buyer Carbone Plus lyonnaise pan of similar size); more surface area on the bottom is needed than is supplied by 8" pans. You need about 8" on the bottom, not across the top. Pay attention to the butter while it melts--it might be safer to put it in the pan before you start to heat it on a high-ish but not super-high flame (or level). You need to swirl the butter to coat the sides of the pan and when you see it stop foaming, it's time to add the eggs. Try to learn the classic scrambled technique. It's in Julia's The French Chef Cookbook, as well as in Madame's and Narcissa's books, and makes a gorgeous, delicious omelette although to tell you the truth, I prefer the rolled ones despite their being a little less attractive (they get a good going over in From Julia Child's Kitchen). Both techniques take a little practice but I promise they're doable--you just need a bigger pan for the rolled variety.

                                                                3. re: kaleokahu
                                                                  omotosando RE: kaleokahu Jul 5, 2013 09:56 PM

                                                                  Hi Kaleo. Thank you so much for the seasoning advice. Worked like a charm - completely nonstick.

                                                                  I am currently bidding on Ebay on a cast aluminum electric skillet. I remember such things fondly from my childhood and decided to try to acquire one. If I should win the auction, should I season the skillet just as I seasoned the Stanish aluminum skillet? Also, for the electric skillet, what temperature would you suggest for seasoning? i just can't believe how nonstick my Stanish is after seasoning, so now I am eager to season other aluminum.

                                                                  1. re: omotosando
                                                                    kaleokahu RE: omotosando Jul 6, 2013 07:34 AM

                                                                    Hi, omotosando:

                                                                    You're very welcome. It's an epiphany the first time you shake one of these pans and the omelet just completely breaks friction, isn't it? A dirty little secret is that this "seasoning" method works pretty well with all linings, albeit not as well as with aluminum and not lasting as long.

                                                                    I think seasoning the electric skillet is a workable idea. I'd do it the same way: just below the oil's smoke point. But if you'll be using it for things besides eggs and crepes, e.g., using it as the food gods intended--for fried chicken--it won't be/stay very non-stick. So you might end up concluding that it's too much trouble to "reseason" after every batch of fried chicken, bacon, etc. But if you do it, please report your results. If it lasts, you could make a lot of people very happy.

                                                                    Aloha,
                                                                    Kaleo

                                                      2. re: MacGuffin
                                                        f
                                                        fingermark RE: MacGuffin May 31, 2012 04:32 PM

                                                        MacGuffin, How are you liking the Boston pan? I honestly can't decide? Nice aluminum + non-stick (like the Mauviel), cheap non-stick, Boston, carbon-steel + seasoned?

                                                        1. re: fingermark
                                                          m
                                                          MacGuffin RE: fingermark May 31, 2012 07:54 PM

                                                          I love it BUT in hindsight I'd go with the larger of the two pans (and if I were really flush, I'd go for the polished finish. I have a serious aversion to non-stick, so that's out for me. If I were to make a second choice, I'd look for a carbon steel de Buyer pan but I don't think they have the beautiful sloping sides of the Boston pans.

                                                          1. re: MacGuffin
                                                            f
                                                            fingermark RE: MacGuffin Jun 1, 2012 08:47 AM

                                                            I wanted something more versatile, so I wound up buying the MStone2 Aluminum Frying Pan (9.4"). I have no idea if it's going to work or not. I too have a coiled stove. I'll let you know next week if I regret it or not. p.s., I pulled the buy button trigger before I saw your reply. I likely would have gone w/ the Boston. I just wanted to try something I don't have to season. My cast iron pan needs to be re-seasoned and I keep putting it off, though it's likely easy.

                                                            1. re: fingermark
                                                              m
                                                              MacGuffin RE: fingermark Jun 1, 2012 12:14 PM

                                                              FWIW, the seasoning process was a piece of cake. I followed the included instructions exactly and not once has it stuck. BTW, the pan still works great on coils. Better coils than glass, which wouldn't allow me to make a Julia- or Jacques-style omelette. Consider yourself lucky under the circumstances! :)

                                                              If you want to get really persnickety, you can always return the MStone2 unused... ;)

                                                    2. j
                                                      jljohn RE: Dan97526 May 15, 2012 04:53 AM

                                                      After all this omelette pan talk, and after watching Julia's omelette episode last night, I felt the need to start the day by making 8 French omelettes. (for 5 of us--I did not eat all 8!). The 10" debuyer mineral pan did a great job, and it's only lightly seasoned (roughly 8 weeks of frying eggs and making grilled cheese about once a week.). I don't see a need for another pan, and it's fairly inexpensive and will last longer than any of us (unlike anything nonstick).

                                                      1. j
                                                        jljohn RE: Dan97526 May 15, 2012 04:59 AM

                                                        Regarding the best place to buy--I got mine at chefs.com. I picked up the 8", 10", and 12" mineral set. It's a good price for all three if you are interested. I highly recommend the set if you use various sized frying pans and don't want to touch nonstick.

                                                        3 Replies
                                                        1. re: jljohn
                                                          m
                                                          MacGuffin RE: jljohn May 15, 2012 05:25 AM

                                                          I'm partial to the Blue Force line. :)

                                                          1. re: MacGuffin
                                                            Chemicalkinetics RE: MacGuffin May 15, 2012 01:35 PM

                                                            I have Force Blue. It is pretty good.

                                                            1. re: Chemicalkinetics
                                                              m
                                                              MacGuffin RE: Chemicalkinetics Jul 3, 2013 03:13 PM

                                                              Sorry for not responding to this sooner, Chem. Do you make omelettes in your FB and if so, do you use Pépin's and/or Child's methods in it?

                                                        2. John E. RE: Dan97526 Jun 1, 2012 09:29 AM

                                                          I have found this pan to be quite helpful in making fluffy omelettes or fritattas on the stovetop or in the oven. It's made in America too!

                                                          http://www.google.com/products/catalo...

                                                          1. Will Owen RE: Dan97526 Jul 1, 2013 11:19 AM

                                                            I'm a convert from Julia's blazing-hot omelets to Eric Ripert's low-and-slow. Very different, in that the result is quite tender instead of elastic, and tastes more of the egg etcetera, the downside being it must be folded very gently if you don't want it to fall apart. My pan for both kinds has been an antique tinned copper one, and it's turned out the best omelets I've ever done with the least fuss and bother.

                                                            However, the need to stay with wood or plastic tools has been a bit of a hassle, and I'm wondering about the new non-Teflon nonstick formulas. A chef friend insists that cheap nonsticks from the Asian markets work just fine, but I suspect he just uses them until they get scratched up and then buys new ones. So does anyone have any experience with the ceramic coatings?

                                                            2 Replies
                                                            1. re: Will Owen
                                                              randallhank RE: Will Owen Dec 16, 2013 05:44 AM

                                                              If you truly make the omelette the way Julia suggests, it should not be elastic at all. The key is to only cook it for 20 seconds, so it is barely cooked (à baver, or "drooling,") when removed from the pan. The last bit of cooking is done in the plate via conduction. I guarantee you will not have elasticity this way. Yes, there will be a slightly different texture on the outer part, as compared to the inner, but this is one of the properties of a classic French omelette. If what you were going for was absolute consistency of texture (which is called for in many other French recipes and techniques), you could simply use a sous-vide method. But, the end result would be something very different from a French omelette. Also, two large eggs is all that you can really use with Julia's classic French method because, as Julia points out, if you have higher egg volume, the high heat will cause some of the eggs to become rubbery before the omelette is really ready to be served.

                                                              1. re: randallhank
                                                                m
                                                                MacGuffin RE: randallhank Dec 16, 2013 07:24 AM

                                                                I agree, including with your observation that the interior continues to cook once the omelette's rolled and plated. It comes down to personal taste and if I do say so, my "country" (Pépin's designation) omelettes were things of beauty that everyone loved but once I learned Julia's method, I never looked back. There's just nothing like putting your fork to something that offers no resistance whatsoever and then melts in your mouth. It took some practice, though. I had to learn to watch the butter and to pick up the back of the pan about 45º off the range when it was time to shake. I think the classic French method of shaking the pan and using the heel of the fork makes for a potentially prettier omelette and they're delicious but I prefer the results using Julia's method. I don't think I'd enjoy an "elastic" omelette.

                                                            2. Atomic76 RE: Dan97526 Jul 10, 2013 03:32 PM

                                                              For a three egg omelette, I would probably go with a 10" pan. I use an 8" nonstick pan for two egg omelettes.

                                                              I've found that just putting a lid on it and letting it cook gently is the most goof proof way to make them. It steams and sets the top of the egg, while the bottom part cooks. No need to keep scraping and tipping the pan and accidentally tearing the omelette.

                                                              Show Hidden Posts