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What do I do with this duck egg?

h
hungrydyke May 25, 2007 07:48 PM

I bought a duck egg on impulse at the farmers market today. Now I'm unsure what to do with it. How is it different than a chicken egg other than being huge? It got a little dinged so whatever is happening with it is happening tomorrow am. Please advise.

  1. m
    MakingSense May 25, 2007 07:53 PM

    Duck eggs have a stronger taste than chicken eggs. They may be a bit of a shock unless you like a little gamey taste in your food.
    But they are wonderful for baking and add a very rich taste. Make a simple recipe that will benefit from the taste of butter and fresh eggs.
    How about a simple sugar cookie? Roll them out and cut them into the shape of ducks. If you don't have a cookie cutter, draw a simple outline on cardboard and cut around it with a knife.

    8 Replies
    1. re: MakingSense
      Sam Fujisaka May 25, 2007 08:00 PM

      Or just eat it like you would a chicken egg. They're good!

      1. re: MakingSense
        h
        hungrydyke May 25, 2007 08:03 PM

        Thanks for the idea but I have enough cookies in the house plus even carnivores like me may not go for "gamey" sweets.: )

        I'll most likely have a two meal fried egg.

        1. re: hungrydyke
          m
          MakingSense May 25, 2007 08:19 PM

          They don't taste strong in baked goods. Just rich.
          Let us know what you think of them as eggs-eggs.
          (Remember that Sam-I-Am will eat anything. He's even eaten bugs!)

          1. re: MakingSense
            Sam Fujisaka May 25, 2007 09:25 PM

            Although I've eaten more duck eggs as balut, duck egg omelettes are great--you can, of course, use stronger flavors; and serve with plenty of plain rice.

            1. re: Sam Fujisaka
              Veggo May 25, 2007 09:28 PM

              That's a little obscure for me. Please amplify.

              1. re: Veggo
                s
                smartie May 25, 2007 09:33 PM

                I used to buy duck eggs but found they gave us all stomach aches after making scrambled eggs with them

        2. re: MakingSense
          MamaDuck Jan 23, 2010 07:51 PM

          It all depend upon where you get you duck eggs. If ducks are fed garbage then their eggs taste strong. If ducks are fed feed and grains, then their eggs taste light and clean.

          I raise ducks and sell duck eggs. They are free-ranged and raised with lots of care. Adults, children and chefs love my duck eggs. I have been told that the yoke is rich like eating cream and the white is fluffy in texture. I sell many dozens to mothers for their children who can't eat regular chicken eggs, because of allergies. I ship my eggs around the country year-round. My favorite way to eat my duck eggs is easy-over or soft boiled so I can enjoy it's flavor.

           
           
           
          1. re: MakingSense
            MamaDuck Jan 24, 2010 05:01 AM

            It all depend upon where you get you duck eggs. If ducks are fed garbage then their eggs taste strong. If ducks are fed feed and grains, and free-ranged, then their eggs taste light and clean.

            I raise ducks and sell duck eggs. They are free-ranged and raised with lots of care. Adults, children and chefs love my duck eggs. I have been told that the yoke is rich like eating cream and the white is fluffy in texture. I sell many dozens to mothers for their children who can't eat regular chicken eggs, because of allergies. My favorite way to eat my duck eggs is easy-over or soft boiled so I can enjoy it's rick creamy flavor and delightful texture.

             
             
          2. AbdulSheikhMohammed May 25, 2007 09:34 PM

            Since this is your duck egg "cherry", why not keep it simple? Just fry it or scramble it or make a simple omelet or something... get a feel for what it actually tastes like before you try to start making elaborate preparations with it.

            At least that's what I'd do... I can't recall ever eating anything other than a chicken egg. I'd sure like to try some other stuff out though...

            If it were me, I'd cook it sunny side up with a couple of pieces of bacon and some toast. Always keep it simple on your cherry; that's my advice.

            1 Reply
            1. re: AbdulSheikhMohammed
              t
              torty May 26, 2007 02:06 PM

              I agree but would add a little cream cheese to smooth out the taste. Also, depends on what the duck was fed. Our backyard duck eggs tasted different at various times of year as their diet changed. Our extras always went to husband's co-worker from the South who swore by them in baking. I never got a sample because he and his friends ate up whatever she baked before it got home!

            2. starlady May 25, 2007 09:49 PM

              Never had a duck egg but have had lots of quial eggs. My fave are pickled quail eggs. The perfect pickled egg in one bite format. Can't get better than that :)
              So I would do something simple with an unknown, see if you like the flavour before getting more elaborate. I would try a simple Omelette, you can stuff it with what ever and still get the egg flavour.

              1. maria lorraine May 26, 2007 10:01 AM

                Baking is best -- a duck eggs's richness and deep orangy-yellow color make them
                perfect for lemon curd or custard or any baked good.

                Gamey is not the right word: just richer and deeper in flavor. I had a flock of 20 ducks,
                and was often gifted with their offerings on our lawn. Baking is the best use of them. Another thought is to use your egg in a classic Caesar salad dressing, the kind made in the bottom of the bowl from scratch. Or, a simple fried egg with butter and a perfect piece of bread.

                1 Reply
                1. re: maria lorraine
                  o
                  onebillybat Mar 23, 2010 04:23 PM

                  How many duck eggs do you use when baking a cake the same as chicken eggs ?

                2. 4
                  4Snisl May 26, 2007 02:29 PM

                  If it's cracked, you probably don't want to have it sunny-side up or over easy. However, if it isn't cracked (the ding is just cosmetic) and that's the route you choose to go, in my opinion, the white can tend to toughen up more easily than chicken egg whites. I like to bring the egg out about 30 minutes before I cook it so that the yolk has a chance to thicken over a lower temp that doesn't toughen the white.

                  2 Replies
                  1. re: 4Snisl
                    h
                    hungrydyke May 28, 2007 06:08 PM

                    Thanks for the advice all. Had the egg sunny side up before I saw 4Snisl's apt comment but luckily don't feel any worse for it. It was really yummy and I am plotting many other possible preps. The color of the yolk alone is worth the price of admission.

                    1. re: hungrydyke
                      4
                      4Snisl May 28, 2007 08:19 PM

                      Glad you liked it! (and are feeling OK:) Sunny side up is one of my favorite ways to enjoy duck eggs.

                      Another suggestion for enjoying- put that sunny side up egg over fresh pasta tossed with steamed rapini and garlic sauteed in extra virgin olive oil (and a touch of chili flakes or freshly ground black pepper if you like). Shave some fresh Parmesan on top. This is one of my all-time favorite dinners- the yolk makes the most delicious sauce for the pasta when mixed with the olive oil, pepper and Parmesan.

                  2. m
                    Muscovey Dec 28, 2009 04:10 AM

                    Duck eggs will become important if the economy continues to slide. Ducks do not get sick like chickens do, so domestic ducks (like the muscovey that I have) will be easier to keep in a "victory garden." Cholesterol is higher than chicken, but duck eggs aren't as acidic pH, so they are not inflammatory (cause of disease, arthritis, etc. in humans) like chicken eggs.

                    They do make baked goods fluffier, and hard boiled are great,.,,BUT the membrane is thicker than a chicken egg and I have never been able to keep a fried egg white from being too "rubbery" for my taste. I'll try frying in caste iron and using the heavy oil (NOT olive though, because at higher temps it actually breaks down and becomes "rancid" and "toxic.")

                    1 Reply
                    1. re: Muscovey
                      g
                      gretaflo Mar 30, 2010 04:48 PM

                      My son was given a Muscovey duck and we are now getting eggs. How often should I expect eggs? I really didn't think they laid everyday but we are now getting 1 daily. I have yet to eat with the eggs but will this weekend

                    2. k
                      kpaxonite Jan 20, 2010 01:52 PM

                      put it under a warm light and wait for it to hatch then raise the duck and eat it.

                      1. mnosyne Jan 20, 2010 02:02 PM

                        I remember an issue of Gourmet last year in which the Mayor of a small town in the Dordogne and his wife dined on potatoes fried in duck fat with the duck eggs fried on top of the crispy potatoes. If your arteries can stand it...

                        1. r
                          runwestierun Mar 24, 2010 12:18 AM

                          Every year I wait for my neighbor's ducks to lay (they only lay in the spring) and then I BAKE! The duck egg yolk has more fat and the white has more albumin, and any baked good that is fluffy to start with is measurably fluffier when baked with duck eggs. I substitute them one for one. I know they are bigger but this has worked for me in everything I've tried. Sticky buns are the best!

                          1. w
                            will47 Apr 1, 2010 03:22 PM

                            Not worth it for one or two, but we make ours into salted duck eggs, 6 or 12 at a time. Soak them in a salt brine for about a month, and then either store them or hard-boil them and store them; they'll keep indefinitely either way. These are very salty, but are excellent as an accent, either in Filipino style tomato / duck egg salad, cut up small in Chinese style rice porridge, etc. etc.

                            1. n
                              nancyfox Apr 16, 2014 03:43 PM

                              I use duck eggs as the egg to use for battering. For fried chicken, chicken fried steak etc. Anything you use a egg for can be either or of the eggs.

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