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Egg Gravy

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  • oranj Apr 5, 2007 03:58 PM
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The discussion below of the Chinese Minced beef with egg reminded me of how I have been looking for a recipe for the other dish that they mentioned.

It usually loks like this
http://hk.geocities.com/ryou_hazuki20...
or
http://static.flickr.com/16/88066897_...

I've only had it with shrimp, and I think that the second photo shows an overcooked dish. It shouldn't look like mega cornstarched egg drop soup. (no strings) I think the dish has a lot of cornstarch and oil in it, but I haven't managed to get an idea for the technique involved, nor have I had any luck looking for recipes. Anyone know how to make this?

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  1. The photos look like some sort of an asian style egg gravy. I'm not familiar with that. But here is a recipe for Midwest (US) Egg Gravy that I pull out when I've got family coming into town:

    1/2 lb bacon
    3-4 cups milk (at room temp)
    3-4 egg yolks (makes a richer gravy than using the whole egg)
    2 tbsp (rounded, not measured) AP flour
    salt and pepper to taste

    Fry up the bacon in a pan. Remove the bacon and reserve.

    Add 3 cups milk to the pan drippings, reserving one cup of the milk for later. Heat over medium high heat until steamy.

    Meanwhile, combine yolks and flour in a bowl. Whisk together until smooth.

    When milk is hot, slowly temper about 1 cup of milk mixture to the egg mixture, whisking well to combine.

    Add tempered egg mixture to the pan. Cook over medium heat, whisking constantly. If gravy becomes too thick, add reserved milk.

    Cut or crumble bacon and return to gravy in pan. Serve over biscuits, potatoes, chicken fried steak, etc.

    2 Replies
    1. re: Non Cognomina

      Thanks for the recipe. THe one I am looking for is more asian steamed but I might try using some of the technique here in an experiment.

      1. re: oranj

        Cool. Let us know how it turns out. I'm very curious.

    2. Try this recipe for Shrimp Cantonese
      2 lb. raw shrimp, shell and devein, split down the backs but not all the way through (wash and drain)
      1 Tbl. vegetable oil
      1 clove garlic, mashed
      1/2 pound pork, chopped fine (I sometimes use pork sausage)
      2 Tbl. soy sauce
      1/2 cup hot water
      salt
      1-1/2 Tbl. cornstarch mixed to a paste with cold water
      2 eggs

      Heat oil in pan or wok, add garlic and salt and brown - remove garlic. Add pork, stir well and cook until pinkness is gone, add soy sauce, stir and add shrimp. Add hot water, cover and simmer for 3 minutes. Add cornstarch-cold water mixture slowly and stir. Crack eggs over all, stir slowly and cook 1/2 minute. Another option: add a package of petite frozen peas. Serves 2.

      Lobster Cantonese
      3 Tbl. vegetable oil
      1 clove garlic, mashed
      1/2 lb. pork butt, chopped fine
      1-1/2 Tbl. soy sauce
      2 cups chicken broth
      1 tsp. sugar
      2 lobsters (1-lb. each) cracked and cut in 2-inch pieces
      2 Tbl. cornstarch
      2 Tbl. cold water
      2 green onions, chopped
      1 egg, slightly beaten

      Heat oil in skillet, add garlic and pork and stir-fry until pork loses its pink color.
      Stir in soy sauce, chicken broth and sugar and bring to simmer.
      Add lobster, cover and cook for 10 minutes.
      Mix cornstarch and cold water, add slowly to lobster and stir to thicken.
      Stir in chopped green onion. Pour beaten egg over the lobster and stir to set egg. Serves 4. You can substitute crab for the lobster in this recipe.

      These are just quick notes on recipes from an old tattered copy of a 1965 church cookbook —the cover is long lost.