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What part of the pig is the "knuckle" ?

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I keep looking at the positively pornographic photo of Daniel Boulud's "Pig Knuckles with Endives" in one of his fine cookbooks. It looks unctiously delicious. But I can't seem to find pig knuckles in any markets: I've tried Korean, Mexican, Vietnamese, and Rich White People markets all over Los Angeles. (There is no such thing as a proper butcher where I live).

Just what part of the pig is the "knuckle" ?

Here's a picture of one (no, not Boulud's... this one is Filipino):

 
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  1. OK so here's the answer to "what part of the pig" is it... http://www.chow.com/ingredients/183

    Now how do I ask for that at Supermercado Liborio ?

    2 Replies
    1. re: HungryDante

      How is the meat cooked in this recipe? Long slow braise? roast?

      In the picture is there bone? Possibly a knee or elbow type of joint?
      The Wiki article on pork has a picture of roast knuckle
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pork

      It looks to me as though this is the shank end of a ham, or rear leg. The shank end of a front leg might also work, especially if braised.

      The Spanish word for leg is 'pierna'.

      paulj

      1. re: HungryDante

        HD:

        "Por favor, Ustedes tienen la pierna del cerdo? Se me pueda dar x kilos? Gracias."

      2. You might want to try a Chinese market -- braised or "red cooked" pork knuckle is a classic Shanghainese dish.

        1. You could try the description in Wikipedia - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schweins...

          A German market might suit you . . .

          3 Replies
          1. re: raydlee

            Considering the OP is from March 24, 2007 and his only other post is from May 2007, I'm guessing HungryDante pretty much flew the coop.
            {;-/)

            1. re: porker

              Nope. I'm still here. Lurking and snacking.

              1. re: HungryDante

                Greetings!
                Didja ever make anything with pig knuckles?

          2. Well, I doubt this is relevant anymore, but....
            it's the jointed portion, rear legs.

            3 Replies
            1. re: mamachef

              Along the relevancy angle...
              I saw raydlee's post and started to prepare a reply with diagrams and pictures, then saw Sam's post and thought "whats the date to this?".

              I couldn't help myself its usually ME being the one posting to way-out-of-date posts...
              Hehe.

              1. re: porker

                However, speaking of this. Know any place in Montreal serving old school pig knuckle?

                1. re: Zalbar

                  Capri (2172 rue Saint-Patrick) down the street from Magnans.

                  I ate some good pig knuckles in Longueuil as well, but I was there only once last summer - I'd need a bit of time to dig it up if you're really interested.

            2. Fabulousness. No really, one of my favorite parts of the pig as long as it's low and slow cooking.

              1. So were clear on this topic that the knuckle is more like the elbow end of the pig, or hock, and since the rear leg has more meat it is the preference to use.

                1. It is the only part I use for my "collard" greens! Yummy.

                  1. The Germans definitely have a way with pork knuckle --

                    in the Nordrhein-Westfalen region, it's called "schweinehaxe" and is available either with a soft texture from a closed braise, or oven-roasted.

                    Both are butter tender, and one of my favorite dishes anywhere, especially with knodel (potato/bread dumplings, which I will be the first to admit are heavy, and not overly flavorful, but oh, I love them), rotkohl with apples, and a crisp top-fermented Kolsch beer. Definite stick-to-your-ribs fare.

                    Unsmoked, uncured knuckle is hard to find on this side of the puddle, though, so I tend to only get it when traveling in Germany.

                    1. Find a German shop, it's German