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Chinese BBQ Pork

c
claree Mar 20, 2007 02:45 AM

I'm dying to try making this at home or at least a reasonable facsimile. One recipe I found calls for slicing the pork butt or tenderloin and hanging the slices by wire hooks in the oven after marinating. I probably don't want to make it that much! Has anyone just ever done a whole roast(tenderloin, loin or butt) and what's the best marinade?
Thanks!

  1. CindyJ Mar 20, 2007 12:40 PM

    You can make those hooks from pieces cut from wire coat hangers.

    3 Replies
    1. re: CindyJ
      r
      ricepad Mar 20, 2007 04:04 PM

      I'm not sure I want to take the chance of eating the paint off the hanger...

      1. re: ricepad
        Melanie Wong Mar 20, 2007 04:30 PM

        As we were taught in Brownies on the fine art of marshmallow roasting, you burn the paint off the hanger before using it.

        1. re: ricepad
          r
          rldish Jun 26, 2007 03:17 PM

          I have a recipe called "Paper Clip Pork" that uses large paper clips opened up for the hooks. But a rack over a baking pan works just as well and is a lot easier.

      2. r
        ricepad Mar 20, 2007 09:55 AM

        In addition to the one kare raisu posted, there's another thread about char siu here: http://www.chowhound.com/topics/323849

        I use bone-in pork butts and bone them myself (I save the bones to make tonkotsu broth for ramen). In my experience, pork loin/tenderloin are too lean and end up too dry. I also don't use the hooks to hang...too much hassle...and instead, I just use a broiling pan (if I'm doing it in the oven) or directly on the rack in my offset smoker.

        Don't be put off by the quantities that most recipes produce...there are economies of scale that make it well worth it, and you can freeze it pretty well, too. Just wrap each strip really well in plastic wrap and freeze. At any given time, I have somewhere between a pound and 5-6 pounds of char siu in the freezer, in labelled zip bags.

        1 Reply
        1. re: ricepad
          chef chicklet Jun 26, 2007 03:19 PM

          I'm with you, one piece of meat marinated for a good amount of time, cook and slice as you need it.

        2. kare_raisu Mar 20, 2007 07:57 AM

          http://www.chowhound.com/topics/35169...

           
           
           
           
          1. Cupcakes Mar 20, 2007 06:57 AM

            there's a great recipe in this month's Cooks Illustrated. I mean really, really great.

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