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chicken breasts on the bone...help/ideas?

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I've always broiled these but would like to roast/bake them in the oven tonight. What temp? How long? Seasonings? How to serve?

Thanks for all & any input...

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  1. If you like goat cheese you might consider this recipe....these breasts always come out beautifully...I've successfully substituted olive oil for the butter...Chicken Breasts with Goat Cheese and Rosemary from epicurious:

    http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/rec...

    1. Last week I was in the same boat, so I baked them in a shallow pan, in a convection oven at 375* for about 40 minutes (they were freakishly large).

      I patted them dry, and brushed them thickly with a paste of dijon mustard and finely minced garlic, then sprinkled with thyme, salt, and pepper. Did not baste, as the dijon-garlic paste would have slid off.

      Served with roasted broccoli florets, crusty bread, and green salad.

      1. There is a recipe from Molly Steven's that calls for them to be braised in Cider with parsnips that is amazing. The is a link to the recipe in a thread from yesterday on Chicken breasts.

        1. There's also a combo recipe: in a cast iron skillet, heat a couple tablespoons of olive oil on med-hi, and brown seasoned (salt, pepper, thyme, garlic, etc., as desired) breasts skin side down, turn them, and pop the whole pan (browned side up, can add more seasoning such as rosemary if desired) into a pre-heated 375 degree oven for about 35 minutes, or until juices run clear. Try to leave some space between the pieces.

          1. I love this recipe for Chicken Roasted With Onion and Soy Sauce-it uses chicken breasts with bone:
            http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/rec...

            1. I roasted some large chicken breasts on the bone at 400 for an hour sprinkled generously with bbq-type seasoning, and they were gorgeous!

              1. The Jfoods have roasted chicken at least twice a week. After 20+ years of testing i have settled on 425 as the correct oven temp.

                For medium sized breast i cook for 40 minutes. The other night we had some big-boys and they needed another 10.

                Seasoning. I normally open the seasoning draw, take a deep breath and say, "OK what do i want tonight." No matter what i put on the birds, the others walk into the kitchen 20 minutes later and say, "OMG what smells so good." It's amazing what a little baking seasonings can d.

                1. tdo_ca does chicken just as I do, in a cast iron skillet that finishes in the oven. It is so good. Below is a cooks illustrated recipe that follows this method that is wonderful:

                  Pan-Roasted Chicken Breasts with Sage-Vermouth Sauce
                  3/2003

                  We prefer to split whole chicken breasts ourselves because store-bought split chicken breasts are often sloppily butchered. However, if you prefer to purchase split chicken breasts, try to choose 10- to 12-ounce pieces with skin intact. If split breasts are of different sizes, check the smaller ones a few minutes early to see if they are cooking more quickly, and remove them from the skillet if they are done ahead.

                  Serves 4

                  Chicken
                  1 cup kosher salt (or 1/2 cup table salt)
                  2 whole bone-in, skin-on chicken breasts about 1 1/2 pounds each, prepared according to illustration
                  Ground black pepper
                  1 teaspoon vegetable oil

                  Sage-Vermouth Sauce
                  1 large shallot , minced
                  3/4 cup low-sodium chicken broth
                  1/2 cup dry vermouth
                  4 fresh sage leaves , each leaf torn in half
                  3 tablespoons unsalted butter , cut into 3 pieces
                  Table salt and ground black pepper

                  1. Dissolve salt in 2 quarts cold tap water in large container or bowl; submerge chicken in brine and refrigerate until fully seasoned, about 30 minutes. Rinse chicken pieces under running water and pat dry with paper towels. Season chicken with pepper.

                  2. Adjust oven rack to lowest position and heat oven to 450 degrees.

                  3. Heat oil in heavy-bottomed 12-inch ovenproof skillet over medium-high heat until beginning to smoke; swirl skillet to coat with oil. Brown chicken skin-side down until deep golden, about 5 minutes; turn chicken pieces and brown until golden on second side, about 3 minutes longer. Turn chicken skin-side down and place skillet in oven. Roast until juices run clear when chicken is cut with paring knife, or thickest part of breast registers 160 degrees on instant-read thermometer, 15 to 18 minutes. Transfer chicken to platter, and let rest while making sauce. (If not making sauce, let chicken rest 5 minutes before serving.)

                  4. Using potholder to protect hands from hot skillet handle, pour off most of fat from skillet; add shallot, then set skillet over medium-high heat and cook, stirring frequently, until shallot is softened, about 1 1/2 minutes. Add chicken broth, vermouth, and sage; increase heat to high and simmer rapidly, scraping skillet bottom with wooden spoon to loosen browned bits, until slightly thickened and reduced to about 3/4 cup, about 5 minutes. Pour accumulated chicken juices into skillet, reduce heat to medium, and whisk in butter 1 piece at a time; season to taste with salt and pepper and discard sage. Spoon sauce around chicken breasts and serve immediately.

                  1. I've lowered the temp to 375-400 as I have found over 400 either failed to cook through or dried out the edges - one issue for me anyway is that I do not always bring my meat up to room temp...but eyeballing the browning for an extra minute seems to adjust the cook time to my liking

                    1. I prefer dark meat, but when I do cook bone-in breasts, I like to roast them with a stuffing under the skin. One of my favourite stuffings is made by sweating minced onion and garlic, stirring in some watercress until wilted, and adding in a small amount of fresh bread crumbs, salt, pepper, and whatever herbs and spices call to me. Sprinkle the stuffed chicken with salt and pepper, and pop it into the oven.

                      I'm a fan of roasting chicken at higher temperatures, and usually go with 425-450F for about 30 minutes for bone-in breasts.

                      1. I like to let the breasts sit in a mix of plain yogurt and mustard for about 30 minutes then coat the chicken in crushed corn flakes with a little cajun seasoning and paprika. I then spray the chicken lightly with pam and then bake for 45-50 minutes at 375.

                        1. I roast low and slow. . .IIRC, about 275-300 for an hour or more. (I do this when I don't have anything pressing to do, obviously.)

                          Place in baking dish w/chicken broth in the bottom, rub skin w/butter and sprinkle with either S&P OR poultry seasoning, OR once I think I used a mix called fines herbes. (I think that's like herbes de provence?)

                          Nice browned skin. . .flavorful but not that crispy, but as none of us are really skin eaters we don't care. Extremely juicy, tasty meat. And house smells wonderful! :-)

                          1. I put a bit of butter under the skin, sprinkle with salt and pepper. I add cut up onion and some garlic cloves to the pan and bake at 350 for an hour or so. I place the breasts skin side down for a while, then turn them right side up.

                            Delicious, moist chicken! yummmm............................

                            1. Oven FRied Chircken!
                              Remove skin and soak overnight or for a few hours in buttermilk spiked with hot sauce, salt and pepper. Dip in mixture of 1/2 crushed Corn Flakes, Half fresh bread crumbs, some sage, salt and pepper. Lay on rack on top of cookie sheet and bake in hot oven until done. This is a paraphrase of a Cook's Illustrated Recipe.