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Hot Sour Salty Sweet: beef/ pork

February 2007 Cookbook of the Month: Hot Sour Salty Sweet by Jeffrey Alford and Naomi Duguid. Please post your full-length reviews of recipes from the sections on beef and on pork here. Please mention the name of the recipe you are reviewing as well as any modifications you made to the recipe.

A reminder that the verbatim copying of recipes to the boards is violation of the copyright of the original author. Posts with copied recipes will be removed.

Thanks for participating.

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  1. The cumin beef paties are one of those things I keep going back to over and over. I tend to vary the vinegar depending on the mood I'm in. In fact last night I tried it with llime juice and I think it may become a permanent replacement.

    Edit....opps wrong book I'll just leave quietly by the back door! sorry!

    1. OK rob133 after 3 posts of OOPS wrong book, I'd love to know what book you were cooking from. Those OOPS recipes sound good!

      1. Jeffrey Alford and Naomi Duguid's other book 'Mangoes and curry leaves'. I cook from that two/three times a week. I got the Hot Sour book a few weeks back and it has yet to truly inspire me to cook from it. I tend to want to read it all, learn a little more about the type of recipes and the ingredients before I dive in to far to the cooking. I'm sure in a few months I'll be using it a lot

        1 Reply
        1. re: rob133

          O/T but I love those beef patties too, they are delish.

        2. We love the pork and greens with gravy. I don't fry the rice noodles, just mix them in at the end to soak up the gravy.

          4 Replies
          1. re: waver

            This has become my standard recipe whenever I get asian greens from our CSA, but I do quite a few variations. I normally use tofu instead of pork (but I do use the fish sauce as I'm not trying for a vegetarian version). I usually serve it with rice instead of rice noodles, and with sriracha instead of the vinegar/chile sauce in the recipe. I also usually add minced ginger and crushed red pepper with the garlic--I'm sure it's not authentic, but I like the added spice. But that basic gravy is pretty excellent and I never get tired of it.

            1. re: waver

              This is one of the great tastes, IMO. Awesome dish. Thanks for the tip on the noodles.

              BTW, the noodles we get are stuck together pretty firmly, and it can be difficult to get them to seperate. Any tips on that?

              1. re: uptown jimmy

                Are they dried or fresh? Have you tried soaking them in water?

                I use dried and soak them in hot water while the rest cooks (I guess I skipped that step above, sorry).

                1. re: uptown jimmy

                  I have that same problem with this and similar fried noodle recipes. One thing that helped was to cook in VERY small batches, basically a one-person serving at a time in the wok. I found mine much less clumpy after that. I almost always use dried noodles, because this is the dish I make when I am lazy and want to use up scraps from around the house.

              2. I love the Green Wrapped Flavor Bundles - p.269
                We've been using lettuce and haven't tried them with the pickled cabbage. One of these days. But they're great with the lettuce.