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Huge bag of dried shiitakes

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OK. I know I can make stir-fry. Other ideas? We're selling the house/moving within 4-5 months and this is one of those pantry ingredients I've had around forEVer.

(For anyone who's a costco member, it's the huge bag they were selling for awhile.)

TIA.

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  1. Sometimes I'll soak a few in warm water to make a quick stock for cooking brown rice, and just add the rehydrated shrooms, gill side down, to the rice cooking pot, too.

    Several ideas on a previous thread:
    http://www.chow.com/topics/346064

    1 Reply
    1. re: FoodFuser

      risotto! soak in warm stock (or some sherry or other spirit), drain and use part or all of the soaking liquid for your risotto. saute the rehydrated mushrooms with some shallots (maybe garlic, but not too much), then "buid" your risotto, using that liquid along with some additional stock....maybe add asparagus, or ?

    2. I just made some soup with shiitake mushrooms as one of the ingredients. I usually save leftover gravies, sauces and seafood liquors in the freezer. The other ingredients were kielbasa, onion, celery, garlic, turkey stock (made from Thanksgiving turkey carcasses), roasted scallop liquor, lima and pinto beans, lentils, split peas, and hand-squeezed canned whole tomatoes.

      I soaked the shiitakes in warm water until they were soft enough to thinly slice. Of course, the hard stems were discarded, but the soaking water became part of the soup.

      I didn't measure many of the other ingredients. The canned tomatoes already came measured.

      1. Risotto, and use the soaking water as your mushroom stock. You could supplement with fresh mushrooms, if you wish a variety

        Filling for a lovely mushroom tart with some goat/ricotta cheese/eggs/

        1. Here's a nice Chinese way of using them. It uses a lot since it's the primary ingredient;

          Braised Mushrooms (Hung Shiu Doong Gwoo)

          4 oz (125 g) dried shiitake mushrooms, soaked in 3-4 cups (750 ml-1 L) hot water for 30 minutes
          2 Tbs (30 ml) soy sauce
          2 Tbs (30 ml) sugar
          1 tsp (5 ml) toasted sesame oil
          3 Tbs (45 ml) peanut or vegetable oil

          Remove and discard the stems from the mushroom. Squeeze as much liquid from the mushroom caps as possible into a small bowl. Add enough of the soaking liquid to make 1 1/2 cups (375 ml). Add the soy sauce, sugar, and sesame oil, stirring to dissolve the sugar. Heat the peanut oil in a large heavy skillet over high heat and saute the mushroom caps for about 3 minutes. Add the liquid mixture, reduce the heat to low, and simmer covered, stirring occasionally, until all the liquid has been absorbed and the mushrooms are shiny, about 3 minutes. Serves 4 to 6.

          1. When I roast a chicken, I simmer a big handful of dried mushrooms in hot water to cover until they're rehydrated. Then I scatter them around the bird in a roasting pan and pour in the mushroom water, which adds flavor.

            1. Here's a Jean-Georges Vongerichten recipe where he pulverizes dried mushrooms, then uses them to coat boned racks of lamb.

              http://www.globalgourmet.com/food/spe...

              1. these things last for years, really and I should know. I cook Asian foods all the time so I always have shitakes.
                I use them in dumplings, shu mei, won ton, egg rolls, and lumpia
                Soups, sweet and sour, wonton, corn chowder, chinese tomato soup.
                Egg foo Yung, moo shu pork, moo shu chicken, pork buns, stir frys, veggie stir frys you name it, they add a dimension that is rich and silky. Don't throw them out, they won't expire.