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Fresh Chinese Noodles in San Mateo???

j
jestur1 Jan 24, 2007 09:17 PM

Has anyone been to this restaurant called Everyday Beijing in San Mateo? It's on B. Street in between 5th. Ave and Santa Ramen. I was driving by tonight and noticed a sign saying something about handmade noodles in the front window.

Has anyone tried this place? How are their noodles? I'm a sucker for good noodle soups and was wondering if it was worth trying out. Thanks!

  1. Melanie Wong Jan 24, 2007 10:22 PM

    Haven't been there yet, but did drop in last month to pick up a menu and chat with the owner. The couple are true northeners: he's from Beijing and she's from Shandong. Not via Taiwan or Korea. The noodles are made in house by a machine that simulates hand-pulled noodles, or that's what she told me. Looking forward to trying it and hearing from those who have. Here's the website.
    http://everydaybeijing.com/

    1. yimster Jan 27, 2007 06:56 AM

      On a trip to the Herb shops in San Mateo I stop by for lunch yesterday. Both joy and disappointment at Everyday Beijing.

      Great noodles very fresh as I was told by the owner made daily on site. Had the texture and "bite" (close) of hand pulled.

      But as with most of the hand pulled noodles place, great noodles but poor broth and toppings. With that said my first too choices of noodles were out.

      With all that said I will be back to try the Chow Mien offerings and my other choices of broth and toppings.

      Thanks for the tip of a new place so close to home.

      BYW Santa Ramen had a line out the door. At least eight to ten people while there was no wait here at noon.

      7 Replies
      1. re: yimster
        Eugene Park Jan 27, 2007 11:14 PM

        Which broth/toppings did you try that were poor, and which are you going back to try? I've got a hankering for hand-pulled (or a fair approximation) noodles since I got back from Shenzhen/Macau/HK earlier this month.

        1. re: Eugene Park
          yimster Jan 28, 2007 06:43 AM

          Well Eugene, I order in Chinese, while the on line menu is in English and I think it was number 12 Family style noodles. The one I first requested was the Braised Beef Stew Noodles (since the Beef Stew broth is made with stew sauce).

          I was talking to another noodle lover Friday night and it was agreed the noodles were good, fresh but the two bowls they had was lacking on the broth.

          I plan to try Chow Mein and hope they are better.

          1. re: yimster
            K K Jan 28, 2007 07:43 AM

            What cut of beef did they use in the noodle soup you had? Were they flank with strips of tendon (like Taiwanese style like A&Js) or brisket like HK style (Ngau lam)? Sounds like you had hung shiao style (hung siu) if it were braised.

            1. re: K K
              yimster Jan 28, 2007 08:03 AM

              I did get yet. They were out. I am hoping for something close to A&J's. The broth for the Tai Lue Mein was really bland and I would not order it again.
              Hoping that the Chow Mein verison will be better. Should be Hung Siu brisket not tendo.That is what the Chinese menu reads. If you beat me there please report.
              I am limiting my eating out until after my next Doctor appointment.

              1. re: yimster
                K K Jan 28, 2007 10:54 AM

                A&J's beef noodle soup beef is the closest thing to authentic Taiwanese BNS, using real deal flank cut (ngau zeen in Cantonese, or ngiu zien in Mandarin) with tendon inside, cooked for hours and hours until soft and tender (some might like it chewy). I had a splendid BNS in Taipei earlier this month where they used that same cut but tastes way better than A&Js. Cantonese style brisket isn't the same. There are even places in Taipei that sell beef noodle soup at US$100 a bowl, very high end cuts of beef, but I've heard it is a terrible gimmick.

                Flank cut beef and separate cuts of tendon can be ordered at most places for soup ie either beef by itself or beef and tendon. So you'll get extra tendon anyway since if flank cut is used, it has some tendon anyway.

        2. re: yimster
          p
          peachblossom Dec 9, 2009 09:36 AM

          Sorry. I don't mean to thread hijack but I plan to go here for dinner tonight. I'd like to stop off at nearby herb shops if possible. What herb shops did you go to which are nearby?

          1. re: peachblossom
            yimster Dec 9, 2009 09:42 AM

            Sorry, I have never shopped for Chinese Herbs in San Mateo. Not to be funny but dried herbs do have shelf life. But I did remember a herb shop on El Camino (on the east side of the street a few doors down from East Lake). I have not been in the store or if it is still there but you could drive by and see.

            Otherwise 99Ranch in Foster City has Asian herbs.

        3. Melanie Wong Jan 28, 2007 09:36 AM

          Hope someone reports on the housemade dumplings (e.g., shui jiao).

          1. p
            Pinkster Feb 1, 2007 02:23 PM

            Tried this for lunch today - I'll have to agree with yimster's comments on the broth. We ordered the noodles with mustard greens and shredded pork. While the noodles were very good, the broth was just a bit odd. Left almost a sour aftertaste. We also ordered the XLB which had a thicker wrapper than Happy Cafe and less broth inside - will not get this next time. Our final dish was House Fried Strips of Pancake (per the menu) - the 'strips of pancake' seemed to be like super thick, doughy short noodles (2-3 inches long) and were fried with beef, chicken, shrimp, onion & other veggies. This was delicious - a nice sauce, great bite on the pancake strips/noodles. Worth a trip and I do plan to try to chow mein next time as well.

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