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Salad cream, malt loaf & other British food

I've been checking out local African markets & they carry lots of British groceries.

Salad cream which seems similar to mayonaise has caught my eye. However in a different topic about mayo, it seems nothing good was said about salad cream. Do you like it and how do you use it?

Of course the totally impartial Heinz site says "Famous chef Marco Pierre White once said: “Salad Cream is one of the greatest culinary inventions of the 20th century.”

Someone mentioned where to find malt loaf on my local board. That poster said it was hard to desribe and yes, I'll just link to the picture and description ... spicy malty pork quesadillas?
http://www.soreen.com/original_malt_l...

As long as I'm British grocery shopping, anything else I should consider buying? I've always meant to try those Heinz beans to see how they compare to American baked beans.

Some info on salad cream
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salad_cream

The Heinz site with product info & recipes like salad cream potatoes, salad cream omelete and salad cream hot dogs ... yeah ... somehow that last one ... though Heintz says they are "Finger licking good!"
http://www.heinz.co.uk/products/heinz...

Very funny salad cream info ...

"Its ingredients (spirit vinegar, vegetable oil, water, sugar, mustard, salt, egg yolks, modified cornflour, xantham gum and guar gum as stabilisers, and riboflavin for colouring) are simple yet ingenious and cover the four main food groups, but like many other things the end product is greater than the sum of its parts."
http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2/pda/A50...

What is really in salad cream
http://thefoody.com/mrsbsoups/saladcr...

BTW, if looking for British food in the US, in addition to British and African grocery stores, Indian markets carry some groceries too.

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  1. After frequenting an LA pub that's become the focal point for the growing Brit-expat population, I've begun to see the wisdom of using malt vinegar and/or HP sauce to dip my "chips" in.

    1 Reply
    1. re: SauceSupreme

      MMM...I love HP Sauce. It's the tamarind extract that does it for me. I think I have an addiction to anything with tamarind...I crave it at the oddest times.

      My favorite irish pub in Annapolis carries it...along with an assortment of other unfamiliar sauces that i'm slowly working my way through.

    2. I'm English, I hate salad cream. Whatever you do, don't let the salad cream put you off other things - it's one of those exception to the rules things! (Oh same could be said for sandwich spread - ick horrible horrible)

      1. On a recent trip to London I became addicted to Branston Pickle.

        1. Try Salad Cream on your chips as well......

          I now having a craving for Branston and Old Cheddar.

          What about Scotch Eggs. Boiled egg wrapped in sausauge, bread crumbed, then deep fried. Only the Scots could do it.

          1 Reply
          1. re: industry worker

            I've also had it baked, but yes, scotch eggs are great.

            All of my friends think I'm referring to an egg dipped in single malt! When I switched them over, they never turned back.

          2. Salad Cream is like pourable Miracle Whip. I find no real use for it. Heinz Beans, on the other hand, are great. You'll find they're far less sweet than any American ones. They're more tomato-ey as well.

            You ought to see if you can get some nice biscuits (cookies). Like chocolate Hob Nobs or chocolate Digestives. In case you didn't know, "Plain Chocolate" is dark chocolate (as opposed to milk chocolate).

            1. My MIL is British and rolls out an elaborate Christmas Eve luncheon extravaganza, chock full of the faves. Smoked turkey breast, baked ham, roast goose are the usual suspects. Then you have 5 different layered pates, pork pie, Branston pickle, Piccalilly sauce, Cumberland sauce, Scotch eggs, heirloom tomatoes with salad cream (delicious!), cornichons, pickled beets, olives, artichokes, etc. The meal is finished with her mother's Christmas fruitcake (begun in late August...), jam and lemon curd tarts, and a cheese plate full of British delights: Colston and Basset stilton, white Cheshire, etc.

              It is a delicious feast, and a real celebration of all of those unique British flavours!

              1. Strange, they serve salad cream as a salad dressing at an English tea house called Tudor House in Santa Monica, CA.

                I kind of like it and even got a bottle for home - good for dipping baby carrots into.

                1. Heinz beans are a lot different to the American varieties, a lot differerent and an awful lot better.

                  Scotch eggs are great, but I always prefer the smaller savory eggs which are basicly scambled egg instead of a whole egg - often you'll get additional fillings as well to give it a slight variation on taste.

                  Branston Pickle is a must on my list as are mushy peas (a neccesity with fish and chips) and a jar of British pickeld beetroot is far superior to what comes in tins over here (Actually Del Monte do semi-decent picked beetroot in a jar, but it isn't quite right).

                  Another store room must is Bisto gravy granules. I know its easy to make real gravy but the smell of Bisto is simply too good not to experience.