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Whats the best way to cook duck at home?

billjriv Jan 18, 2007 08:08 PM

Whats the best way to cook duck at home?

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    ngardet RE: billjriv Jan 18, 2007 08:10 PM

    Cut into pieces, steamed then browned.

    1. macca RE: billjriv Jan 18, 2007 08:20 PM

      Here is a link to a recipe I found on these boards- and it was really good

      http://www.chowhound.com/topics/28183...

      1. jdm RE: billjriv Jan 18, 2007 08:20 PM

        I use a recipe that I found in Saveur years ago called the "amazing five hour roast duck". Obviously a recipe for a leisurely afternoon at home, but really quite simple and very tasty. You also end up with a few cups of duck fat to fry potatoes in.
        http://www.saveur.com/article.jsp?ID=...

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          Youffraita RE: billjriv Jan 18, 2007 10:35 PM

          Roast duck is tradition in my family for Thanksgiving (and I do it again at Christmas because I love it). Wild rice makes an excellent stuffing; but any good bread stuffing also works well. The main thing is to prick it lightly all over with a fork before you put it into the oven, and do so again several times while it's roasting. This makes it almost self-basting, and puts the duck fat into the bottom of your roasting pan, yielding a less-oily duck.

          Also, I follow Joy of Cooking's instruction to preheat the oven to 450, then, when you put the bird in, immediately turn the temperature down to 350. And I do baste it a few times toward the end of cooking.

          I'm assuming here that your bird is a typical Long Island-type. Don't know about wild ducks.

          1. soypower RE: billjriv Jan 18, 2007 10:37 PM

            does anyone have any ideas on how to cook peking duck at home? every recipe i've seen requires some kind of macguyver'ed hook/pulley system...any ideas on how to get that crispy skin without visiting my home depot first?

            btw, to the OP, am not trying to bogart your post, just hate seeing multiple discussions on very similar topics. :o)

            1 Reply
            1. re: soypower
              tastyjon RE: soypower Jan 19, 2007 04:17 AM

              It's not bogarting... my first thought when reading the original post was "how about Peking Duck" style?

              To answer the OP and yours, I would follow with the question... do you have access to a BBQ/smoker at home?

              My first inclination would be to grill or smoke it to get a great flavored skin. I'm not a turky fan, but have been cooking breasts lately on my smoker and people have been raving about the taste. Likewise, I like to brown chicken drumsticks on the gas grill and then move them off the direct heat for deeper cooking. Duck typically has a good layer of fat and can casue a lot of smoke - hence another reason for outside prep.

              One can achieve similar results in the oven.... or do a combination of both. Like chicken, if you want great skin texture, it's best to expose most meat to high heat. But you don't want to overburn the whole thing, so once you've toasted the outside - back it off the direct heat and cook it lower and slower. The seared skin will help keep the juices in.

              Overall, it's pretty similar to chicken. You can prep it in so many ways. But, like chicken, do you want to chew on a meaty, fatty drumstick? Or would you prefer a lean, skinless entree steamed or boiled? It comes down to your goals.

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              Elizzie RE: billjriv Jan 19, 2007 03:38 AM

              My brother used to make an amazing duck--he'd marinate pieces (breast and legs) in a mixture of soy, fresh ginger and lots of garlic, then grill it over indirect heat. Served always with sauteed watercress. I've gotta call him and ask him to make that for me; mine never turns out quite as good.

              1. michele_corum RE: billjriv Jan 19, 2007 07:43 PM

                Domestic or Wild? I've never cooked domestic but by the good graces of Mother Nature and a generous brother who hunts, wild duck is a staple in our family. Our family recipe is to keep it simple. Lots of salt & pepper inside then broil/roast on a very high heat until just done. The trick is to serve it RARE. We garnish with butter and Lea & Perrins. That's it.

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