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Hubby's chicken soup

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I just wanted to share this with you guys, my children and myself have the sniffles, hitting below 50 in South California, something we are not that used to. My husband made chicken soup last night for us. I have had chicken soup before, but something in the way he makes it cures us. One year I was feeling extremely lousy, getting the flu at work, I went home and he made this huge pot of it and the next day I went in a felt like new. Even my co-workers saw me and try to pry out of me what I had. It’s his soup. It’s just the basic, chicken, potatoes, carrots, celery, and some rice; of course salt and some pepper. It always works; maybe it’s the love he pours into or something. =-)

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  1. From the article below:

    According to food historians, chicken soup was already being prescribed as a cure for the common cold in Ancient Egypt. The 10th century Persian physician Avicenna also referred to the curative powers of chicken soup in his writings. In the 12th century the Jewish sage Maimonides wrote that chicken soup "has virtue in rectifying corrupted humours", and recommended it as nutrition for convalescents; Maimonides also particularly recommended chicken soup for people suffering from hemorrhoids and the early stages of leprosy.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicken_...

    1. And I always heard that it was the parsnips that Jewish Grandmothers put in their soup.

      Years ago, while working as a hospital chaplain, I contracted simultaneously strep and staph. I was I in bed for a week with nothing to eat but chicken soup. For several days, I couldn't even swallow a solid meal. My little apartment reeked of chickens, and for years I couldn't stand the smell of it cooking. Fortunately, that has changed. Only now I love to put some fresh ginger in it and a bit of squash--an ingredient in a chicken soup made by a lady from Trinidad when I had a bad flu last year.

      1 Reply
      1. re: Father Kitchen

        I just started a pot of turkey soup and ran to throw in a piece of ginger. Thanks!

      2. Chicken soup is magical. Everybody knows that, all over the world.

        2 Replies
        1. re: uptown jimmy

          Yes, it surely is magical...I crave it whenever I have a cold and I will shout out an "Amen!" to Father Kitchen's ginger recommendation. Ginger tea by itself is great too when you have a cold.

          1. re: Val

            My girl loves ginger tea made with fresh ginger and fresh lemon juice. Drinks it all the time.

        2. By coincidence, I happened to start a pot of chicken soup in the pressure cooker right before reading this. The soup includes a whole chicken broken down into parts (the bones are essential for flavor), an onion, a few carrots, about a "thumb length" of sliced ginger, and 8 cloves of smashed garlic. The ginger + garlic + chicken combo is so restorative (hope it helps my kids, who both have colds!). Will probably splash in a littly dry sherry and add some chopped baby bok choy later along with the usual S&P.

          1 Reply
          1. re: 2m8ohed

            We still have some left, I am going to try to put some ginger in it for tonight. Hopefully it will taste just as good...mmm

          2. Around here we make a chicken broth with ginger and garlic, and sometimes a tiny dab of chili oil in it. A squeeze of lemon over it just before serving. Nothing better when we're sick.

            1. The KISS chicken soup forms the base for all that ails you. This is Water, Chicken, onion, carrot, salt. Place in apot, turn on the flame, watch 2 hours of TV and eat.

              Everything else adds to the mystique of the basic soup. Ginger sounds great, parsnip adds a nice touch, garlic probably turbo-charges the mystique, not wild about potatoes or zucc in my chicken soup,

              2 Replies
              1. re: jfood

                What? No celery?

                1. re: Father Kitchen

                  Nope, this is my DW change from her bubby's recipe. Since she is not a big fan of celery she does not add. Does not seem to take away from the medicinal effect.

              2. A few years ago it was reported in some scientific journal that there really is a scientific basis for the reputation that chicken soup has as a cure-all for the common cold. Apparently, there is a compound in chicken which (when taken in large enough quantities) acts as an anti-inflammatory (cuts down on the clogged sinuses).