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americanized chinese food in bay area

  • j

where is the best americanized chinese food in the west bay,chow mein was a staple of my child hood diet!

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    1. re: Cary

      That's not old school Americanized Chinese. That's yuppified, watered down, "modern" Americanized Chinese. Subtle but important difference for anyone who grew up on chop suey.

      Speaking of which, I had take-out from the Chinese restaurant on lower Burlingame Ave (south side of street, across from Starbucks) last Friday, and that might rate a visit. I'd never had chop suey before and didn't really like the food at all (lots of diced celery and zucchini in everything), but maybe that fits the bill?

      1. re: bernalgirl

        was that king yuen you went to on b game avenue its on the right side if your going down tword the high school a real small joint

    2. Yeah, probably, now that Yan Can Cook has vanished. Of course, there's always the Bamboo Garden, on Lincoln Avenue in Alameda, a real old-fashioned 40s-style chop suey joint. The East Bay is full of old places like that. Just look in the Yellow Pages for anyplace with "garden" or "Peking" or "palace" in the name. Or "Stix".

      1 Reply
      1. re: Shep

        there seess to be a lot of "pagodas" or "dragons" too.

      2. Tai Chi on Polk St. makes a clone of the Tomato Beef Chow Mein I used to love in the early 60's. Of course, they also have some more modern stuff too..... like General Tso's Chicken.

        Link: http://eatingchinese.org

        Image: http://www.pbs.org/opb/meaningoffood/...

        1. Seriously, though. China Hut, on Lincoln at Webster in Alameda, is very old school. Comfort food for 50s kids. China House, at Santa Clara and Park, up on the second floor, Sam Wo vibes except everybody's real polite. Sweet and sour anything. Or if one finds oneself in Livermore, stop in at Lo's on First st between K and L, for well-executed American Chinese standards. Like Sinatra on the jukebox.

          4 Replies
          1. re: Shep

            I moved to Colorado from Massachusetts and my children and I were incredibally dissapointed when we ordered take-out from what we thought was a chinese restaurant.Maybe it was but just different in the west than in the East coast?Back home Chinese food consisted of batter fried chicken fingers,beef teriyaki(on the stick w/ LOTS of teriyaki flavor)Here it was chunks of what tasted like bland un-flavored meat.The crab rangoon really does'nt differ and the rice here is loaded w/ peas ....YUCK!They also served something called paper wrapped chicken,which was some dry,gray meat that almost tasted burned and it was wrapped in foil,not paper.I miss the chicken wings,loo Mein and jumbo fried shrimp.Why are they so different and is there ANY place out west where Chinese food is like I have described it is on The east coast?

            1. re: crystalmoon1979

              I think asking for Chinese food just like it is on the East Coast is waaaay too vague.

              If you don't want peas in your rice, get STEAMED rice, not fried rice.

              1. re: crystalmoon1979

                Are you basing your judgement of the "west" on one restaurant take out in Colorado? Steam rice is not loaded with peas or anything else. So yes do not order fried rice if you don't want anything with your rice.

                1. re: crystalmoon1979

                  I moved from Massachusetts to California, and I too can't find any chinese restaurants that have chicken fingers. I have really spent a lot of time looking for them, but can only find something similar at chinese buffets, which are really gluttonous and gross, so I have pretty much given up. I think the reason the west coast chinese food is different is because it's more authentic. Growing up, we used to eat Cantonese, but out here are a lot of Mandarin and Schezwan restaurants. At least I have something to look forward to when I visit the east coast!