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need translation help on chinese measurements

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Hi:

I am hoping there are a few old time chinese cooks out there. I am starting a blog translating my mom's old chinese cookbook as a remembrance of her. However, her cookbook uses the measurements 钱, 两 and 斤.

Does anyone know what these translate to roughly in metric or english measurements? I have come across a dictionary dictionary entry that tells me that 斤 is equal to .5KG. But I don't know if that's accurate. Nor do I know how many 钱's and 两's there are in a 斤. Anyone out there with an answer?

Thanks so much! (X-posted to Not About FoodBoard & EGullet)
Annie

  1. Uder the metric system,

    Jin=500 grams
    Liang=50 grams, or 1/10 Jin
    Qian=5 grams, or 1/100 Jin

    However, the Imperial System used a base 16 (like the English system), and one liang could be 1/16 of a jin, but it would be a 20 percent larger "jin" so it would come out almost the same.

    Confusing? Wikipedia has a good article on the history of the Chinese standards; the bottom line appears to be whether the recipe was published before 1928, between 1928 and 1949, between 1949 and 1987, or after 1987 ;-). If the whole recipe is in the same units, it shouldn't matter.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinese_...

    What's your blog's address?

    1. We're closing this duplicate post that was originally on the China Board (we moved it here since that board is reserved for sharing chowtips for China). If you have comments to add, please add it to this thread:

      http://www.chowhound.com/topics/359443