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silver-lined copper pan

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I bought a silver-lined copper saute pan at a rummage sale for $1 (one of those amazing occurences)and after I determined that I could, in fact, cook in it, it became my favorite pan. However, my son was a bit aggressive with it, using a metal spatula, and scraped the lining. Of course, the scrape extends each time I use the pan. Has anyone ever heard of anyone relining silver in pans? Is this something a silversmith could tackle?
Thanks for any and all info!

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  1. When you say silver do you mean a tin lining? if so it can be re-tinned.I have never heard of a silver lined copper pan.

    7 Replies
    1. re: queen artoeat

      I make 925+ Sterling silver linning cookware and it is not as expensive as you think

      1. re: 925Linning

        Really? Would I be able to repair the scratches in the pan, or do I need a complete relining? Where are you located? I am completely in love with this pan!

        1. re: alaughingdog

          Yes Scratches can be fixed and it is not expensive,once you do the relining your pan should last you a very long timme provided that when cleaning harsh materials are not used

          1. re: 925Linning

            Can you tell me how to find someone who does this? I thought I'd have to retire the pan (picture a funeral with tears and flowers...) Thanks!

        2. re: 925Linning

          Would you please send me a price list for your silver lined cookware ?
          Under what name do you sell these pieces ?

        3. re: queen artoeat

          hello,

          how does one get in touch with you?

          i love silver lined cooking items! larhette@comcast.net

          1. re: queen artoeat

            Do you cook in your tin lined copper pans?

          2. I know there was some ultra-expensive Danish copper lined with silver sold in the U.S. many years ago. It was an ideal combination of materials, as silver is an even better conductor of heat than copper. But, as you can imagine, the cost was prohibitive.

            But, if the lining is scraped, it could very well be tin-lined, as the poster above suggests. In which case, it will not be hard to find a re-tinning solution.

            1 Reply
            1. re: btnfood

              hi btnfood,I bought 5 such pans, 30 years ago! Cohr, a danish company made them. I was afraid to use them until last week! Today I saute'ed some salmon gently
              and have wished there was more information about cooing in such good utensils.
              I was a chef and to compensate for low pay, I indulged in great things at home.

            2. I have heard of silver-lined copper, but it's old and was a very expensive "technology." I imagine you'd have trouble finding someone to reline it with silver at anything but exorbitant cost now. If, as is more likely, it was tin, it'll still be a bit pricey, but not ridiculously so. Call your nearest "good" cookware store and ask them for a local source. They make small home kits for re-tinning copper, but they're only useful for some gouges and whatnot - not relining large areas.

              As you've discovered, tin-lined copper is great stuff, but the tin is touchy. You can't scrape it,and you can't use it over very high heat, etc (the tin will actually melt at stove-reachable temps.) But their temperature response is actually better than stainless lined, though IMO, not worth the extra maintenance cost and effort....

              1. This pan is really lined with silver, not tin. At first I thought it was decorative, as it had obviously never been used, but researching it, I found that silver is actually a great cooking surface... I think I'll explore with some of the silver workers around here and see if a repair might be possible. Retinning would be relatively inexpensive, in what I imagine the comparison might be, but then I'd lose the uniqueness of the pan...

                1. Silver conducts heat even better than copper. During the Christmas season, Tiffany's used to advertise a solid silver 10" frying pan for $3,000. I haven't seen it lately, but they undoubtedly have a stock of them.

                  Silver-lined utensils appear on eBay fairly regularly, though they aren't easy to find because most listings are for silver charms.

                  I think any shop that repairs silver plate could put a new silver surface on the pan. Probably they're the same shops that do re-tinning.

                  Copper needs to be about 2.5 mm. thick to be get the best heat distribution, though 2 mm. is also fine. Anything thinner is for display and serving rather than cooking.

                  1. If you can get it done it is going to be very very expensive to do because of the process it will take to do it. Silver plated items are usually immersed in a bath that has an electromagnetic charge and the sliver is transfered on. If you can find someone who can repair old Sheffield plate that was produced by a process called annealing and sheets of silver were bonded on to a surface. That sounds more like what you need and I would first go to antique dealers who specialize in silver. They may be able to point you in the right direction.

                    1. That's amazing - I had no idea silver lined pans even existed. Very cool. A silversmith should be able to help you out silver melts at a relatively low temperature and repairing a scratch should be no issue for an expert.

                      1. OK, I'll bite, how do you know that it is silver lined and not tim? What test did you use?

                        1. Yes, how are you certain it is silver coated? Are there any streak marks? Dark grey areas? If so, it's probably tin, which is spread across the surface manually and tarnishes easily.

                          I have my copper retinned at Rocky Mountain Retinning. If you Google them you can get their phone number and call them. If there's still such a thing as silver coated copper cookware, they probably can help you or direct you to someone who can.

                          And if you find someone who resilvers copper pans, please report. Next time my copper wears out and I have big bucks to blow, who knows?

                          21 Replies
                          1. re: Zeldog

                            Thanks for all the helpful suggestions on this. I didn't do any tests to see if it was silver, but I make jewelry with silver wire and it's a metal I know well. The pan was tarnished when I found it, but obviously much shinier and brighter than tin even with the tarnish. So it looks quite different from tin. Tin has a greyness, and this is, well, silver. Of course, now it's seasoned and pretty much black. There is someone in town who does a lot with silver -- I don't even know how to solder -- so I think I'll start there. I bought this pan at a church sale in Montpelier, VT -- I couldn't believe it when I saw it, and suspect whoever had it was either afraid to cook in it, or didn't know they could cook in it. I don't know how thick the copper is, but it's thick enough that the heat distribution is very even -- it really was the perfect saute pan -- still is, but I think you're not supposed to have an area of copper exposed larger than a quarter? I'm approaching that. Although, I wondered if cooking with oils and fats, as opposed to liquid, would make a difference in how much copper moved into the food?

                            1. re: alaughingdog

                              You can keep using it if you know the food is non acidic. Tomato and citrus are definitely out. There may be a way to test the acidity of a dish if you are not sure. One telltale sign is a green deposit in the copper-exposed area, but this will usually show up after he food has been removed.

                              1. re: alaughingdog

                                An easy way to test if your coating is silver or tin:
                                wad up a few pieces of aluminum foil and place them into the pot with some plain baking soda like Arm and Hammer, maybe 1/2 cup to 1 cup, sprinkled all around. Add enough boiling water to cover the wads of foil and baking soda. The coating below the water line should lose whatever tarnish is there if the coating is silver. It will turn a dull silver white which you can polish to a shine easily with any plain silver polish.
                                If there is no change, it's likely that the coating is tin.
                                The tin used to line copper pots is quite shiny and on new pots is as shiny as silver.

                                1. re: MakingSense

                                  I don't really want to disturb the seasoning, especially since it's clear to me that it's silver, but this might be helpful for a pan where the identification wasn't clear -- ya just never know what will turn up at these church sales!

                                  Thanks for the reassurance about cooking -- at this point, I use the pan mostly for relatively fatty dry sautes, so it's probably okay for the moment --

                                  1. re: alaughingdog

                                    is it a Cohr silver lined copper pan? I have 5 and have just begun to cook in them...I bought them 30 years ago! I worked in "The Kitchen Shop" Cambridge , ma.

                                    I am very careful and love to get them out of my collection.I found a person in Italy who makes them..an 8 inch pot with cover is 350.00 with 124,00 shipping! write to me please..larhette@comcast.net

                                2. re: alaughingdog

                                  hi laughingdog, i love my sterling silver lined pans(5)and just started to cook in them last week!Cohrs, a Danish co. made them and Icould not get any information from them after I bought them and did not use them..Too many unanswered questions.I am starting slowly and hope some information comes from your questions and my posts!Coincidental, found an Italian co. that has them, a small pot with shipping $525.00!

                                3. re: Zeldog

                                  It is SILVER! I bought a number of pieces in New York and directly from the factory in Denmark 30 or so years ago and as far as I know, it was the only silver lined copper cookware made. It is very thick copper and very heavy and very hard to keep clean. Unfortunately most of the pieces I owned were stolen in a home robbery after Hurricane Andrew in Miami. I have a frypan that needs re-silvering and have now idea where to go to get it done. If anyone knows of a place, please reply with a name and address and phone number. Thanks.

                                  1. re: captaindan

                                    Hi, captaindan:

                                    There's good news, and there's bad news...

                                    The good news is that Zapffe Silver Plating can and will do this for you. 800-544-9313 http://zapffesilversmiths.com/ As everyone must, they electroplate the silver to the copper. They tell me that they apply a 90-micron lining to pans which is far thicker than the original.

                                    The bad news is that it's *expensive*. Whereas most retinners charge $4-6 "per inch", this process is $16.50 per inch. So an 11-inch saute 3 inches high is 14 x $16.50 = long green.

                                    I have one Taverna fry pan that I do not use a lot, but I like the lining. Initially, it stuck food like crazy, but it "seasoned", and then has performed well--less sticky than tin.

                                    If you used your set a lot, it would be great for you to share your experience with the Hounds here. Not many of us get the chance to cook in silver.

                                    Another thing to consider is that if one has a favorite pan (as in appendage) or wins the Powerball, any copper pan can be given this treatment. I have a 4mm saute en route to me that may deserve this kind of expense. For me, this would be the ne plus ultra.

                                    Oh, and there is a place that makes and sells new silver-lined pans. http://www.rameria.com/

                                    Aloha,
                                    Kaleo

                                    1. re: kaleokahu

                                      Thanks, that's very helpful information. A lot of money, but the pan is too good not to use it.
                                      Cohr silver-lined cookware cooks beautifully. Don't use high heat. They heat rapidly and evenly.

                                      1. re: captaindan

                                        Welcome. How does Cohr differ from the Georg Jensen Taverna? Post a photo?

                                        1. re: kaleokahu

                                          I'm not familiar with Georg Jensen Taverna, so I can't make a comparison.

                                      2. re: kaleokahu

                                        Have some vintage silver plated copper fry pans on the way to me and am keen to find out the main advantages & how I should use & maintain them in comparison to my tin lined copper pans. ps Kaleo, did you end up silvering your 4mm saute?

                                        1. re: nathan76

                                          Hi, Nathan:

                                          No, I ended up cheaping out and retinning it myself.

                                          As for care, the less you polish or abrade the lining, the longer the silvering will last. If they started out at the usual 15 microns, and are already worn below that, I would be especially careful. A reputable plater told me he could apply 90 microns, but that is still pretty thin. Even so, the greater hardness and higher melting point are huge advantages for silver.

                                          My one silver pan stuck eggs like crazy until I "seasoned" it.

                                          Aloha,
                                          Kaleo

                                          1. re: kaleokahu

                                            Thanks Kaleo, Was the "seasoning" process just a case of using it a few times and taking care to only wipe out rather than wash?
                                            Also has anyone heard of any health benefits of cooking in silver? and why is there only a couple of companies making silver lined pans? is it purely a cost thing?

                                            Kaleo, did you mean you tinned your pan at home?

                                            Cheers, Nathan

                                            1. re: nathan76

                                              Hi, Nathan:

                                              For me anyway, "seasoning" the silver was more like seasoning cast iron. You don't need to worry about melting the silver (unless your oven is a forge or ceramics kiln). I took the empty pan to the smoke point of the oil wipe a few times, and then just started cooking and wiping.

                                              There are claimed health benefits of silver. But people who overdo colloidal silver supplements can *permanently* turn their gums blue. My understanding is there is zero danger of this happening just by cooking on silvered copper.

                                              As for companies making silver-lined pans, the only one worldwide I know that is doing new pans in silver is Mazzetti in Tuscany. If anyone knows any others, I hope they share. In fact the only other I know of that ever did production runs in modern times was Georg Jensen, and their pans weren't all that special--I have one.

                                              I do not think it is a cost thing, especially. I think it is a demand thing. Tin-lined and SS-lined copper both work exceedingly well already. Companies like Baumalu are already set up to plate all their wares in tin--it can't be all that more expensive to plate *new* in silver. I think where it gets $$$ is when you have to pay a specialty plater to strip and prep the old pan, plate it, and then polish the exterior.

                                              Yes, I tinned at home. I was given a lesson by a pro, and then tried to duplicate it at home. The results of my first try were not A-grade, but I'm learning...

                                              Aloha,
                                              Kaleo

                                        2. re: kaleokahu

                                          Hello Kaleo,

                                          I just stumbled with this topic while searching for a silver lining for my pan.

                                          Being from Europe, do you have any idea where I could get a quality silver lining on one of my copper sauce pans? The Mazzetti family do make it, but it is only 15 micron thick, which seems rather poor comparing to your indication of a possible 90-micron lining.

                                          Best,
                                          PC

                                          1. re: PortugueseChef

                                            Hi, PC:

                                            I do not know of any specific establishment in Europe, although I believe there is a tinner in Bristol England with the capacity to do the work (still has a commission with Her Majesty...)

                                            If you poke around a bit, you should find that any quality silver-plating business can do this. As can some musical instrument (brass) manufacturers. Ricci Argentiere might do it, and would probably know who does if they don't.

                                            I asked the Mazzettis about silvering a pan. They send this work out to a local jeweller, and won't say who.

                                            Good luck, and if you find someone other than Zappfe, please post the information.

                                            Aloha,
                                            Kaleo

                                            1. re: kaleokahu

                                              Hello Kaleo,

                                              I know Zappfe does it (to 48 microns, I was told), but for me it is much more expensive to ship the item to the US, that's why I am trying to find out someone in Europe that does it. What is the name of the tinner in Bristol? I don't think I've found that particular one.

                                              Best,

                                              PC

                                              1. re: PortugueseChef

                                                Hi, PC:

                                                Sorry, but I can't remember the name. They do have a website, though.

                                                The best I can do right now is give you a link to someone who uses them: http://www.coppermillkitchen.com/abou...

                                                Good Luck,
                                                Aloha,
                                                Kaleo

                                                1. re: kaleokahu

                                                  Hello Kaleo,

                                                  The tining company I know of in Britain that applies silver and works by appointment to Her Majesty is Sherwood Tinning, but they're not based on Bristol. Also, from what I've learned, they only apply about 15 microns, which is below what I've been looking for.

                                                  Best,

                                                  PC

                                                  1. re: PortugueseChef

                                                    Hi, PC:

                                                    Ah! That's the one. Sorry, I thought it was in Bristol.

                                                    Aloha,
                                                    Kaleo

                                    2. I ́m located in Peru Where are you ?

                                      1. I have a seven piece set of cookware stamped SILVER-QUEEN Silver Plated Copper Denmark. The pieces have a plain shape, similar to commercial aluminum, but are silver plated inside and out. I got them at a garage sale for $100 about 15 years ago. I have cooked with them, and they clean up easily with silver wash. There are a few thin spots, and I will keep this page as a reference if ever decide to have them re-plated.

                                        1. Okay, it's been over 2 years since you originally asked the question, so this may be moot. But here's a resilvering service on the internet. I was curious myself--I found a silver-lined copper pan on ebay but wanted to know something about the likely costs going forward before purchasing.

                                          On this link they do resllvering of holloware, and one price listed is for a baking dish, around $200. I don't know at all how they do it. DId you say you work with jewelry? Could you melt it yourself? ;) Of course it would depend on the temperatures the silver and copper melt at.

                                          http://www.thesilverpeople.com/hollow...