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White Stilton?

rworange Jan 6, 2007 08:35 PM

Never heard of this until a recent post about the supposed sad state of American cheese that mentioned Stilton flavored with things like lemon, cranberries, blueberries, etc.
http://www.chowhound.com/topics/355827

Turns out white stilton is used for the flavored version.
http://www.recipetips.com/glossary-te...

So, is this worth seeking out? Are the flavored types any good. I read Trader Joes sells it.

If you have plain old unflavored white stilton, what are the best ways to use it?

Personally I wouldn't critisize American cheese if my own country was selling green mint-flavored stilton with chocolate chips in it ... although some people on the web who were brave enough to try it were raving about the taste. I guess it is sort of like thinking of using cream cheese for flavored cheesecakes.

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  1. tuqueboy RE: rworange Jan 7, 2007 12:58 AM

    White stilton with crystallized ginger is an old-fashioned but tasty, rich dessert cheese in england. Plain white stilton is very rarely found there. Although I suppose you could probably use it like chevre or feta, though it's not particularly strong.

    1. Ruth Lafler RE: rworange Jan 7, 2007 02:33 AM

      Trader Joe's does indeed sell several different "flavors" of white stilton.

      1. rworange RE: rworange Jan 7, 2007 02:56 AM

        Have you tried any, Ruth? I'm intrigued by the crystalized ginger version.

        1 Reply
        1. re: rworange
          Eat_Nopal RE: rworange Jan 8, 2007 11:19 AM

          I've had a lemon & a berry one stilton... not impressed it has a similar gritty, annoying texture to commercial marzipan.

          I do remember having decent stilton at an English tea house, but I don't know anything about the brand. Also at Whole Foods, they had a nice one they were sampling a couple of years ago.

        2. m
          MikeG RE: rworange Jan 7, 2007 03:14 AM

          I don't remember the details now, but I found white Stilton ultimately boring the one time I encountered it. It was "OK", but very bland. Not at all like what I expected. which I guess was a milder version of the blue. It wasn't. If you can imagine what Stilton is like without ANY hint of that moldy/sharpness, there you go. But it's hard to imagine the taste of Stilton without it. So I'd say try it you come across it, but don't go out of your way and don't pay and arm and/or a leg for it, if you do find it.

          I don't like "stuff" or extrinsic flavors in cheese (other than appropriate mold), so I haven't tried any of the flavored versions to compare. I know I've seen one with lemon of some sort.

          1. d
            djohnson22 RE: rworange Jan 7, 2007 05:45 PM

            I rather like white stilton with Lemon, as well as with blueberries. They are rather sweet though, so more suitable as a dessert offering than say an appetizer.

            1. JMF RE: rworange Jan 7, 2007 05:47 PM

              I've tried apricot Stilton and found it interesting and different. Creamy, tangy, a little sweet, and a bit fruity. A nice mix of sweet and savory. It worked well on a cheese platter.

              1. w
                wawajb RE: rworange Jan 8, 2007 01:47 PM

                Maybe I had a bad piece of cheese...but a blueberry stilton I tried once was one of only three cheeses I have EVER not enjoyed. In fact I tried one taste on a cracker, made myself swallow it, stared in disbelief, tried another taste, spit that out and threw away the whole chunk. It was disgusting, overly sweet, gritty (and not in the good way of parmesan or really sharp chedder), and just gross. But like I said, it might have been a really terrible example of flavored stilton.

                1. j
                  julesrules RE: rworange Jan 8, 2007 02:37 PM

                  I don't mind the flavoured versions, but they are pretty expensive for what they are. They in no way resemble stilton which is my favourite blue cheese, the name is very misleading. It's sorta like "the crunchy kind of werther's" -"the not-blue kind of stilton".

                  1. e
                    ericherron RE: rworange Apr 16, 2014 03:59 PM

                    White Stilton is officially not an American cheese. In fact, to be called Stilton (just like Blue Stilton), it has to conform to strict standards, including only being produced in three specific counties in England.

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