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Zuni Cafe Cookbook: Leafy Salads/ Soups

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redwood2bay Jan 1, 2007 03:14 AM

January 2007 Cookbook of the Month: the Zuni Cafe Cookbook by Judy Rodgers and Gerald Asher. Please post your full-length reviews of recipes from the sections on leafy salads and on soups here. Please mention the name of the recipe you are reviewing as well as any modifications you made to the recipe.

A reminder that the verbatim copying of recipes to the boards is violation of the copyright of the original author. Posts with copied recipes will be removed.

Thanks for participating.

  1. Rubee Jan 1, 2007 07:13 PM

    Mixed Lettuces with Mandarins and Hazelnuts. p.140

    I started Zuni early since we'll be away a couple of weeks in January. I served this salad before a dinner of stone crab on Christmas Eve. Simple and delicious, especially with the sweet Satsuma mandarins. I had planned on making the Butter Lettuce salad with Oranges, Avocado, and Shallot Vinaigrette (p. 143), but couldn't find any good avocados. I had already bought a nice head of Boston/butter lettuce, so I used this instead of mixed lettuces. Hazelnuts are roasted, the skins rubbed off, and then coarsely chopped. The Satsumas were perfect for this recipe because they were seedless and have little pith. All I did was peel them and slice into pinwheels. Finished off with a simple vinaigrette of champagne vinegar and olive oil, and I added a little Grand Marnier instead of the Frangelico she suggests.

    http://im1.shutterfly.com/procserv/47...

    11 Replies
    1. re: Rubee
      Carb Lover Jan 22, 2007 12:23 AM

      I made this salad a couple of weeks ago to go w/ the sage grilled cheese sandwich (see starch thread). I used a mesclun mix and fairchild mandarins. I liked this winter salad quite a bit, and it was easy to make. Toasted hazelnuts paired w/ juicy and fragrant citrus is wonderful. I would recommend satsuma mandarins, as my fairchild variety had way too many seeds which was an annoyance while eating.

      Photo of salad:
      http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y45/...

      1. re: Carb Lover
        lollya Feb 26, 2007 07:19 AM

        sage grilled cheese!?! i must must must try this...where is the starch thread??

        1. re: lollya
          beetlebug Feb 26, 2007 11:11 AM

          Here you go:

          http://www.chowhound.com/topics/35598...

          1. re: beetlebug
            lollya Feb 28, 2007 07:14 AM

            Thanks Bug! I didn't see it...hmm, I saw panade (which I made the other night and it was fantastic) Say, I have a question, I'm a vegetarian, and these Zuni recipes always sound fantastic, but when I look online at the book, it appears to have mostly meat dishes - can help me out with what really IS in the book? Thanks.

            1. re: lollya
              beetlebug Feb 28, 2007 07:46 AM

              I think people have posted a lot about the meat dishes because they are fabulous (i.e. Zuni roast chicken and mock porchetta). However, there are a lot of vegetarian dishes too such as the panade (although that calls for chicken stock).

              The more veggie friendly sections would be the appetizers, salads, soups, eggs, starchy dishes, vegetables/pickles/preserves, sauces/relishes, cheese and desserts. In some of the sections, there are meat oriented parts (such as starchy dishes where a few pasta dishes incorporate bacon) but there are an equal amount of vegetarian friendly dishes. Of note, in my mind, would be the vegetable section, egg section and sauces. Some of the sauces are just great and you can use them on anything. Some of the egg dishes also, are unusual yet not difficult to eat for a quick meal (I'm specifically thinking of the fried eggs with bread crumbs).

              But the main thing, for this book especially, is to use quality ingredients that really are the highlights of the recipes. That doesn't change for meat or non-meat dishes.

              Here is the link to the mother thread so that you can see what other 'hounds have whipped up.

              http://www.chowhound.com/topics/355995

              1. re: beetlebug
                beetlebug Feb 28, 2007 07:48 AM

                There are also dishes where you can leave out the meat. I am specifically thinking about the gougeres. In the book, the gougeres are little sandwiches stuffed with bacon, arugula and pickled onions. But, the gougeres alone are worth making and eating. The other stuff was good, but I enjoyed eating all my deformed gougeres by themselves.

              2. re: lollya
                pitu Feb 28, 2007 08:56 AM

                technique-wise, it's totally worthwhile for the vegetarian, esp if you're skilled at subbing mushroom or veg broth (I do that in the panade, it's excellent)

                or maybe it's worth taking out of a library and playing with...

                I checked in on this thread to post a veg variation for the pancetta-asparagus-rice soup (below.)
                And the boiled kale was a big deal for me for some reason -- I stir fry greens all the time, but this changed things up delightfully.

                1. re: lollya
                  Carb Lover Feb 28, 2007 09:11 AM

                  I agree w/ beetlebug that some Zuni recipes can be adapted for vegetarians. For instance, the asparagus soup I made last night called for pancetta but a vegetarian could either leave it out or add something "meaty" like mushrooms. Veggie stock or water could replace the chicken stock. Of course, this would be a different soup than the original, but I'm sure it would be delicious and satisfying if seasoned properly.

                  My take on Zuni recipes as a whole is that they are written w/ the goal of balance in mind; therefore, many contain some form of animal protein, carb, veggie, etc. For those who don't feel comfortable adjusting recipes, then this could be limiting. However, for those who can adjust to their taste and diet, the book can be a valuable tool and technique builder.

                  Some of my favorite non-meat dishes include the roasted cherry salad, citrus and avocado salad w/ shallot vinaigrette, mandarin and hazelnut salad, and of course the bread salad that accompanies the roast chicken! Her sorbet and ice cream making technique is also great. I need to explore some of the pickles and condiments...

                  1. re: Carb Lover
                    lollya Mar 1, 2007 07:47 AM

                    Thank you SO much beetlebug, pitu and carblovah!
                    I really really appreciate your responses. I LOVE to cook, it's what calms me after a long day at work! I read so much about this Zuni book - and have gone back to Amazon time and time again to try to decipher if it would make sense as a purchase. I am a vegetarian, but my better half is not. I don't mind cooking meat for him, but generally pick meals where it can be added if he wants, or left out.

                    I am so happy to hear that there are many techniques that could apply to my cooking. I don't mind changing things up a bit and feel comfortable doing so, with that said, I think this may be a book for me.

                    I tried the panade (i think beetlebug provided me with that recipe - THANKS!)
                    however, when I read about the recipe (you guys are so gonna be nodding along to this) I just HAD to make is the same day. (this provided an issue in the end result) it was fantabulous but a bit mooooooshy for the likes of my boy. I loved it, gloppy as it was.

                    Anyways, thank you all so much.
                    Please do tell more if you feel so inclined!
                    There's a blizzard approaching and I need a hearty comforting meal to surround me after this holy hell of a week at work. ;)

                    lolls

                    1. re: lollya
                      beetlebug Mar 1, 2007 08:45 AM

                      Scroll down. The red pepper lentil soup can be part of a wintry meal. It's quite satisfying.

                      1. re: lollya
                        pitu Mar 2, 2007 07:49 AM

                        with pleasure, lollya
                        check the other Zuni threads too - like the starchy dishes one
                        some of us prefer a bit less broth in the panade for a crunchy top . . .

          2. Amuse Bouches Jan 2, 2007 07:55 PM

            Lentil-Sweet Red Pepper Soup with Cumin and Black Pepper

            This is a good lentil soup, but not knock your socks off. I used the beluga lentils she suggested and red bell pepper. There wasn't any discernible sweetness to the soup -- it may be that it would be more socks knocking if I sought out a sweeter pepper. There really isn't much pepper at all though, and the flavor of the lentils really overwhelms any residual pepper flavor. I also didn't have a mortar when I was making it, so I ground both the cumin and the peppercorns in a pepper grinder, making the soup quite spicy (there's a LOT of pepper and it packs a lot of heat).

            The beluga lentils are tasty but much more enticing raw than cooked -- they lose their black caviar look and look like small dark brown lentils. They are like French puy lentils in that they hold their shape and retain a lot of "tooth". I tend to prefer that type of lentil more for salads and side dishes, and the softer lentils for soup. I also added the full amount of the chicken stock, and pureed it lightly with an immersion blender, and the soup is quite thick.

            I added a slug of balsamic vinegar at the end of cooking (not in the recipe) which gives it a nice zing and tang.

            Overall, a good soup and perfectly satisfying for lunches, but probably won't become my favorite recipe for lentil soup.

            11 Replies
            1. re: Amuse Bouches
              pitu Jan 4, 2007 02:25 PM

              I agree that this is a nice basic lentil soup, but not my ultimate favorite. It *is* a good stepping off point if you don't already make lentil soup, and perfect for winter.

              I always use the dark green French lentils "puy". I like the undertone of black pepper they have naturally, accentuated by the cracked peppercorns.

              Sometime I use cumin, but half the time I forget. It's good both ways.

              I often sub roasted peppers that I've marinated, for the red bells, and I like that better.

              I'm partial to a little tomato in this kind of lentil soup, and I'm surprised it's not in the Zuni recipe. Either a little browned tomato paste, or a couple of crushed canned tomatoes.

              And the chicken broth.
              I use a mix of broth and water (one of her options) . . . it's a good candidate to be a meatless meal, and don't think the extra layer broth adds so much. Tomatoes add more depth. That said, sometime this month I'll make this again with "braised bacon" as the extra layer. THAT should give it something good...

              1. re: Amuse Bouches
                beetlebug Feb 1, 2007 11:51 AM

                Thanks to Amuse Bouches and pitu for their lentil soup suggestions. Taking both their comments in mind, I modified this lentil soup recipe and it turned out really good. Like pitu, I'm not sure this would be my go to lentil soup recipe, but C and I really enjoyed it and it went well with the sage grill cheese sandwiches.

                Modifications:

                I used more red peppers so that there would be a contrast between the sweet pepper and the black pepper. I used about a cup of red pepper (medium size). I also added a splooch of tomato paste to give it a richer taste.

                I had the leftovers for lunch and it heated up well.

                Pic of soup:

                 
                1. re: beetlebug
                  Rubee Feb 1, 2007 11:57 AM

                  Looks good - as does the salad! Do you think the soup would freeze well?

                  1. re: Rubee
                    beetlebug Feb 1, 2007 12:00 PM

                    I would think so. I used the French green lentils so they still had bite to them. I don't think I've ever frozen lentil soup though, we usually finish it within a few days. You know, overflowing freezer issues...

                    1. re: beetlebug
                      Rubee Feb 1, 2007 12:05 PM

                      Hmmmm. E doesn't like lentils. Maybe I'll just whip up a batch and eat it all week. All these posts have tempted me.

                      1. re: Rubee
                        beetlebug Feb 1, 2007 12:13 PM

                        And, it's healthy and filling. The recipe only calls for 3-4 T olive oil for the entire batch of soup.

                        Plus, the temperature is about to take a nose dive. Perfect soup weather.

                      2. re: beetlebug
                        oakjoan Feb 1, 2007 12:35 PM

                        Funny, there's a saying at our house: No matter how many bowls of lentil soup you eat there's ALWAYS some left over....sort of like a def. of infinity.

                    2. re: beetlebug
                      beetlebug Feb 1, 2007 01:51 PM

                      Lentil Sweet Red Pepper Soup with Cumin and Black Pepper (paraphrased from pg. 167-168)

                      Note: my modifications are in ( ).

                      3-4 T extra virgin olive oil
                      1/3 - 1/2 cup (1 cup) diced sweet red pepper

                      1/2 t whole black peppercorns
                      1/4 t cumin seeds

                      1/4 cup/1 oz diced carrot
                      1/4 cup/1 oz diced celery
                      1/4 cup/1 oz diced onion
                      1-2 garlic cloves, smashed and chopped
                      1 bay leaf
                      1 sprig of fresh parsley, chopped
                      1 cup lentils (French puy)

                      4 - 4 1/2 cups chicken stock
                      (tomato paste)

                      Crush the spices in a mortar and pestle.

                      Warm a T of olive oil in a 4 quart sauce pan over medium heat.

                      Add the red pepper and cook for about 5 minutes. The peppers will begin to color.

                      Add the spices and cook for a minute.

                      Add the remaining 2-3 T of oil. Throw in all the other solid ingredients as well as 3 cups of stock. (Add a smoodge of tomato paste)

                      Simmer, stir and salt.

                      Barely simmer in the uncovered pot for about 15 minutes. The lentils will be tender and have absorbed much of the liquid.

                      Turn off the heat and cover for 5 minutes for the lentils to soften some more.

                      If you want, blend the lentils now. The soup will be thick. If not add liquid in 1/2 cups (or, you can be like me and just dump the rest of the box of broth in ;-) ) until you reach a texture that you like.

                      Simmer until the broth is hot.

                      Serve and enjoy.

                      1. re: beetlebug
                        Gio Jan 22, 2009 09:58 AM

                        I made the Lentil Soup this past Tuesday but I had a major brain warp and forgot to buy split peas which was going to be my variation. Not having any lentils in the pantry I used Basmati rice along with 2 yellow peppers. I kept all the amounts she listed in the recipe with the additional substitution of Cilantro for Parsley....and the soup was very good indeed. In fact not a drop was left. I cooked the rice first and added it at the end. It was served with freshly made garlic bread. Yum!

                        1. re: Gio
                          Gio Jan 29, 2009 09:52 AM

                          I made this soup again this past Tuesday and used green split peas as per her recommended variations. This time I used parsley and the yellow peppers but otherwise kept to her recipe as written. We liked this very much. It's a good soup base open to many spinoffs.....

                        2. re: beetlebug
                          yamalam Feb 9, 2009 07:02 PM

                          I made this on Saturday and had a lentil soup taste off with the New Way to Cook Red Lentil Stew with Caramelized onions that I posted about on this month's thread:
                          http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/592557
                          Zuni won, with a few of the variations posted here, so thanks! I used black Beluga lentils and left them whole rather than puree them at the end. In addition to the 1 clove of garlic, I added three more cloves of roasted garlic, and used some marinated roasted red peppers in place of the fresh bells. I also toasted the cumin seeds before grinding them, and added some fresh diced tomatoes. It was awesome, with some good sweetness to counter the black pepper spice and pretty, with the black lentils and red veggies. My new 2nd or 3rd favorite lentil soup!

                    3. Rubee Jan 6, 2007 03:33 AM

                      Zuni Caesar Salad (p. 155)

                      I make Caesar salad a lot - I even have a nice wooden bowl that I use only for that, but I have to say this might be another go-to recipe. There's something about the balance of the flavors that I really liked. Unlike the way I usually make it, it has no Dijon, and also includes red wine vinegar. A pretty straightforward recipe, whisking vinegar, oil, anchovies, and garlic, then adding eggs, a little cheese, and black pepper. Finish by whisking in the lemon juice. One technique that I thought made a difference was rinsing and blotting the anchovies. I didn't have salt-packed anchovies (which she recommends), but always have a couple of jars of Italian anchovies in oil (Scalia). She says to rinse them in warm water and blot to extract as much oil as possible, which made them even better. This classic is a keeper.

                      http://im1.shutterfly.com/procserv/47b7df24b3127cce80dfda6d294800000016109Ict27Vm2w

                      The next night I used leftover Romaine (chiffonade instead of whole leaves) and tossed it with the rest of the dressing to serve with Veal Milanese (Marcella Hazan).

                      http://im1.shutterfly.com/procserv/47...

                      15 Replies
                      1. re: Rubee
                        pitu Jan 6, 2007 04:02 PM

                        Rubee, you're totally inspiring me!
                        We love Caesar Salad, never make it at home, and have those same anchovies around...

                        1. re: Rubee
                          Carb Lover Jan 6, 2007 06:52 PM

                          Rubee, the salad looks scrumptious! And that veal milanese doesn't look too shabby either. Thanks for the inspiration and photos.

                          1. re: Rubee
                            beetlebug Jan 15, 2007 06:50 PM

                            This is a keeper Caesar salad recipe. Next time, I would cut up the romaine into bite size pieces. I found that the whole leaves were extremely difficult to work with. I did find that this recipe made a lot. I bought 2 heads of lettuce (1 1/2 lbs pre-clean) and had a lot of salad leftover. This recipe could have easily fed 8. But, the dressing was divine.

                            Pic of whole salad:

                            http://shim1.shutterfly.com/procgserv...

                            1. re: beetlebug
                              pitu Jan 15, 2007 07:00 PM

                              I've made Zuni Caesar twice now - love it.
                              Making half recipes every time, since it *is* a huge amount.
                              I have excellent farmer's market eggs . . . and some good but oil-packed anchovies.
                              It makes a huge difference to rinse the anchovies in warm water and pat them dry on paper towels. Some day I'll get the salt-packed...
                              I hope I remember to make this when the garlic is fresh and just out of the ground.

                              I tear up the salad too -- that's the kind of thing in a recipe that I ignore since I don't like enormous leaves served in restaurants.

                              Could someone compare this to other recipes for Caesar? Do they ever have mustard?

                              Found this wikipedia entry interesting - the leaves are supposed to be whole and you are supposed to eat it with your fingers. Go figure.
                              http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caesar_s...

                              1. re: pitu
                                beetlebug Jan 15, 2007 07:05 PM

                                Funny, I didn't mind eating it like this in the restaurant, but at home, even eating it was too unwieldly.

                                Enh. live and learn.

                              2. re: beetlebug
                                beetlebug Jan 15, 2007 07:06 PM

                                I have a fair amount of dressing left. How long will it last in the fridge? No more than 2 days? or longer?

                                It's too delicious to dump.

                                1. re: beetlebug
                                  LulusMom Jan 7, 2009 09:05 AM

                                  Re: tearing up the lettuce. What I don't really understand is that I was taught one was never to use a knife on lettuce or salad (is this just some oddball idea of my mother's?), but when you go out sometimes there is just no way you could fit the leaves in your mouth in one bite. Whats the story - seriously, is my mother just making stuff up?

                                  1. re: LulusMom
                                    d
                                    dfrostnh Jan 7, 2009 09:15 AM

                                    I also learned not to cut lettuce with a knife and remember getting a special plastic knife at a Tupperware party to use to core the lettuce. I think the problem is with iceberg lettuce. I think anything makes it turn brown! I make a romaine salad most days for lunch and I cut the romaine with a metal knife. It never browns.

                                    1. re: dfrostnh
                                      LulusMom Jan 7, 2009 10:09 AM

                                      Whew, glad to hear this isn't just some weird thing. I usually just tear the lettuce myself when making the salad, but have always felt awkward when served one of those ones with the huge full romaine leaves.

                                    2. re: LulusMom
                                      beetlebug Jan 7, 2009 10:09 AM

                                      I don't know about the etiquette about eating salad. But, when I ate this salad at Zuni, I had to cut it up. It would have been too awkward and messy if I stabbed it with my fork and then took a bite of it.

                                  2. re: Rubee
                                    Breadcrumbs Jan 29, 2013 07:31 AM

                                    Zuni Caesar Salad – p. 154

                                    At long last, I finally got around to making this salad. Sadly, Zuni was a COTM (twice) long before I discovered Chowhound but in reading through these threads, this was one of the recipes I marked in my book as being a “must try”. I’m happy to declare this to be our new “go-to” recipe and would be interested to know whether Rubee, almost 6 years later, would still consider it hers.

                                    I know others have commented on the absence of Dijon but what struck me was that this recipe didn’t call for any Worcestershire. In the past, our favourite Caesar dressings have called for a dash or two of Worcestershire. I must say we didn’t miss it at all in this instance. We thought this salad was sensational and though it’s only two days since we had it, mr bc is already pleading w me to make it again.

                                    I’d also add that I really enjoyed the author’s head note about all the factors that go into determining the taste experience you have w this salad. We all know fresh is best but I loved the way she described how each individual element influences the experience. So often I’m tempted to prep my ingredients in advance but after reading this I squeezed the lemon juice as I prepared the dressing and I tasted after each addition of my cheese. Love, love, loved this salad and the toasty-tender croutons. This recipe is indeed a keeper!

                                     
                                     
                                    1. re: Breadcrumbs
                                      Rubee Feb 14, 2013 12:45 AM

                                      I'm so glad you like it as much as I do. I actually was going to make this tomorrow night as part of our Valentine's Day dinner, but went with a Caesar dressing I made ahead since the planned entree tomorrow is labor-intensive.

                                      Of course, now I'm re-thinking my decisions thanks to you ;)

                                      1. re: Rubee
                                        Breadcrumbs Feb 14, 2013 04:36 PM

                                        Hah, so funny you posted this today Rubee because I made this salad tonight to go with our grilled filets and shrimp! I'm so grateful for your original review, it enticed me to try this and we so love it!!

                                      2. re: Breadcrumbs
                                        w
                                        walker Oct 15, 2013 09:44 AM

                                        I have not made the salad but have eaten it at Zuni, best Caesar I've had; they serve it with whole little romaine leaves .. I like it better that way. You can request that they use just the inner leaves. I forget how many cases of romaine they go through each day.

                                        1. re: walker
                                          Breadcrumbs Oct 29, 2013 05:08 AM

                                          Thanks for the reminder about this recipe walker. It's been far too long since I've made it and I must rectify that!! I'll try whole leaves if I can find the smaller romaines.

                                    2. g
                                      gchiker3 Jan 6, 2007 07:04 PM

                                      Love the Ceasar Salad from the Zuni cookbook. I actually use anchovy paste (doesn't take as muh time and I never use the whole can of anchovies) The best part of the salad, especially in my kids opinion, are the croutons. I always make xtra as we nibble on them prior to dinner. Also the Zuni Bread Salad is to die for. A bit labor intensive, but worth every bit of the time spent. We were inspired after dining at the Zuni Cafe and watching the chef who was roasting chickens in the brick oven. He saw us drooling over the intense aromas and gave us a few morsels to taste before our meal came out.

                                      1 Reply
                                      1. re: gchiker3
                                        oakjoan Jan 7, 2007 05:19 AM

                                        I also made the Zuni Caesar Salad tonight. I've made Caesar Salads lots of times before, but this one was just right! Delicious. It was part of a whole meal from Zuni Cookbook. I'll post the rest in the appropriate threads.

                                        Got the book out of the library and feel very lucky to have found a copy on the shelf!

                                      2. beetlebug Jan 10, 2007 09:41 PM

                                        Shredded Radicchio with Anchovy Vinaigrette, Bread Crumbs and Sieved Egg (pg. 151)

                                        This was pretty good. I had too much radicchio so the bread crumbs and vinaigrette flavor didn't fully come through. I also didn't add enough salt to it. But the sieved egg was a nice touch. I'm munching on the leftovers now and it held up well.

                                        I served this with the roast chicken and bread salad.

                                        Picture of salad:

                                        Picture of salad plated:

                                        http://shim1.shutterfly.com/procgserv/47b7df31b3127cce9854887fbac100000017102UatGjRoxs

                                        http://shim1.shutterfly.com/procgserv...

                                        1. pitu Feb 3, 2007 12:54 PM

                                          boiled kale four ways p.162
                                          correctly described as primitive and more appealing than it's dull name . . . totally simple and delicious lunch. and a fine use of an onion and a bunch of kale. I put pecorino on it, but I think it would be better with parmigiano. I just ate it as a bowl of soup.
                                          I make kale all the time, but never alone as soup.
                                          I'm going to keep trying these so-simple-you-pass-them-by recipes in Zuni. They are a total goldmine.

                                          And, uh, I don't have the next book of the month.

                                          7 Replies
                                          1. re: pitu
                                            rose water Feb 5, 2007 04:39 PM

                                            pitu, what perfect timing. i had a huge bunch of kale in the fridge, and had just decided that the recipe i had intended to use it in was far too fussy and time consuming. this soupy, oniony kale is delicious, simple and supremely comforting.

                                            one of the four ways is with poached eggs inside. delicious, filling, comforting, and great textural contrast.

                                            this is a far cry from the labor intensive, rich, fatty Zuni recipes. but i still learned a nice trick from doing it--she recommends toasting bread, then rubbing it with garlic. it's so simple that i almost feel reluctant to mention it, but what a simple flavor enhancing trick!

                                            pitu, i'm all for your plan to keep going with simple Zuni recipes. i look forward to hearing about more of your discoveries.

                                            1. re: pitu
                                              beetlebug Jun 19, 2007 11:53 AM

                                              I had a ton of kale and collards from my CSA box. I used both of these to make the boiled kale. This was absolutely delicious. Smooth and comforting but with a ton of flavor. It's not the prettiest of all dishes (what veggies after being simmered for 30 minutes are) but dang, is it tasty. The combo of kale and collards worked extremely well. I probably added a bit too much water in it so it was more soupy than described. If I had bread, I would have tried the boiled kale on toast variation.

                                               
                                              1. re: beetlebug
                                                beetlebug Jun 19, 2007 12:55 PM

                                                http://shim1.shutterfly.com/procgserv...

                                                1. re: beetlebug
                                                  Gio Jan 7, 2009 05:34 AM

                                                  Last night we made the Boiled Kale Papa which is another of her Four Ways...pg. 163.
                                                  It was wonderful. The addition to the boiled kale is bits and pieces of a country loaf. I had 1/2 a baguette and a small piece of Scali and used chard instead of the kale. I served it with a gratin made from leftover beans and lentils... recipe in the New Way To Cook book.....Delicious!!

                                                2. re: pitu
                                                  Blythe spirit Oct 14, 2013 06:39 PM

                                                  Boiled Kale on Toast p.162

                                                  I loved this! And might never have tried it had I not seen the positive reviews and also had a bunch of kale that needed to be used up. The title of the recipe conjures images of ascetic pilgrim fare - but the results are delicious!
                                                  Followed the directions for washing, rolling and slicing the kale into 1/8 inch thick slices. Sautéed 6 oz. of diced yellow onion over low heat until translucent but still firm. At this point I did elect to add the optional pinch of red pepper flakes and 2 slivered garlic cloves along with the kale. Wilted the kale and probably added the water a bit too soon; you are supposed to wait five minutes but I was worried about the garlic getting too much color. I am also not sure whether or not I added too much water. JR says to add enough to cover the kale by 1/2 an inch but I was using a wide sauté pan and the kale kind of floated a bit. Added salt to taste.
                                                  In any event, I simmered (covered) for about half an hour. Before the kale was done I toasted a slice of a sourdough round (did not have peasant bread) on a very hot grill pan until slightly charred. As per the recipe, I rubbed raw garlic on the toast while it was still hot. And it really did make a difference in the final result!
                                                  I dipped the top of the toast in the liquid from the kale and then spooned the kale onto to the toast followed by a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil, shaved Pecorino Romano, freshly ground black pepper and some ribbons of prosciutto. Since I love Kale, I spooned some extra into the bowl as well.
                                                  This was more than the sum of its parts - delicious, homey and yet chic too. Wished I had taken a picture too because it was very appetizing looking. This will definitely become a standby after-work or casual meal for me. I can hardly wait to try the egg version with the leftovers tomorrow.

                                                  1. re: Blythe spirit
                                                    w
                                                    Westminstress Oct 15, 2013 07:16 AM

                                                    I love this dish! It is really good with the fried egg. And if you have leftover kale broth, freeze it as it makes a good base for soup (something complimentary like minestrone or a kale and white bean soup, for example).

                                                    1. re: Westminstress
                                                      Blythe spirit Oct 15, 2013 10:02 PM

                                                      Westminstress,
                                                      What a good idea! I wish I had read your post sooner. I just saved the actual kale this time. Next time, I will freeze the broth too.

                                                3. Dommy Feb 23, 2007 02:40 PM

                                                  Okay, I’ll shut up about the excuses and talk about the soup I made over a month ago! Which was WONDERFUL!!! :)

                                                  First off, having had the pleasure to dine at the Zuni Café and make several of the books recipes, I was so EAGER to try something new and wonderful from the book. At first, I was thinking something grand, something big, perhaps a whole meal. In the end though, we hit a REAL cold snap in January and what I really wanted was something WARM and comforting. And so when I passed the page with the Asparagus Rice Soup, I knew it was destined to be the one.

                                                  First off, the one thing I love about her recipes is the approach. Overall the recipes are really simple, but it really is all about the technique. So you start with a standard soup base of sautéed onions

                                                  http://members.aol.com/pmgon/Chowhound/3HC/Melty.jpg

                                                  And add broth with rice. And then you think this is where I start to dump in the Asparagus. No, Judy has you prepare the asparagus separately. Cut in perfect bite sized pieces you cook the asparagus with a good amount of Panchetta (This where I discovered TJ’s carrying little tubs of cubed pancetta… which is not a kitchen staple in our home… YUM!!!

                                                  http://members.aol.com/pmgon/Chowhound/3HC/PerfectPair.jpg

                                                  Of course because the two dishes have to merged together, you cook until they are only slightly wooden. THEN you add it to the soup and allow it all to blend. This is where things get ‘rich’

                                                  http://members.aol.com/pmgon/Chowhound/3HC/Rich.jpg

                                                  This fall/winter I’ve taken it upon myself to cook one soup or stew from each of the cook books we own. It has been quite a rewarding journey! But this soup was by far one of FAVORITES!

                                                  http://members.aol.com/pmgon/Chowhound/3HC/Cuppa.jpg

                                                  And it was all about the technique. The broth as rich because of the onions and pancetta, the aparagus not mushy and wonderfully flavored because of it was cooked along side. At the end, it was truly good to the last drop and dish I TOTALLY recommend!

                                                  http://members.aol.com/pmgon/Chowhound/3HC/DaEnd.jpg

                                                  Recipe:

                                                  http://www.hgtv.com/hgtv/ah_recipes/a...

                                                  --Dommy!

                                                  8 Replies
                                                  1. re: Dommy
                                                    Carb Lover Feb 23, 2007 08:21 PM

                                                    Thanks for your detailed report and photos, Dommy! I can't wait to try making this soup when asparagus starts to pop up at the farmer's market soon. I totally agree on the wonderful techniques in the Zuni book; Judy Rodgers thinks of EVERYTHING and then has the gift of communicating it.

                                                    1. re: Carb Lover
                                                      pitu Feb 26, 2007 06:26 AM

                                                      what she said!
                                                      the cooked down onions are a delicious thread through this book - try that boiled kale soup...
                                                      I make it with cavolo nero, and like it so much that I haven't tried any other kales.

                                                      After the Zuni exposure, I've been making Ceasar salads every Saturday for lunch or dinner, with that day's farmers' market eggs. It's a great winter salad, since nothing is in season but the citrus for the dressing. I tried it with blood orange, and it was nice but not as perfect as the original with lemons.

                                                    2. re: Dommy
                                                      Carb Lover Feb 27, 2007 10:16 PM

                                                      So I saw some asparagus on sale at Safeway today and knew I had to buy some for this soup! I couldn't wait to get home to make it as it's pouring down rain today. Just as Dommy says, this soup is wonderful! Rich yet delicate at the same time. I had a little more asparagus than called for, so I just bumped up the other ingredients proportionally. I didn't have pancetta so substituted bacon. I used arborio rice.

                                                      It was very easy to put together (perfect for a weeknight dinner w/ a salad or crusty bread). The rice cooked more quickly than I anticipated and next time I'll probably cut the asparagus a little thicker, but overall a delicious and warming soup. I found that it needed a good amount of salt at the end for proper seasoning. I don't think to use rice much in soup, but I really liked it. I gilded the lily by grating some parmigiano on top. The recipe says to serve immediately, but I think it tasted better after it sat a little bit.

                                                      Definitely a Zuni keeper; thanks for highlighting it Dommy!

                                                       
                                                      1. re: Carb Lover
                                                        pitu Feb 28, 2007 02:10 AM

                                                        ha! online mindcontrol at work - the asparagus looked irresistable to me too . . .

                                                        1. re: pitu
                                                          pitu Feb 28, 2007 09:00 AM

                                                          so, it was a little bacony for me - luscious, but too too
                                                          (I used good bacon for pancetta, 3.7 oz according to the digital scale)
                                                          in the future I'll cut back the pig, and perhaps make it with mushroom stock and shitakes.
                                                          I love the mushroom stock in the Greens Cookbook.

                                                          And when the asparagus is local..woooooooooooooo......

                                                          1. re: pitu
                                                            Carb Lover Feb 28, 2007 04:05 PM

                                                            Glad you tried it, pitu. I ate some leftovers for lunch, and I agree w/ you that it would taste better w/ less bacon. I know the original recipe calls for pancetta, but I still think that much pancetta would overwhelm the asparagus. I also think that it didn't need that much olive oil. I'm missing non-winter veggies so much that I just want it to be all about the asparagus right now!

                                                            It still tasted good though. It had thickened a bit and instead of thinning w/ some water/stock, I left it as is so it was like a very brothy risotto. Very comforting. I have another bunch of asparagus so may try to make a veggie version w/ mushrooms and some wild rice.

                                                            1. re: Carb Lover
                                                              lollya Mar 1, 2007 07:51 AM

                                                              pitu and carb,
                                                              since you were so sweet to me with all of the advice on the zuni book, here is my favorite asparagus soup for you:

                                                              Fresh Asparagus Soup
                                                              SUBMITTED BY: Nanook
                                                              "A creamy asparagus soup accented with yogurt, lemon, and Parmesan cheese. Everyone loves it! You can substitute soy products to make this recipe vegan." Original recipe yield: 4 servings

                                                              INGREDIENTS

                                                              * 1 pound fresh asparagus
                                                              * 3/4 cup chopped onion
                                                              * 1/2 cup vegetable broth
                                                              * 1 tablespoon butter
                                                              * 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
                                                              * 1 teaspoon salt
                                                              * 1 pinch ground black pepper
                                                              * 1 1/4 cups vegetable broth
                                                              * 1 cup soy milk
                                                              * 1/2 cup yogurt
                                                              * 1 teaspoon lemon juice
                                                              * 1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese

                                                              DIRECTIONS

                                                              1. Place asparagus and onion in a saucepan with 1/2 cup vegetable broth. Bring the broth to a boil, reduce heat and let simmer until the vegetables are tender.
                                                              2. Reserve a few asparagus tips for garnish. Place remaining vegetable mixture in an electric blender and puree until smooth.
                                                              3. Melt butter in the pan that was used for simmering the asparagus and onions. Stir while sprinkling flour, salt, and pepper into the butter. Do not let the flour brown. Allow the mixture to cook only 2 minutes. Stir in remaining 1 1/4 cups vegetable broth and increase the heat. Continue stirring until the mixture comes to a boil.
                                                              4. Stir the vegetable puree and milk into the saucepan. Whisk yogurt into the mixture, followed by lemon juice. Stir until heated through, then ladle into bowls. Garnish with reserved asparagus tips. Sprinkle with Parmesan cheese if desired.

                                                              It's DIVINE.
                                                              I make it with regular milk and it's just fine.
                                                              You could add pancetta or bacon if you like.
                                                              I top with shards of fresh parm, and serve with a garlicked baguette.

                                                              1. re: lollya
                                                                Carb Lover Mar 1, 2007 06:09 PM

                                                                Sounds great! Thanks for taking the time to share.

                                                    3. beetlebug Nov 26, 2007 01:38 PM

                                                      Mixed Lettuces and Greens with Garlic Chapons (pg. 139)

                                                      An extremely simple and delicious salad. I had leftover bread crust (after making the bread salad) and these became the perfect chapons for the salad. I lightly drizzled the crusts with olive oil and kosher salt. These were lightly toasted and then rubbed with a clove of garlic. I broke these into bite sized pieces and drizzled with olive oil and red wine vinegar.

                                                      I used a mixture of mesclun, baby spinach and baby arugula for my lettuce base. The greens were added to the chapons and tossed together with a bit more olive oil, salt and rwvinegar. That's it. Refreshing, simple and delicious. I served this with a butternut squash lasagna.

                                                       
                                                      1 Reply
                                                      1. re: beetlebug
                                                        w
                                                        Westminstress Oct 15, 2013 10:22 AM

                                                        I knew that somewhere I had a recipe that made intentional use of leftover bread crusts (as opposed to the inside part of the stale bread, for which I have many uses). For the life of me, I could not find it. Thanks to this thread popping up, I have! This sounds like a great salad BTW.

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