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Sitram Retro Cookware

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I am looking for a high quality set of stainless. This set may or may noy fit the bill.

Does anyone have any information about this line of Sitram Cookware? I can find it listed on the French Sitram site, but not on the US site. It is being offered now by various sellers, but I can't find out any specifics. Any help is very much appreciated.

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  1. You don't like All-Clad?

    3 Replies
    1. re: Robert Lauriston

      I have never tried All-Clad, although I hear it is very good.

      1. re: percheron

        It's good, but not so much better than Sitram that it's worth the ridiculous prices. When you buy All-Clad, you're footing the bill for their ubiquitous advertisements. I've never heard of the Sitram Retro line though. If it's as cheap as you say it may not be up to the standards of the rest of the Sitram stuff.

        1. re: Buckethead

          Yes, that's exactly what has me wondering. Robert Lauriston comments on his findings below.

    2. Sitram is distributed by Frieling in the U.S. - they don't show the Retro line as available. Sorry!

      1 Reply
      1. re: sodden

        I called Frieling today, and they did not have any info about this line. It is being sold via Amazon. Retro has a copper bottom, is 18/10 stainless - but the question remains - is it any good?.

      2. Sitram is a very good line of stainless steel. They are commercial quality and on par with any of the other high quality lines like All Clad. I am out of town and don't have the information with me but at least one of the lines available in the U.S. has a stainless/copper/stainless "sandwich" on the bottom of the pan. This is a style of construction used by Sitram.

        2 Replies
        1. re: sodden

          All-Clad has a "Copper Core" line, though given how well the basic "Stainless" aluminium-core line works, I don't see the point of paying extra.

          http://206.210.90.92

          1. re: Robert Lauriston

            If you're looking for ease of use, Sitram looks to be the better of the two. If you're only concerned with looks, go for the Mauviel copper.

        2. Just to clarify. Sitram, and others, have a three layer "sandwich" on the bottom of their stainless pots and pans. This aids in the speed and distribution of heat. On version is stainless/aluminum/stainless and the other is stainless/copper/stainless. This is not to be confused with copper pots and pans that have a stainless or tin lining. The multi-layer sandwich improves the use of the product. Sitram is not as well known is the U.S. but is a high quality product and is used in commercial kitchens also. In addition Sitram is made by a French manufacturer - the French have made high quality pots and pans for generations. Sitram has, I believe, four series available in the U.S. that are made in France. They also have two series that are made in China - when I get home I can give you the names of the series and where they are made.

          Regards,

          2 Replies
          1. re: sodden

            Thank you. I do understand that Sitram is quality cookware. If you happen to find any info relating to the "Retro" line, I would love to have it. Amazon is selling it for a very low price, so I am very skeptical.

            1. re: percheron

              Sitram makes all kinds of cookware from cheap to expensive. They don't say on their Web site whether the 10-piece Retro set has a "sandwich" or not. The Amazon listing doesn't mention one. Judging from the picture, my guess is it's similar to Revereware with just a thin layer of copper plating on the bottom. If that's the case, I'm not sure $170 is a great price.

              http://www.sitram.fr/us/nouvo.htm
              http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000...

          2. I don't think it is a "sandwich" either. Bridge said it was similar to Sitram's catering line, in which case it would be the deal of the century. But I agree with you, it is probably like Revereare.

            1. percheron,

              I purchased the retro set from Sams Club about 2 years ago (unfortunatly, they don't sell it any more). I wouldn't say I'm a chef by any means, but I do love to cook and spent the money on a wusthof set of knives. I couldn't see spending the money on an all clad copper set. I wanted some copper for heat conduction.

              The Copper "plate" I'll say is "fused" to the bottom of the cookware. The set is heavy. The small fry pan weighs 1 lb 7 oz, the stock pot weighs 3 lb 10 oz. The sides are thinner than the base. So, the selling point on all clad is that the pans have an even thickness through out. These do not. Personally, if I had it to do all over again, I would still get the Sitram Retro. Apart from the knives, wok and gas stove it's one of the best purchases i've made for the kitchen.

              Feel free to contact me if you have first hand questions, to get answered.

              2 Replies
              1. re: chem_fun

                From the photos that's copper plating. The set is heavy because it has a thick stainless-steel base.

                1. re: chem_fun

                  Hi Chem Fun,
                  Does food stick to the pans? Is it hard to clean? I am interested in your opinion, thank you for your reply!

                2. I e-mailed the manufacturer in France about the Retro line. It is NOT sold in the U.S. So, don't know where someone is getting it for Amazon. Remember, Amazon links to many other distributors. As for the advantage of All Clad being the same thickness all around, Sitram and other French manufacturers commonly use the "sandwich" on the bottom of the pan. This is three layers - stainless, copper or aluminum, stainless - which helps in the heat distribution. These are commercial quality and used in kitchens for restaurants. The All Clad comment is pure marketing.

                  1. Percheron,

                    When you heat the pan gently prior to cooking, and then add a layer of olive oil to the pan with either a towel (or I use a pump spray) it's near non stick. Yet, with proper heating you can brown things quite nicely. Do throw mine in the dish washer, and generally the come clean the first time. If I have that stuborn burn spot that didn't get blasted off, of if I want to polish the copper to make them look new again (I have them hanging in the kitchen), I use bar keepers friend and they shine right up. Season them again and you're ready to cook. Only thing I got a non-sitck pan for was eggs.