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Cooking classes in Toronto or area

m
married2foodie Dec 19, 2006 04:52 PM

Looking for enjoyable cooking class(s) as an anniversary gift for an experienced chowhound, who has attended some of the Bonnie Stern classes, is reasonably skilled, any suggestions?

  1. pescatarian Dec 19, 2006 06:05 PM

    Here's The Star's annual list of cooking classes:

    http://www.thestar.com/Food/article/1...

    1. Cereal Killer Dec 19, 2006 06:11 PM

      Yikes - can't beat that response. Nice one.

      2 Replies
      1. re: Cereal Killer
        m
        married2foodie Dec 19, 2006 06:38 PM

        Thanks, however this is a VERY long list. Does anyone have any experience with any of these, or is comfortable recommending one?

        1. re: married2foodie
          pescatarian Dec 19, 2006 06:58 PM

          George Brown's hands-on courses are generally very good.

          Two that aren't on this list that I've had experience with are Shashi's vegetarian indian cooking - http://www.indiancooking.ca/
          She teaches from her private home and she is quite sweet. It reminded me of cooking with my grandmother, but also good for basic Indian techniques.
          I have been to a couple functions at Great Cooks on 8: http://www.greatcooks.ca/
          They can be fun.

      2. s
        SusanB Dec 19, 2006 07:11 PM

        I think Sushi Marche (sushi place on Queen east of Pape) offers classes. I can't imagine making it - much easier to pick up!

        1 Reply
        1. re: SusanB
          nummanumma Dec 19, 2006 07:18 PM

          nella on Bathurst (north of bloor) is well regarded and offers classes...I can't vouche for them personally, but it may be worth checking out.

        2. s
          storeman Dec 19, 2006 08:46 PM

          Try loblaws they have cooking classes in either the Loblaws or Super centre stores

          http://www.loblaws.ca/en/cooking_and_...

          1. c
            cheesymama Dec 20, 2006 12:49 AM

            A friend has done a couple at Calphalon on King at Spadina. He really enjoyed them, and I think that the skill level is a little higher than you would get at Loblaws. Also, Dish on Dupont used to do them, haven't looked into it in a while, or if he likes chocolate JS Bonbons offers chocolate making classes.
            Great gift, why does my husband never think of this for me?!?

            1. spades Dec 20, 2006 01:08 AM

              I have taken a few classes at George Brown and can definitely vouch for the quality of the evening programme. The best part is that sometimes not all of the students show up to the practical part or leave early after the demonstration, and you get to take extra ingredients home. I also like how the instructors are so hands on and willing to help you out in the kitchen.

              1 Reply
              1. re: spades
                t
                Tour boi Dec 20, 2006 04:03 AM

                I too am a George Brown part time culinary student. I totally enjoy the hands on. I next want to take the northern Italian cooking course or the French Farm house cooking. Tour boi

              2. w
                wildstylechef Dec 20, 2006 05:12 AM

                Hi

                Up in Stouffville there is Frank Cutrara that hosts the groups in his home with a kitchen to die for. A professional chef that owned his own pastry company then worked for the best golf courses in Canada. I worked with Frank as I am a Professional Certified Chef de Cuisine I attended one of his courses and he is in a league of his own.
                http://fcutrara.com/

                1. orangewasabi Dec 22, 2006 01:09 PM

                  My husband & I have had an excellent experiences at Calphalon. I would not recommend these for a newbie but they are excellent for an moderately experienced cook.

                  We did the knife course, the sauce course and I held an office party there where we did the New Orleans Menu.

                  We liked it more than most for two reasons -- the wine service and the number of dishes/techniques covered. The next one we want to do is the Unami one (with beaucoup de mushroom dishes).

                  1. l
                    lovemyfood Dec 23, 2006 04:31 AM

                    I prefer great cooks on eight.They are reasonable and professional.

                    1. c
                      coimbra1012 Jun 21, 2011 09:01 AM

                      If you're really into pizza here is a four days hands-on pizza course:

                      http://www.pizzaschool.ca/

                      1 Reply
                      1. re: coimbra1012
                        b
                        b_low Jun 24, 2011 10:18 AM

                        Hi there,

                        I would highly reccomend Dish Studio on Dupont, went there for a 'team-building' thing through work and had a great time, and amazing dishes! A very fun environment as well!

                        http://dishcookingstudio.com/zf/publi...

                      2. danionavenue Jun 24, 2011 12:03 PM

                        I took GB Intro to Culinary Arts 1 this year. It was once a week, from 6-10 PM. I really liked it and I learned a lot. There were some good cooks and then there were some people who had never cooked in my class. I really liked my instructor. You bring home a lot of food every week. It did cost $600 and I spent another couple hundred on supplies needed for the class. You get a uniform with the cost of the class which is required for all cooking classes. Now that I have the uniform and utensils the next classes I take will only be around $400.

                        2 Replies
                        1. re: danionavenue
                          h
                          hungryabbey Jun 24, 2011 03:21 PM

                          I took it this year too, and honestly, I didn't learn much... Yes, I liked having food to bring home, but I felt liek the recipes were so basic that it was a waste of time. I probably picked up maybe 1-2 tips I didnt know.. otherwise, I feel like if you can follow a recipe, you pretty much got it all. I would have learned just as much reading the recipes, and watching FN... but maybe that was just my instructor.

                          1. re: hungryabbey
                            t
                            torontofoodiegirl Jun 24, 2011 03:56 PM

                            I took Culinary Arts 1 several years ago, and enjoyed it, but agree with hungryabbey that it's pretty basic. We had people in our class with a real range of cooking skills, including absolute beginners (eg. a guy who didn't know that raw shrimp are grey and only turn pink when cooked). I suspect that some of the more specialized George Brown courses would be more appropriate for cooks with some experience in the kitchen.

                        2. b
                          balthazar Jun 24, 2011 03:36 PM

                          I enjoyed a Calphalon cooking class: completely hands-on (everyone cooked at the same time), nice recipes and a great chance to use/learn to use premium cooking tools (talk about knife and pan envy, which is obviously why it's great for Calphalon). I like that they have one-off classes so you don't have to commit to a program.

                          I also enjoyed an Indian cooking class with Arvinda's http://www.hgic.ca/ . Good recipes, and a nice approach to home cooking Indian food. I would have preferred a more hands-on class (it was mostly demonstration, with volunteers helping out here and there), but I still enjoyed it.

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