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Home Sausage Making

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  • adam Dec 18, 2006 08:42 PM
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I searched the boards, and found some useful info, but am looking for a bit more . . .

I just got, for the holidays, a meat grinder, sausage stuffer, some seasonings, and some natural casings.

I am very excited - have been wanting to make some sausage for a while - but would love some direction.

Anyone have any general tips/thoughts? Specific recipes? Favorite combinations? Is it worth getting a book like Ruhlman's Charcuterie, or will that mostly be for cured meats as opposed to what I will be doing?

Thanks in advance. (I am in NY if anyone has any location-specific suggestions for places to get certain ingredients, etc.)

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  1. See if you can find a copy of Aidells and Kelly's Hot Links and Country Flavor. It came out in teh Knopf Cooks American in 1990. It will be a great book to get you started. Really good recipes and instruction.

    1. If you're in New York City, you can get additional sausage casings (and the pork and pork fat as well) at Esposito Pork Shop at 500 9th Avenue at 38th Street.

      2 Replies
      1. re: JoanN

        funny - i live right near there, and it's where my girlfriend got the casings for me. it is indeed a great butcher shop, and an excellent resource.

        1. re: adam

          Lucky you. I'm not anywhere near there, but it's always my first stop when I'm on a sausage-making spree. More than worth the travel time and subway fare.

      2. Len Poli's web site is a gold mine of *reliable* information on making sausages at home. Useful for novice to expert. The recipes have always worked out well for me; get lots of compliments, and very few leftovers. Very highly recommended.
        http://home.pacbell.net/lpoli/

        You'll also find a very good recipe for brining your own corned beef. I like mine a little spicier, but Len's recipe is delicious as is, and dead easy.

        I've also found this book to be among the most useful sausage-making resources on my shelf.
        http://www.amazon.com/Home-Sausage-Ma...

        I'm not familiar with the book you mention, but I'd hold off on cured/dried sausages until I had a bit more experience with making fresh ones. There's also some specific equipment requirements for those types sausages. The resources that other posters and I have provided will fill you in.

        Allied Kenco is a good online or mail-order source of equipment and materials. Their site has some useful information also. Worth a look even if you're not buying.
        http://www.alliedkenco.com/catalog/in...

        Good luck, and enjoy your sausages!

        1. Ruhlman's Charcuterie is a wonderful book to have anyway. His chapter on sausage is well done. I would also recommend: "Home Sausage Making" by Susan Mahnke Peery, Storey Publishing, 2003. "The Art of Making Sausages, Pates and Other Charcuterie" by Jane Grigson, Alfred Knopf, 1976, out of print but you can probably find a copy on line. The "Chez Panisse Cafe Cookbook" also has some very nice sausage recipes.

          Sausage making is fun, economical and you can make some really good eats. Have Fun!
          Bruce

          1. Also take a peek at Bruce Aidell's Complete Sausage...

            http://www.amazon.com/Bruce-Aidellss-...

            There's a fun webring that will open LOTS of web doors. But be careful with some of the dried/uncooked sausage recipes some of the cyber-yahoos have posted; I've seen some bad microbial violations. If you're not going to cook your product up to 160, consult a refereed printbook edition.

            http://b.webring.com/hub?ring=sausage...

            1 Reply
            1. re: FoodFuser

              "But be careful with some of the dried/uncooked sausage recipes some of the cyber-yahoos have posted; I've seen some bad microbial violations."

              Yeah. I've never tried it myself you understand, but I hear botulism is pretty nasty.

            2. Buy a book and follow it closely until you become familiar with the process. Most websites give proportions but not technique. Start with a simple unstuffed sausage and go from there. We like most of the books above and Zuni has a good chapter as well.