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Prime Rib Roasting

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Lorenz Dec 5, 2006 11:36 AM

Intend to roast rack of rib for the holidays. Must have found a zillion different ways to roast it. High temp - short time, low temp-long time, even roast an hour shut off oven and leave in oven for a few hours.

What's the tried and true or is rack of rib so versatile to roast ?

Thanks

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  1. Karl S RE: Lorenz Dec 5, 2006 12:04 PM

    Here's a helpful starter link from a discussion from one year ago:

    http://www.chowhound.com/topics/281414

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      cooknKate RE: Lorenz Dec 5, 2006 12:53 PM

      There is lots of good advice on that old post. Since no one touched on the true reason for resting meat after cooking, I will offer this explanation. When heated up, the muscle fibers in the meat expand, pushing all the juices to the exterior of the meat. By allowing the meat to rest after taking it out of the oven, the muscle fibers relax, and the juices are redistributed throughout. There is no magic formula for how long it needs to happen because no matter how long it sits, you will still have juices come out when you slice. But, it is safe to say that the longer you can allow it to sit, the better.

      1 Reply
      1. re: cooknKate
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        FlyFish RE: cooknKate Dec 5, 2006 02:39 PM

        Herve This discusses the resting of roasts in his book Molecular Gastronomy. In actuality, there is very little redistribution of fluids in a roast as it cooks - the outside becomes dry through evaporation and the inside remains essentially unchanged because it doesn't really get all that hot. The resting period allows moisture that was naturally present (i.e., not forced there during cooking, as some claim) in the center of the roast to redistribute toward the periphery, thereby remoistening and tenderizing the drier outer parts.

      2. HaagenDazs RE: Lorenz Dec 5, 2006 01:03 PM

        A probe thermometer does some of it's best work in a rib roast, I think. $20 will make you look like a pro.

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          CDouglas RE: Lorenz Dec 5, 2006 02:03 PM

          I take Alton Brown's recipe and tweak it a bit. I don't use the terra cotta pot and pull the roast at 122 degrees before revving the oven up to 500. The sage jus is amazing as well.

          http://www.foodnetwork.com/food/recip...

          1. carswell RE: Lorenz Dec 5, 2006 02:09 PM

            Julia Child's method is, of course, foolproof:

            www.chowhound.com/topics/show/320928#...

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