HOME > Chowhound > Home Cooking >

Discussion

Slicing Avocado- the fast, no-muss way

  • 7

Maybe there are many CH peo. who know this technique, but I want to share it with those who might find it new and useful.

Slice your ripe avocado in half lengthwise. Insert the edge of a small sharp knife into the pit and pull out the pit from the flesh(serrated knife works best for this.)
Holding the avocado half in your palm, slice lengthwise through the flesh, just down to the skin, in straight parallel lines,1/3 "- 1/2" apart. If you want cubes,after slicing lengthwise, slice crosswise in parallel lines 1/2 " apart, cutting just down to the skin. now insert an oval soupspoon into the flesh, right next to the skin, and scoop out the whole half of the avocado. separate the flesh into its slices or cubes. eat whatever you didn't get in your scoop!

if you only need part of the avocado, leave the pit in (this supposedly helps it from discoloring), rejoin the 2 halves, put in sealed plastic bag or container, and refrigerate. use in 1-2 dys.

  1. Click to Upload a photo (10 MB limit)
Delete
  1. Maybe it's because avocadoes are relatively easy to work with in the first place. Now, if you had posted a foolproof method to shuck oysters...

    I think your crosshatching-followed-by-scooping method is much better applied to mangoes. This is how I already deal with mangoes, which are actually hard to peel, as opposed to avocadoes. It seems to me that if you do the scooping thing with avocado flesh you will take off some of that pretty darker green outer bit and end up with uneven slices - not so with firmer mango flesh.

    Finally, you neglected to mention that after sticking the tip of a serrated knife into an avocado pit, the easiest way to dislodge it is to give the knife a small twist - the pit pops right out.

    Sorry - you asked, I answered :)

    1. Hahaha. I knew the technique but spooned and sliced. I have an avacado for tonight and will try the slice and spoon. Thanks!

      1. you get much cleaner avocado slices if you use a paring knife to peel off the skin. cut in half, remove the pit (knife blade method as described above), turn it cut side down and start peeling from the narrow end. as long as it's not overly ripe, the skin will pull off easily and no flesh remains in the peel.

        1. regarding the avacado pit and discoloration: Harold McGee did an experiment with an avacado pit and a light bulb - both worked equeally well. Which is to say they don't do that much. One way to keep guacamole/mashed avacado from turning brown for up to 24 hours is to press Saran Wrap directly onto the surface - this keeps any air from interacting with it. Saran Wrap is superior to any of its competitors in this regard (once again, thank you H. McGee)

          1. i knew someone would answer that hidden trap-for-correct-info!!
            thanks much for that;now i know.

            as for clean slices, my technique results in PERFECT slices; and no bits of shell attached! when you peel an avocado, you are wasting your time, and the avocado. guaranteed! ("vote for me 'cause i'm always right and i never lie."- dear one's family expression)

            1 Reply
            1. re: opinionatedchef

              I'm not saying bits of shell would be attached - I'm wondering how you would avoid leaving bits of flesh on the shell.

            2. if you are a 'clean spooner', you'll get 99% of the flesh in one go, without leaving it in the shell.

              1. I'm not normally into one function gadgets but I gave one of those avocado slicers to my sister for her birthday since she loves avocados. She swears by it, perfect, same width slices every time.