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Ponche Recipe?

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I need some good ideas for a ponche caliente (with fresh fruits in it) for a mid-holiday party we are planning.
Muchas gracias

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  1. This is what I will be using this holiday season:

    http://www.foodnetwork.com/food/recip...

    1 Reply
    1. re: Eat_Nopal

      Thanks, Eat Nopal, I saved that to use as a guide to a ponche.

    2. Mine's similar...the recipe was given to me by a neighbor here in Guadalajara:

      Ponche de Frutas (Hot Fruit Punch)
      1 pound tejocotes (Mexican crab apples, in season now)
      4 pounds caña (sugar cane)
      3 pounds pears, peeled, seeded, and cut into eighths
      3 pounds fresh guavas, peeled and halved
      3 pounds granulated sugar
      2 pounds raisins
      3 sticks (1 foot long) cinnamon
      1 orange peel, diced
      2 whole cloves
      7 quarts water (1 quart separate use)
      Rum to taste

      Bring the extra quart of water to a boil. Add the tejocotes and bring back to a boil. As soon as the pot boils, remove it from the heat. Remove the skins, hard ends, and seeds from the tejocotes.

      Bring the six remaining quarts of water to boil in a large pot. Meanwhile, peel the sugar cane and cut it into pieces approximately 1" long and 1/4" wide, and prepare the other fruits.

      When the water boils, add the tejocotes and let them boil for 45 minutes or until tender.

      Add the pears to the boiling water. Be sure that you have cut away the heart of the pear and removed all seeds.

      After a half hour, add the sugar and return to a boil. Add the diced orange peel and the cinnamon sticks, then the raisins and the cloves. Allow the mixture to simmer for approximately 15 minutes longer.

      Add rum as desired to each person's cup and serve the punch hot. Be certain that each cup contains some of all of the fruits.

      (You can serve this punch with tequila or charanda instead of rum.)

      Makes approximately 30 servings.

      6 Replies
      1. re: cristina

        Hi Cristina,

        I haven't had Charanda since I was 15, what do you think of it does it compare to decent brandy?

        Saludos

        1. re: Eat_Nopal

          Hi EN...charanda (pure cane alcohol) is much rougher and has more kick than any brandy I've tried. Charanda will certainly cure what ails you, though. I've tried white lightnin' out of a Mason jar--that's what charanda reminds me of.

          I much prefer rum in my ponche, and the rum I prefer is Nicaraguan Flor de Caña Oro.

          Saludos cordiales

          1. re: cristina

            Speaking of Rums... are aged Rums "in" in Mexico? Or does Tequila still dominate the spirits world?

            1. re: Eat_Nopal

              I think that here in Mexico the three most popular distilled spirits are tequila (there are literally hundreds of brands, some extremely pricey and some very inexpensive, with most falling in the mid-range), brandy (Domecq Presidente), and Buchanan's Scotch whiskey. Rum, usually blanco or añejo, is predominately used for *una cubita, por favor* or as a piquete in ponche or te de canela.

              1. re: cristina

                Speaking of piquete... last time I was in Mexico, I couldn't find Alcohol de Cana.... is it illegal now?

                1. re: Eat_Nopal

                  You can get it...it's made not too far from where I live. This company makes it for drinking and for medicinal (external) purposes.

                  http://www.alcoholera-zapopan.com/alc...

      2. I'm not Cristina, but the only charanda I've had was $25 MXP a bottle, and it was just heavily sweetened cane spirits. Really boring. Undoubtedly there are better.

        1. this ponche was a hit during the holidays.

          ponche navideño (christmas punch)
          prep time: 20 minutes
          cooking time: 1 hour
          serves: 24

          1-1/4 cups dark brown sugar (not packed)
          10-12 cups water
          2 cups dried apricots, halved (substituted for tejocotes, which you may be able to find at a hispanic market)
          2 cups fresh guavas, quartered
          2 fresh pomegranates, cut in half
          2 cups pitted plums, halved
          3/4 cup sugarcane, cut into 1-inch pieces (i left mine whole; it was hard to cut)
          1 cup dark rum

          dissolve the sugar in the water and add the fruit and sugarcane. heat and simmer gently until the fruit is cooked through, about 1 hour.
          add the rum and serve hot.

          adapted from “the mexican mama’s kitchen” by sofía larrinúa-craxton