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German Potato Dumpling

Anyone know how to make these from scratch? The starchy, ugly, beige softballs Germans serve with boiled meat or sauerbraten. I miss them. Cold fall eves demand them.

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  1. I don't have personal experience with these, but I love any kind of dumplings so I did a Google search, and here's what I found, among other links:

    http://www.cuisinedumonde.com/kartoff...
    http://www.recipezaar.com/59894
    http://recipes.epicurean.com/recipe/2...
    http://www.cooks.com/rec/search/0,1-0...

    Sarah C

    1 Reply
    1. re: kittyfood

      Sarah, Thank you so much for the links. I love that recipezaar! Coincidentally, recipezaar's recipe looks like the real deal. I knew there was bread involved. I will definitely be having that this week since temps are tumbling here this week.

    2. they're not ugly! german food has bad PR. unfortunately, i don't have any recipes, by the ones provided by kittyfood above look pretty spot on. but say rather, "comforting and delicious."

      1 Reply
      1. re: augustiner

        Comforting and delicious for sure! German food is king to me especially in the cold months. I think I will stand by the ugly, but will add perhaps... scrumpdillyishis!

      2. are you talking about kartoffelklossel? try Mimi Sheraton's the German Cookbook

        1. Here's my mom's recipe:
          GERMAN POTATO DUMPLINGS

          2 LBS LARGE POTATOES 4 OZ WHITE BREAD
          1/4 CUP ALL PURPOSE FLOUR 1/4 CUP BUTTER
          1/4 CUP SEMOLINA (FARINA) DASH GRATED NUTMEG (OPTIONAL)
          1/2 TSP SALT

          IF POSSIBLE, COOK POTATOES THE DAY BEFORE. WASH BUT DO NOT PEEL POTATOES & PLACE THEM IN A SAUCEPAN OF BOILING WATER. SIMMER GENTLY FOR 20 - 30 MINUTES OR UNTIL DONE. DRAIN & LET STAND OVERNIGHT. PEEL & MASH OR GRATE POTATOES. PLACE IN A BOWL & MIX IN FLOUR, SALT, NUTMEG & SEMOLINA TO FORM SMOOTH DOUGH. IF NEEDED, ADD A LITTLE MORE FLOUR. WITH FLOURED FINGERS, SHAPE THE MIXTURE INTO 8 LARGE DUMPLINGS & SET ASIDE ON A FLOURED SURFACE. CUT BREAD INTO CUBES. MELT BUTTER IN A HEAVY SAUCEPAN & GENTLY SAUTE THE CUBES UNTIL PALE GOLDEN BROWN. EASE THE DUMPLINGS OPEN & PLACE 3 TO 4 CUBES IN THE CENTER OF EACH DUMPLING. SEAL UP THE OPENING & COMPLETELY ENCLOSING THE CUBES. FILL A LARGE SAUCEPAN 3/4 FULL WITH SALTED WATER. BRING TO BOIL, ADD DUMPLINGS, THEN REDUCE HEAT & SIMMER FOR 20 MINUTES OR UNTIL ALL DUMPLINGS RISE TO THE TOP. REMOVE THE DUMPLINGS WITH PERFORATED SPOON & DRAIN ON A PLATE BEFORE SERVING. SERVE HOT WITH EITHER VEAL OR BEEF GOULASH OR SAUERBRATEN. SERVES 4 TO 6.

          20 Replies
          1. re: RichK

            Yeah, crouton in the center... that sounds familiar. Thank you so much for typing in that recipe. I copied it to my own recipes and cannot wait to give it a go. I think I will start with floury potatoes like russets and move starchier unless you say otherwise. Thanks again! Making roasted pork and veggies tomorrow with lots of gravy. I cannot wait to eat these!

            1. re: Wanda Fuca

              If you love these, you'd also love my mom's recipe for Bavarian Bread Dumplings!! Goes really good with goulash.
              Let me know and I'll post it too.

              1. re: RichK

                Well, since when I read "Bavarian Bread Dumplings" I actually drooled... Lay it on me mister!

                1. re: Wanda Fuca

                  OK here's that recipe:
                  BAVARIAN BREAD DUMPLINGS

                  18 SLICES WHITE BREAD(2 DAYS OLD) 1 PINT MILK
                  1 LARGE ONION 2 TBLS BUTTER OR MARGARINE
                  2-3 TBLS PARSLEY DASH FRESH GRATED NUTMEG
                  2 EXTRA LARGE EGGS
                  1 CUP BREAD CRUMBS
                  1 1/2 TBLS FLOUR SALT & PEPPER TO TASTE

                  POUR SOME OF THE MILK INTO SMALL BOWL; (ADD MILK AS NEEDED) PUT 1 SLICE OF BREAD IN AT A TIME. SOAK & PRESS RIGHT OUT; PLACE PRESSED BREAD IN LARGE BOWL. REPEAT UNTIL ALL BREAD SLICES HAVE BEEN SOAKED & PRESSED OUT. PEEL & FINELY CHOP ONION; SAUTE IN BUTTER OR MARGARINE UNTIL GLAZED (NOT BROWN). PLACE ASIDE UNTIL COOL. FINELY CHOP PARSLEY. WHEN ONIONS ARE COOL, ADD WITH PARSLEY TO PRESSED BREAD. BREAK IN EGGS & SEASONINGS. MIX THOROUGHLY. ADD BREADCRUMBS & FLOUR AND MIX AGAIN. (IF DOUGH IS TOO SOFT, ADD A LITTLE MORE BREADCRUMBS). FILL A LARGE POT 3/4 FULL WITH WATER, ADD SALT & BRING TO A BOIL. WET HANDS & FORM DOUGH INTO BASEBALL SIZED DUMPLINGS & ADD TO BOILING WATER. REPEAT UNTIL ALL DOUGH IS GONE. REDUCE HEAT & SIMMER. DUMPLINGS ARE DONE WHEN THEY RISE TO TOP. SERVES 6

                  1. re: RichK

                    Hey Wanda,
                    If you're interested, I have my mom's goulash recipe and also her bavarian red cabbage recipe.
                    Both of these are drop dead good. I grew up on her cooking and now I make her recipes for my family, especially in the winter.

                      1. re: chocodile

                        OK here goes and let me know how they come out:
                        BAVARIAN BEEF GOULASH

                        3 LBS BEEF (CHUCK OR STEW MEAT) 3 TBLS OLIVE OIL
                        2 1/2 TBLS BUTTER OR MARGARINE 1 TBLS SALT
                        2 BEEF BOULLION CUBES
                        PEPPER TO TASTE
                        2 TBLS SWEET PAPRIKA
                        2 TO 3 MEDIUM ONIONS
                        1 TO 2 TSP SUGAR
                        2 TBLS CORNSTARCH
                        1 CUP RED OR WHITE WINE

                        CUT MEAT INTO 1" CUBES. IN A LARGE SAUCEPAN, HEAT OIL & ADD BUTTER. ADD MEAT & BROWN ALL THE PIECES. REMOVE MEAT & KEEP WARM. PEEL & CHOP ONIONS & PUT IN SAUCEPAN; SAUTE UNTIL GOLDEN BROWN. DEGLAZE PAN WITH 1 CUP WINE & 2 CUPS WATER; ADD BOULLION CUBES. WHEN DEGLAZED, ADD MEAT & ALL SEASONINGS & BRING TO BOIL FOR 1 MINUTE. TURN DOWN HEAT & SIMMER FOR 1 1/2 HRS. TASTE GRAVY & SEASON TO TASTE. MIX CORNSTARCH WITH SOME WATER UNTIL SMOOTH & STIR INTO MEAT & GRAVY. IF GRAVY GETS TOO THICK, STIR IN A LITTLE HOT WATER. BRING TO BOIL FOR 2 MINUTES & SERVE. SERVES 6.
                        And here's the Red Cabbage:
                        BAVARIAN RED CABBAGE

                        1 RED CABBAGE 2 TO 2 1/2 LBS. 1/4 CUP BUTTER
                        3 TBLS SUGAR
                        6 TBLS RED WINE VINEGAR
                        3-4 CLOVES
                        2-3 MEDIUM APPLES
                        1 ONION DASH SALT & PEPPER TO TASTE

                        DISCARD THE COARSE OUTER LEAVES OF THE CABBAGE, QUARTER & CUT AWAY THE HARD CENTER CORE. FINELY SHRED THE CABBAGE, WASH & DRAIN. IN A LARGE SAUCEPAN, MELT BUTTER & PUT IN CABBAGE AND SALT & PEPPER TO TASTE AND THE CLOVES. PEEL & CORE THE APPLES AND SLICE THEM VERY THIN AND PUT THEM ON TOP OF THE CABBAGE. DO THE SAME WITH THE ONION. ADD SUGAR & VINEGAR. COVER & SIMMER, MIXING IT IN BETWEEN, UNTIL DONE. ADD MORE VINEGAR TO TASTE IF NEEDED. SERVES 6.

                        1. re: RichK

                          My mother always added a small teaspoon full of carraway seeds to her red cabbage.

                          1. re: RichK

                            On Sunday night, I took your recipes and made a German feast (perfect in this nasty rainy weather we have been having in Portland). I made the potato dumplings, the beef goulash, and the cabbage. Everything was great. The cabbage nearly brought tears of joy to my husband's eyes, as it was a perfect replica of what our German friend made for us when we visited. I think what I have been missing in my attempts is the apple, perhaps? Yummy leftovers too- good lunches this week. I do have a question, though. The dumpling recipe calls for simmering the dumplings for 20 min or until all have risen to the surface. My dumplings rose in about 3 minutes. Should I have taken them out then? I let them go a bit longer, but took them out at 10 min or so because I was afraid they were disintegrating.
                            Also, do you have a recommendation for a good German cookbook- something with simple homestyle cooking, preferably with regional recipes?

                            1. re: chocodile

                              Chocodile,
                              Well the recipe calls for 20 mins, but I too take them out sooner if I think they are done. I usually take one out and check it (no one has to know lol). If it tastes right and the texture is right, then their done.
                              BTW did you make the red cabbage? I find that it seems to tast better the day after I make it so I usually cook it the day before.
                              And thanks for reporting back.
                              As far as the German cookbook, I only have my mom's recipes that she handed down to me. I would check Amazon or a place down south called "Alpen Land", you can google them. I have seen recipe books in their catalogues.

                              1. re: RichK

                                I did make the cabbage and it was fantastic. I was lucky enough to have leftovers- both the cabbage and the beef were great the next day. If you ever feel like posting more of your favorites from Mom, I'd love to have the recipes. Thanks for posting these, they go into my keepers folder.

                              2. re: chocodile

                                This entire post makes me very homesick for my Bavarian mother in law's cooking. She puts an apple in her red cabbage, and i'm pretty sure caraway too. Maybe also ground coriander?

                                We did the lazy vegetarian version of these feasts today for a late lunch. Spaten (giant spaetzle) with lentil stew.

                              3. re: RichK

                                Love your recipes!

                                BTW, even though I now use ground cloves in my red cabbage - goes quicker, I remember my mutti always cut the onion in half and poked the whole cloves in the cut side of the onion. That way, at the end of the cooking time, she could remove the onion with the cloves. That way one wouldn't accidentally bite down on one of the cloves.

                          2. re: RichK

                            hmmm... these dumplings have possibilities! I may have to make these tomorrow as well and do a little comparing. Any excuse to snarf down a couple dumplings. Thanks for the recipe!

                            1. re: Wanda Fuca

                              Trust me, the bread dumplings are easy to make and go well with any dish that has GRAVY.
                              I also like to make the red cabbage a day before serving it. It seems to gain in taste.
                              Please let me know how you make out.

                              1. re: RichK

                                Aren't you sweet. I actually make red cabbage and make my mom's recipe. Pretty close to yours except there is apple juice and onion. Goulash demands spaetzle. This is an EXCELLENT goulash (I do not know where I got it, but YUM).
                                2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
                                4 cups onions, thinly sliced
                                1 tablespoon sugar
                                3 garlic cloves, minced
                                1 tablespoon caraway seeds, toasted and ground
                                1/2 tablespoons sweet paprika
                                1 teaspoon spicy paprika
                                2 tablespoons minced fresh marjoram leaves
                                1 teaspoon minced fresh thyme leaves
                                1 bay leaf
                                3 tablespoons tomato paste
                                2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
                                4 cups chicken stock
                                2 1/2 pounds beef shank, cut into 2-inch cubes
                                1 teaspoon kosher salt
                                1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
                                In a large saute pan, heat the olive oil and saute the onions and sugar until caramelized. Add the garlic and caraway seed. Cook for 1 minute. Add the sweet and sharp paprika, marjoram, thyme, and bay leaf. Saute another minute, until fragrant. Add the tomato paste. Deglaze with the vinegar and the stock and add the pieces of beef shank, salt, and pepper. Bring to a boil, then lower to a simmer and cook until very tender, about 1 1/2 hours, stirring occasionally. Taste and adjust seasoning with salt and pepper. Better following day. Serve with spaetzle on the side. Sometimes I sneak potatoes in so it can be like roadside goulash.

                                We should start a Traditional German/ Austrian/ Hungarian food for cool weather Post!!!

                                1. re: RichK

                                  Rich - Sorry for the delay in getting back to you on how things went. We had two days of German food. Day one was roasted pork, gravy, veggies and your mother's amazing dumplings. And they were so good... fluffy, yet sturdy. Absolutely phenomenal. We polished the leftover dumplings off before midnight. Yes, Oink. Day two we had a few friends over who had stopped by our house the night before and saw the dumplings. They came with Weisswurst in a cute German terrine and served with a curry sauce and a calves tongue with horseradish sauce. They brought along saurkraut that they made from the cabbage from their garden and apples we had given them wrapped in bacon. Both were surprisingly delicious. We heated up the pork, made some more dumplings and the Bavarian bread dumplings and thawed out some beans from our garden and steamed them. Ya godda have some green... For the beer (I am getting to that) I made some homemade pretzels and for dessert I ran to Safeway and got a Blackforest cake. The other couple brought some great German wines and several kinds of beer. The Paulaner pils beer was awesome. They also brought us over some hops from Bavaria called Hallertau. My husband is a brewmiester so they brought it as a gift. Never have I seen this man in more glory.

                                  Thanks you so much for the recipes, both were amazing and loved all the way around and they made for a great reason to get together with friends.

                        2. re: Wanda Fuca

                          Russets will probably be OK but I usually use just white Maine round potatoes.

                        3. re: RichK

                          I think the objective here is to have dry potatoes right? When I make gnocci I bake the potatoes and not boil them. Would this work for these potato balls? I have the sauerbrauten marinating for 5 days and plan to make my German meal Tuesday including the red cabbage and potato balls. Thanks for your recipes.

                          1. re: MawaRosie

                            My German mother made potato dumplings often, sometimes from the Panni mix, adding the buttered croutons. The taste is practically identical to that of potato gnocchi. If she had known of such a thing I'm sure she'd have bought frozen gnocchi and saved a lot of work.

                        4. I once got busted at customs coming out of Austria because I tried to bring home some potatoes for dumplings---I think theirs have more gluten in them, because they make better dumplings. I agree with the Mimi Sheraton German Cookbook---wunderbar. By the way, Wanda Fuca, I once had a dog named "Puget Hound!"
                          mothrpoet

                          1 Reply
                          1. re: mothrpoet

                            Puget Hound... that is so freaking cute! I may have to steal that! Speaking of food smuggling... I once packed a whole carry on with Nestle "YES" bars (they are only available in Euro). I would have packed more, but my husband was giving me the hairy eyeball because we were only half way through the trip. I did not want to chance mailing them since I thought they might melt. The customs guy thought I was insane. If you go back to Austria and you like hazelnut chocolate and genoise cake... HEAVEN.... OINK!