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Honeycrisp Apple - A Review

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I just had the best apple I have ever had. It was a Honeycrisp purchased from Oliver's Market (Montecito Blvd in S.R.) about 8 days ago...

It looks like a Fuji but with a deeper red coloring. Like a Fuji it provides contrasting sweetness & tartness but at a whole other level. It also has a substantial firmness about it... and it gushes out with every bite... very, very juicy.

I am not a big apple fan... but this was one specimen I can really... a truly well balanced & delicious pleasure that doesn't require any Bleu Cheese or Pie Crust for enjoyment.

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  1. I used to get these all the time at the farmers market in Baltimore, and now I've seen them at Safeway stores in Northern California. I'm very particular about my apples (learned to love them in Washington State). Glad to hear they are out there.

    1. I had honey crispt apple recently too. I definitely agree with you. It's more on the sweet side with a mild tart taste. It lives up to it's name. I tried a New Zealand Jazz apple a couple months ago which was also tasty; it had a completely different sweetness and tartness ratio and also very crispy. Have these apples always been around?

      1. I found online that the Honeycrisp variety was developed by the University of Minnesota from a Macoun and Honeygold cross (the Honeygold is a cross between the Golden Delicious and Haralson). This new apple variety was introduced in 1991 and is growing in popularity.

        2 Replies
        1. re: Non Cognomina

          Ah, Macouns. What McIntosh wish they could be on a good day.

          Note: Please pronounce it mih-COW-un. Not mah-COON.

          1. re: Karl S

            "Ah, Macouns. What McIntosh wish they could be on a good day."

            LOL! Best line of the day. :-) And thank you for the pronunciation - I admit I was calling them mah-COONS.

        2. Did you see this thread a few days ago?

          http://www.chowhound.com/topics/show/...

          1. I love Honeycrisps! I've been known to start singing their praises to people with no provocation. But their season is woefully short. Get 'em while you can!

            1. Glad you guys are enjoying the Honeycrisps. We were trying to keep them a secret here in MN but they are so awesome that they had to get out sometime! LOL! My mom used to sell them when they were just a "numbered apple" (before they were named honeycrisp) from an apple shed at the U of M Landscape Arboretum. Because of their history, the closer you are to the twin cities, the better your odds of getting a honeycrisp in their short season. glad they are spreading to the coasts. try one they are seriously worth the usually high price!

              1. I enjoy the Honeycrisps. The University of Minnesota also has a newer apple called the Zestar! which has similar characteristics to the Honeycrisp. In late September, I was at the orchard where I usually get Honeycrisps, and they weren't selling them yet so I tried a Zestar!. Also a very good eating apple -- these were a hint more tart than Honeycrisps.

                I'm also noticing that some of the store bought Honeycrisps I've had this year have been lacking in flavor (mentioned by some in these threads) even though they're from Pepin Heights which seems to grow them by the billion. Those that are experiencing them for the first time may want to give them another chance next year or try and get them directly from an orchard. I wonder if the hot, dry summer up here had any effect.

                2 Replies
                1. re: MSPD

                  Usually, dry weather (unless extreme) acts to keep fruit small and tasty. Wet weather can bloat fruit and dilute flavor.

                  1. re: MSPD

                    our organic produce warehouse guys gave us some canadian honeycrisps that were GINOURMOUS and super tasty-- check for them-- you obviously live in my area-- they are CANADIAN certified organic and HUGE-- can't miss 'em.