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Tritan wine glasses?

Anybody tried these? Are they really much sturdier and less prone to clouding from automatic dishwashers?

http://www.pcfallon.com/Tritanstory.asp

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  1. No experience with them, but eagerly awaiting feedback. They were mentioned in this month's K&L Wines newsletter, at $8.99 each for the "Forte" line (must purchase case of 6).

    http://www.klwines.com/find/search.as...

    1 Reply
    1. re: SanJoseHound

      Yes - they are every bit as good as you may have read. Virtually unbreakable - we clanged two together forcefully to test that claim. They come out of the dishwasher in great shape. I bought two for a trial and after we used them for a while, we quickly bought about 6 more.

      We still use our Riedel glasses as part of the glass service for very nice dinners, but the Tritan is our default for during the week and less fancy events.

      We have had the Tritans for more than 1 year. I think ours are similar to, but not exactly the same as, the Tritan DIVA Cabernet/Merlot/Bordeaux series currently offered on the Wine Enthusiast site.
      http://www.wineenthusiast.com/E/resul...

    2. They may be dishwasher safe, but almost of them are too tall to fit in our dishwasher! Kind of defeats the purpose.

      7 Replies
      1. re: Robert Lauriston

        That's unfortunate. They fit really well in ours on the bottom rack at the back.

        1. re: kstroble

          After a dinner party the bottom rack's full of plates!

          The "Tritan Mondial All Purpose White Wine Glass" is only 7.3", I ordered a dozen ($8 a stem, $105 total with shiping) from:

          http://www.pcfallon.com

          1. re: Robert Lauriston

            I can't promise you that this is true, but we have been told by a couple of different disherwasher sales and repair people that we should NEVER use the lemon variety of dishwasher powder. They have said that the lemon is derived from a waxy substance that eventually causes problems with the dishwasher. So we generally use the most generic version of Cascade powder that we can buy. Whether that helps account for the lack of streaks and stains is another question entirely, which I can't answer. But I know we do not have streaking and staining problems.

            1. re: kstroble

              i've been told the same thing about avoiding lemon dishwasher detergents by people who should know.

            2. re: Robert Lauriston

              After a dinner party, we generally have to do at least three dishwasher loads! One of those is mostly glassware. But it sure beats handwashing 15 or 20 Reidel glasses. We generally give each guest three wine glasses - one Reidel, one Tritan and one Silver Oak(which is not nearly as nice a glass, but is also dishwasher safe). Then they can decide which wine should be tasted in which glass. During the week, we are all Tritan, all the time.

              1. re: Robert Lauriston

                Robert, how have your Tritan glasses been working out?

                1. re: kstroble

                  Fine so far. They're kind of small.

          2. We are exclusively using Schott Zweisel titanium crystal... unbreakeable, completely dishwasher safe... they aren't easy to find... we had to buy them from a Brittish website... spent about $700 on 12 sets of Bordeux, Burgundy & Water Glasses / Goblets (36 pieces all together).... not cheap relative to Riedel's but a lot cheapter, healthier & more attractive than classic leaded crystal.

            http://www.brentwoodwine.com/schott.html

            4 Replies
            1. re: Eat_Nopal

              The Zweisel Tritan lines have been getting a lot of press lately, and are much more available. Amazon has them, and Crystal Classics (crystalclassics.com) has an extensive selection. Speaking of selection, we have some of the Tritan "Selection" series on the way at $11 each.

              Now: how is "Tritan" pronounced?

              1. re: Steve K

                Holy Defecation! I guess it never pays to be an early adopter. Oh well... it was better than buying that leaded crystal crap from Macy's etc.,

                1. re: Eat_Nopal

                  Well, it depends. Some of the Tritan series are much more expensive. Check the Crystal Classics website to see how much it cost you to be said early adopter. And how many glasses didn't you break in the meantime? ;)

                2. re: Steve K

                  I bought my Zweisel Tritan's from IWA, which is owned by Dean and Deluca. A set of 6 of the goes for $60. I bought the whole series. I love them. I can't have fancy stemware because all my friends including myself are big klutzes. I don't put them in the dishwasher though. I like washing all my glasses by hand.

                  http://www.iwawine.com

              2. The Herbfarm, a famous Seattle area restaurant uses Titanium in their restaurant. When we ate there I found the glasses very thin rimmed and lovely. We were served a 9-course meal with 6 different wines, each in a different glass and every wine glass was wonderful. I'm not sure of the european company that supplies The Herbfarm but they do sell them at relatively good prices through The Herbfarm website:

                http://www.theherbfarm.com/Shop-ProdC...

                1. We've had six of the Forte since April, and have already managed to break one by dropping it on a padded vinyl floor. I was disappointed, but they are beautiful, and certainly sturdier than the average crystal.

                  1. We just purchased 1/2 dozen from K&L as a gift for my in-laws and if looks count for anything, they are beautiful. My husband and I seriously considered keeping them for ourselves as they are that nice. I see the SF Chronicle's wine section has these as a recommended gift item in today's edition so I would imagine that they will get quite the demand.

                    1. I just ordered some of these for my parents for a Christmas gift. They don't use crystal wine glasses because they want something that can handle the "wear and tear" of the dishwasher without constant breakage, yet they always admire the the thin rims and feel of my Spiegelaus when they come over. I figure even if they don't hold up for years, my folks will get to drink from nice glasses on a daily basis, and the price is right. The best mail-order price I found is from the Wine Club, at $39.95 for a set of 6.

                      http://www.thewineclub.com/results?id...

                      1. Still haven't broken any after a year of heavy use. No discoloration from the dishwasher, either.

                        2 Replies
                        1. re: Robert Lauriston

                          I've managed to break a couple, one unsurprisingly because I ran into the kitchen faucet but another rather inexplicably just by rubbing my fingers along the rim to clean.

                          1. re: Robert Lauriston

                            You mentioned previously that the ones you bought were a bit small; have you gotten over that aspect? Would you have bought the larger ones but for the dishwasher size issue?

                          2. Okay, I've read all of the responses and will share what I've learned. My first "full" set of wine glasses (save for the four hand cut, but somewhat non-uniform lead crystal glasses from Czechoslovakia which I purchased freshman year in college) was Schott Zweisel. Moving from Chicago to St. Louis, I soon noticed my lead crystal stemware becoming cloudly. (The Frididaire repairman attributed it to hot water; I lowered the temperature of my water with no effect; occasionally, I washed the glasses in CLR, etc.) And they became even more crazed in Atlanta. After a couple of decades (and a high ROI), I started to research for replacements. I finally found Zwiesel's website and learned all about Tritan. Then the challenge was to see the glasses in person. I found a couple glasses in Weston, Florida. The Enoteca was really elegant, but I just didn't have shelves with enough height for them. Then I learned that William Glenn in Sacramento was one of the largest dealers in northern California; and I was working in Sacramento. One of my concerns was their height - and their volume. I really hate pouring a half a bottle into a single glass. So, I picked the shortest that I could find - Forte. Even so, I had to reconfigure my cabinet shelves to accommodate their height. (Fortunately, I could.) Then there was the question of the dishwasher. After all, what's the use of dishwasher resistant glasses if they don't fit into the dishwasher (as so aptly noted in a prior response)? Fortunately, I was able to reconfigure the height of the upper tray. (Thank you, Miele - even if I had to forfeit my first born progeny to buy it.)

                            So, my conclusions and recommendations:
                            1. Buy Schott Zweisel Tritan; it's great. It's break resistant and dishwasher resistant.
                            2. Find a dishwasher with an adjustable height tray - maybe Asko, Bosch, or LG has one, but I do love my Miele dishwasher (and vacuum cleaner, oven, hood, washing machine, and dryer).
                            3. Regardless of what stemware you use, find a LOW phosphate detergent. It's the phosphate which causes the crazing. Ignore the recommendation of the dishwasher manufacturer; I'll bet that there's some ulterior reason for the recommendation,. I use Ecover (this is an unpaid endorsement) that I buy at Whole Foods. It has no phosphate. It's easy on your glasses and great for the environment, and my dishes and glassware come out clean.

                            1 Reply
                            1. re: addominek

                              <<Regardless of what stemware you use, find a LOW phosphate detergent. It's the phosphate which causes the crazing>>

                              fwiw, the Kirkland (Costco) house brand of liquid dishwasher detergent contains no phosphates.

                            2. Still haven't broken any. Still no ill effects from the dishwasher (I just use whatever powder Costco sells).

                              I would have bought slightly larger ones if they'd been available but I've gotten used to the smaller size. We often have two or three bottles open for comparison or whatever so a smaller pour is probably a good thing.

                              4 Replies
                              1. re: Robert Lauriston

                                I've had 18 of these over the past three years with 10 left. All are Tritan Divas, all bordeaux which is a very large glass. They're not unbreakable-that's a myth. BUT there are MUCH more difficult to break than any Reidel glass (I've used Vinum, Vinum Extreme (somewhat similar to the Tritan Divas in durability but much more expensive; my Vinum extremes have lasted almost as long) and Sommeliers which are absurdly easy to break). I wash the Divas in my dishwasher but I use a plastic frame which I hang them from. Overall, I love these glasses which is why I've had so many-I buy more when several break.

                                I've seen these advertised for almost $90 and I've seen them sell for $39.95 on a Wine Enthusiast sale. I've also brought back a six pack from Stuttgart on an airplane which lead to my buying the rest. No, they are not a Sommelier, but they are a great every day glass and if you buy a larger glass and drink red, they will do justice to most wines. Don't hesitate to buy a glass that looks like a fishbowl. Especially if you like to swirl.

                                1. re: Joe H

                                  For anyone reading this who lives in the Washington, D. C. area Fortessa is the North American importer and wholesaler for Schott Zweisel. They have an outlet store in Sterling, VA. It is approximately $50 for six Tritan Diva bordeaux glasses. They'll also have discontinued closeouts of Schott Zweisel for $5 or 6 a glass. Additionally, Zweisel hand blown crystal is available at remarkable prices. A $350 decanter was going for about a third of this a couple of weeks ago.

                                2. re: Robert Lauriston

                                  I have had 56 of the Top Ten line of wine glasses for the last two years and have had only three broken glasses (all in the dishwasher when someone wedged a glass in a manner that made breakage inevitable). That said, I bought a set of the all purpose water goblets this year to use with Belgian beer -- four of the six glasses have broken. I don't know if there is a structural explanation, or if beer drinkers are just more clumsy....

                                  1. re: Robert Lauriston

                                    Update: we finally broke one of my original 12 last month, "in the dishwasher when someone wedged a glass in a manner that made breakage inevitable."

                                    Based on that very positive experience I just bought six "Forte" Champagne flutes ($9 each from klwines.com).

                                    http://blogs.sfweekly.com/foodie/laur...

                                  2. It's been a bad year for my Tritan glasses. We broke three more since January, so I'm down to eight of my original dozen purchased three years ago. The stupid tile floor in the kitchen's the culprit, in the dining room they just bounce off the wood floor and I imagine vinyl would be the same.

                                    5 Replies
                                    1. re: Robert Lauriston

                                      I bought six more "Tritan Mondial All Purpose White," and currently have ten, so I guess we must have broken an average of one a year. That's definitely sufficiently less breakage to make them cost-effective.

                                      Haven't broken any flutes.

                                      A friend complained that the glasses were cloudy, so I spent a few minutes polishing them, and it all came off. I think the Trader Joe's dishwasher detergent we're currently using doesn't have that problem.

                                      1. re: Robert Lauriston

                                        It's strange, but all of of my flutes are gone, but I still have all 12 of my pinot-style and probably 10 of my 12 sb-style whites more than five years later. Again, I suppose it might have something to do with the typical user of the glass than the glass itself. Still recommending the Tritan all the time.

                                        1. re: Robert Lauriston

                                          I have 27 of them, fairly evenly distributed between all purpose white, bordeaux, and burgundy glasses. The only ones I broke were three that shattered when a cast iron griddle fell over on them.

                                          1. re: dinwiddie

                                            Darn, I just got a text from my wife. She and her friends broke one last night. I didn't ask how, but it is rare enough that she said something about doing it.

                                          2. re: Robert Lauriston

                                            I used about 200 Fortes daily in my restaurant for four years. Commercial dishwasher using Health Dept mandated chemicals. All hand polished (against HD rules ;)).

                                            Broke nine in four years. One by customer and not sure how she did it. Lost five to the concrete floor and three to a ham handed polisher who snapped the stems.

                                            Been using four dozen of them at home for the four years since closing the restaurant. All still look like new except for one that collided with the rock floor.

                                        2. Robert,

                                          I have a set of Tritan Bdx. stems, and travel with 3, plus use 3 for my everyday wine glasses. No issues with any, and they DO seem to last longer.

                                          My "cleaning ladies" seemed to do damage to my Riedel Vinum glasses, if I did not hide them, but have yet to destroy the Tritans (though I do try to hide them, before their arrival).

                                          As for clouding, they do seem to be better, but then I hand wash them.

                                          Soon, we will have two Miele Diamond dishwashers, that have Riedel inserts, and will try the Tritans first, to see how they do.

                                          Hunt

                                          [Edit] Oops, seems that this is a zombie thread, so you probably know all that I wrote.

                                          3 Replies
                                          1. re: Bill Hunt

                                            Interesting coincidence . . . I, too, will soon have two Miele Diamond dishwashers with the Riedel inserts . . . .

                                            1. re: Bill Hunt

                                              As I said above, I've been washing my Tritans for seven years, in a basic cheap regular dishwasher. There's no clouding or any other sign that they're not brand-new.

                                              1. re: Robert Lauriston

                                                I really like my forte full red wine glasses I got at sur la table. 21 oz. and good for both red & whites.