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Excellent Butternut Squash Soup

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FelafelBoy Oct 5, 2006 05:36 AM

Two brands come to mind - Imagine's "Organic Creamy Butternut Squash Soup" which contains everything organic, and has somewhat of a sweet taste perhaps from the rice syrup, and ... Campbell's Select Gold Label Golden Butternut Squash soup.

The Select version is, to my taste, the best of the bunch. The soup is so thick in the aseptic box that it requires you to scoop it out - it's like a thick puree rather than a thinner liquid which is what most soups (including Imagine's version) are.

I add fresh vegetables, such as mushrooms and chopped up squash, to the Select soup. While it does not contain the same degree of healthy ingredients as the Imagine version, their soup tastes like a gourmet version you would have had a better restaurant. While most companies try to jazz up their cans of soup with pasta or various combinations of vegetables, the Campbell's Select line is, in fact, a premium line, and tastes much richer than almost all the other soups. With the butternut squash soup, you can be creative and add a large combination and variety of vegetables to jazz up the soup, such as diced carrots, a leaf or two of spinach - my favorite two additions include yellow squash and sliced mushrooms.

  1. jonnybee Oct 5, 2006 05:44 AM

    I love the Campbell's variety. Some things I like to add to it: brown sugar, cinnamon, cumin, cayenne, tumeric. I dont add all of those ingredients but usually at least one or two depending on mood. It seems to be a soup that lends itself well to being jazzed up.

    1. f
      FelafelBoy Oct 5, 2006 06:09 AM

      johnnybee - Yes! Those are also good additions. As you mentioned, adding cumin, tumeric, and other spices can jazz up canned/boxed soups that have had their taste toned down. It's amazing how easy it is to create more flavor by using the canned/boxed soup as the base/stock, and then adding your fresh ingredients.

      I do like the combination of ingredients Campbells has used in this squash soup and I find that the soup doesn't need much extra additional help, but as you said, there are some spices that can make it taste even better. I guess adding brown sugar is fine if you need more of a sweet kick. I talked myself into believing that there was enough sweetness coming from the squash and potato mixture. It's interesting to read the label and learn of all the vegetables used to create the puree/soup. No wonder why it is so full of flavor.

      Unless one has tasted the Select version of soup, he cannot imagine the difference between it and the more liquid versions with the same name.

      1. b
        biscuitdaddy Oct 6, 2006 01:28 AM

        It's a cinch to make on your own. Only downside: peeling them can be a little frustrating. Here's a recipe I've had lots of delicious success with. The roasted red pepper puree -- also very easy with canned peppers in the food processor -- makes a terrific addition:
        http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/rec...

        9 Replies
        1. re: biscuitdaddy
          Chocolatechipkt Oct 6, 2006 01:39 AM

          I was going to say the same thing. I like adding apples and carrots, too.

          1. re: biscuitdaddy
            m
            ML8000 Oct 6, 2006 02:52 AM

            The hassle of peeling can be eliminated by cutting in half and baking for about 30-45 minutes. The rine pretty much can be pulled off.

            1. re: ML8000
              Snackish Oct 7, 2006 12:33 AM

              Yes, that is what I do. I use a big cleaver to...well, cleave it, then take out the strings and seeds and bake.

              Here's my foolproof recipe: at the same time you put the squash in the oven, put in a whole, unpeeled onion and a whole head of garlic. When everything is nice and soft and baked, puree the flesh of the squash with the onion flesh and the squished-out cloves of baked garlic. You can use whatever liquid you like - stock, milk, half and half, just enough to make a thick puree. Then put back in the pan to reheat with more liquid to thin a bit. Salt, pepper.

              It is super yum.

              1. re: Snackish
                m
                ML8000 Oct 7, 2006 12:40 AM

                Try lime wedges for juice to put on right before eating. Sounds like a weird combo but it totally works.

                1. re: Snackish
                  p
                  pitterpatter Oct 7, 2006 02:05 PM

                  That sounds like mine, except I add chopped, fresh sage (a culinary marriage from heaven) and often garnish it with a swirl of fresh goat cheese.

                  1. re: pitterpatter
                    Chester Eleganté Oct 12, 2006 04:49 PM

                    Good call. I also used to fry up onions, sage, and pancetta as the base for this.

                  2. re: Snackish
                    c
                    cyndriee Oct 23, 2006 10:57 PM

                    Your recipe sounds good... do you add a potato also like the Campbell's version has or any other spices besides the salt and pepper? Thanks....

                2. re: biscuitdaddy
                  c
                  cyndriee Oct 23, 2006 10:53 PM

                  Hi... tried finding your recipe at the link given but it said the page was not available. Would love to try it because I do love the Campbell's version. Nothing better on a cold day with some crusty bread to dip into and enjoy. Thanks....

                  1. re: biscuitdaddy
                    lemonfaire Oct 25, 2006 06:25 AM

                    I made some soup last week with pre-peeled butternut squash cubes from Trader Joe's. They're probably not as good as the real thing, but wow, did using them cut down on prep time!

                  2. Melanie Wong Oct 12, 2006 12:24 AM

                    Grocery Outlet store in Marina, Calif. has the Hain Imagine Organic Creamy Butternut Squash Soup and the Creamy Sweet Corn on close-out at 2 for $1 (reg. $3.49 each) for the 32 ounce size. Labelled with Nov. 06 expiration date.

                    1. yayadave Oct 24, 2006 01:53 AM

                      I used this recipe for pressure cooker bisque. I split (cleavered) the squash and seeded it but did not peel it. What a pain that is. Then I chopped (cleavered) it into chunks. Same with the apples. I used 2t of apple pie spices. When it was done cooking, I put it through the food mill before the blender. It was a pretty good effort.

                      http://www.fagoramerica.com/fagor/But...

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