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boeuf (non)bourguignon

j
jasmurph Sep 27, 2006 02:27 PM

So, as the temperature drops here, I've got a hankering to make boeuf bourguignon, but I'm always unsure on the wine to use. Well, duh, Brugundy--but much as the dish tastes great, I hate to see the bottle go into a pot rather than my glass, at least at the price most Burgundy goes for. So, I'm looking to spend in the $10-20 range. Can you recommend a Burgundy in that range? A Pinot Noir from somewhere else--wouldn't CA ones be too bright and fruity? Or would some other varietal work just as well? (sacre bleu!) better?

  1. s
    Sam B Sep 27, 2006 02:40 PM

    I'd look for Bourgogne Rouge from the 2003 vintage - it was a particularly warm year, so while many wines were overipe, wines from the lesser appellations achieved levels of quality unusual for "little" wines. Or, consider the Cotes Chalonais - Marsannay for instance. Most of these wines will set you back less than $20

    1. carswell Sep 27, 2006 02:52 PM

      Extrapolating from Quebec prices, you should be able to find decent generic Burgundies for between US$10 and $15. And many 2003s have a richness that would make them good candidates for a stew. Two I can recco are Rodet's and Doudet-Naudin's.

      That said, my fall-back for cooking this type of dish is Borsao from Campo de Borja in northeastern Spain. Mostly grenache with a dash of cabernet sauvignon and tempranillo but vinified in a lightly fruity, high-acid style that gives it a bit of Burgundian allure. I'd be surprised if a bottle ran you more than $7 or $8.

      1. Robert Lauriston Sep 27, 2006 04:10 PM

        I usually use an inexpensive (around $8) Cotes du Rhone. Much better flavor and structure than any Burgundy or other pinot noir in that price range.

        1 Reply
        1. re: Robert Lauriston
          g
          GeoffD Oct 7, 2006 03:53 AM

          "I usually use an inexpensive (around $8) Cotes du Rhone. Much better flavor and structure than any Burgundy or other pinot noir in that price range"

          +1

          Vieille Ferme or Perrin Reserve are what I typically use.

        2. Chinon00 Sep 28, 2006 03:00 AM

          Anything red in a Burgundian bottle (bottle with "hips" and not "shoulders") i.e. Syrah, Mourvedre, Cote du Rhone, Beaujolais (Village or better), Languedoc, Lirac, etc.

          1. c
            Chris Weber Oct 7, 2006 01:45 AM

            I also vote for Cote du Rhone, or some Iberian wines, traditional Portuguese wines included. Not anything too ripe, that's not Burgundian.

            You want medium weight, not too ripe, with some fruit, not woody. The whole berry fermentation style of Cotes du Rhone works well.

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