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Looking for these brands of olive oil: Capezzana, Castella d'Ana, and

Lila Jagr. I'd appreciate suggestions about where to obtain them.

Thanks.

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  1. Zingermann's gets the Cappezzana new oil in January; a few years ago, I pre-ordered and they shipped it to me. I have seen it on shelves around town but always a year old. Make sure you check the dates on the bottle when you buy Tuscan oil of this quality. You can also get new oil (not Tuscan) around Christmas from DiPalo..they bring it in themselves and it is excellent; last year the price was $17.00 for the 500ml. Personally I would buy the Fairwy bottled oils...tthey are often much fresher than the big names you mentioned.

    1. Thanks for the feedback. Can you recommend a specific Fairway oil to purchase? Which producers does DiPalo import?

      1 Reply
      1. re: Benjamin68

        DiPalo brings in new oil from Sicily under their own label; it is from the Trapani area. they stock may other oils but I do not think they carry those famous name ones you mentioned. On my trips to Italy, when shopping for oil I have been told that names such as Laudemio, Castello d. Ama, etc are mainly for export and that Italians know that there are equally good oils without those famous names on the labels. I think that the thinking at DiPalo is the same. I am sure you could find the "name" oils at places like Dean and DeLuca and Grace's among other places. Again, you have to be very careful of the dates.

        Fairway sells about a dozen oils under their own label. The selection changes. Right now I am using a Gato de Hurdes (sp?) from Extremadura that is just great!!! I have used their Spanish Arbequina oil and the Baena in the past For finishing I have in my kitchen now a terrific Fairway A.O.C. Vallee de Baux de Provence. From Italy I think they usually carry an Umbrian and a Sicilian and perhaps a Tuscan oil; they also have excellent Australian and Californian oils and you can try them before you buy which is just great. Again I will stress that I think the age of the oil is as important a factor in its quality than the name on the label. I first tried Cappezzana at Cibreo in Florence and was so overwhelmed that I searched for it at home. When I finally found it on the shelf of a place like Balducci (I think) it was way over the hill; that is why I ordered form Zingermanns. I have since realized that there is no ned to go to the trouble and expense of seeking out the name oils...at least that is my opinion. Best of all is to bring some new oil back from Europe in the fall.

      2. "Castella d'Ana"

        Do you mean Castello di Ama?

        1. Erica,

          Thanks for the detailed feedback. I will head over to Fairway.

          1 Reply
          1. re: Benjamin68

            Let us know what you buy and what you think, Ben...

          2. The funny thing is, it sounds like I'm some kind of olive oil status whore, but in fact I saw the aforementioned oils recommended in a Page and Dornenburg book and figured I'd try and find the. I think Piero Selvaggio and Mario Batali recommended them. It sounds like everyone is saying, "You can get similar quality without the fancy names," so I might not bother, or maybe just request them as gifts.

            1 Reply
            1. re: Benjamin68

              I thought the same way a few years back. I saw Batali cook with Laudemio oil, and looked all over for it in Rome one year. No luck. The Roamsn actually sneered at Tuscan oil but that is another story. Then on a trip to Tuscany, I looked again, which is when I was told by several food people that the locals do not use these "name" brands..that they are sold to Americans!! And when I did see Laudemio here in NY, sure enough the bottle was a year old.

              Just to make a small correction: I looked at the bottle of new oil rom DiPalo and while it has their sticker on it, the maker in Fontanasalsa near Trapani, Sicily.