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Best sushi in the Bay Area - price no object

  • Husky Sep 11, 2006 11:40 PM
  • 9

I'm looking for the best sushi in the Bay Area. By best I mean most authentic and freshest. Price is no object. I'm trying to see if I can save myself a trip to NY or LA. Amazingly, and I think I caught them on their best day ever, but the most outstanding sushi I've had in this area was at a lunch at Chaya (I know...unexpected).

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  1. Best Ankimo IMHO is at Ino, although I don't know if their other sushi's can be considered the best in the bay area, but Ino ranks up there with the best.

    1. Sakae Sushi in Burlingame gets my vote.

      1. It depends on what kind of sushi you like - dynamic, huge pieces of toro or subtle, sweet pieces of hirame. I am not a big fan of the former, so I can't help you there, but with Anzu in flux, I'd put my vote on Ino for the latter style. I have yet to try Kaygestu though - although they are not really a sushi-house, I hear their fish is supreme.

        1. i've heard many times about a joint called Sawa Sushi in Sunnyvale, still a round? any good?

          this joint litereally charged customers a few hundred dollars per person.

          1. I've been there. It's one of the "giant pieces of big fat toro"-type places.

            1. Here's my thought's on the matter with respect to LA and NYC:

              http://www.chowhound.com/topics/show/...

              1. Ino Sushi is probably the only traditional sushi-ya I know of in the Bay Area that serves nigiri directly on the counter, just like some old school places in Japan. Definitely worth a visit (or more), though this place has its strengths and weaknesses. Depends on what one defines as important to the overall sushi experience.

                Kaygetsu in Menlo Park is indeed supreme and would surpass Ino, could potentially be a good Anzu stand-in with regards to the craftsmanship, delicacy, presentation, and knifework if they had more varieties for sushi neta, but as they specialize in kaiseki dinners it is natural for the sushi bar to be more in the background and diminished. Basically Sakae like top quality fish with even more mature and refined (and fast) knife skills as well as perfectly molded nigiri that's not a McSushi supersize like some other places, from the taisho of the South Bay/Peninsula Toshi-san (who basically Mr Sawa learned from and worked with before years ago...so that tells a lot).

                My review of Kaygetsu's sushi from a early summer visit:

                http://www.chowhound.com/topics/show/...

                Not cheap, but much cheaper than the guy Toshi-san used to work with...

                Porthos, have you been back to Kaygetsu recently and (hopefully) caught them on a day where they had more behind the counter stashes / imports? ;-

                )

                Kitsho in Cupertino is another mighty fine restaurant, though sushi rice is very weak in sushi vinegar marination but sublime fish and quite a lot of interesting rare offerings from Japan and around the world on random visits, such as recently Hokkaido uni from the shell sashimi, klom mutsu(?) of the tai family that tastes like kinmedai (alfonsino). One of very few places that does kelp marination of hirame (hirame no konbu jime), though not often. Ahh well, nothing's perfect :-)

                1 Reply
                1. re: K K

                  Sorry, I haven't done sushi in a while. I'm hooked on Back-A-Yard. I'm over 10 visits now. I'm saving up for my upcoming reservations to FL and Oliveto's Truffle Tasting. After I recover from those two financial whippings, I hope to go back to Anzu on a Tuesday/Wednesday night...before he retires.

                  Then it's back to NYC for Yasuda-san and then Rome for gelato and that old grandmother near Campo di Fiore who serves you an amazing 5 course meal with wine for 19 euros (hope she's still there) then Florence for bolito misto! My meager salary is being stretched thin...

                2. If you can look past the "hip" interior, I find Tokyo Go Go to be the most consistently great, fresh and tasty sushi in the Bay Area. Also, a close second is Ibisu in the Sunset. It's more traditional, but very fresh and yummy.