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Anyone have a home made Mochi recipe?

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Hi everyone! I'm looking for a recipe/method for making mochi, not an filled but plain mochi cakes to dip in sugared kinako. My grandparents and great grandparents used to have a complicated machine/grinder that they used...all the ladies would form patties from the hot sticky rice and lay them out on a floured board to cool. This was all done right before the new year. I've heard it can be done much easier in the microwave. Has anyone tried this? Recipes I've found online include things like vanilla or butter. I don't ever recall the women using either of those. Anyone tried this?

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  1. I'm not sure a microwave is going to make it much easier, because if you're not using a mochi machine, you've still got to mash the rice into a paste. The traditional way, of course, is to use a big mallet and a huge wooden bowl (carved out of the end of a log, IIRC). You dump the steaming rice into the log end and pound away. Bachan used to talk about several men doing this in sequence, each with his own mallet, with the group surrounding the log, poundin, chanting, laughing, and guzzling sake.

    That's probably not the method you want, tho. You're probably better off buying a machine.

    1 Reply
    1. re: ricepad

      You brought back memories, ricepad. I can remember my Jichan doing this with a group of me...sort of a ceremonious type thing for one batch only. The rest they ran through the machine! Those were the days. Jichan is long gone but that memory remains!

    2. The kind of mochi I make in the microwave or steam is using mochiko flour-sweet for manju making-azuki beans inside or layered chi-chi dango.
      The type of mochi that I think you are referring to is made from mochigome steamed in a "seiro" and pounded with a "kine" in a "usu" before New Year's at a "mochi tsuki"
      During the summer I help with a cultural camp and we were fortunate to have a mochitsuki.The big kids started the pound and the little ones had a chance to pound with their mini-kine. Wonderful to have fresh, warm, mochi formed by little hands.
      http://i12.photobucket.com/albums/a23...
      http://i12.photobucket.com/albums/a23...
      http://i12.photobucket.com/albums/a23...
      http://i12.photobucket.com/albums/a23...
      http://i12.photobucket.com/albums/a23...

      2 Replies
      1. re: mochi mochi

        Thanks mochi mochi! I remember these events. I couldn't get over the old generation ladies and how they'd form the patties straight from the hot steaming batch. I remember trying to do it with them and saying "ouch ouch ouch!" Of course they all laughed. I was only 18 at the time! Heartwarming pictures!

        1. re: mrsmegawatt

          Those gentle but time-weathered hands... I remember too. Those kids were a-dor-able!

      2. I believe Panasonic makes a mochi machine whereby you can make a small amount at a time.

        1. The microwave version is not that bad, but it does get hard very fast so plan on eating the whole batch that same day.

          1 cup mochiko sweet rice flour (glutinous rice flour)
          1 cup water
          1/4 cup sugar (optional)

          katakuriko or corn starch for dusting.

          1. Mix mochiko and sugar in a bowl.
          2. Add cold water and mix thoroughly. (will be watery).
          3. Put in a microwaveable dish. Cover with plastic wrap.
          4. Microwave on high for 4 -10 minutes (depending on the power of your microwave). Take off plastic wrap. Cool for a few minutes. Cut. Serve with kinako and sugar.

          2 Replies
          1. re: theSauce

            Are these okay if you cut and then freeze what you don't use?

            1. re: mrsmegawatt

              When we make mochi at church, they always freeze the leftovrs.

          2. The Panasonic machine runs about $250.

            Check out this website on mochitsuki. http://kcc.fc2web.com/rcp/mochitsuki.htm

            1 Reply
            1. re: arakawabunga

              At New Year's there are special batches traditionally made by rikishi (sumo wrestlers). Because they are so large and strong, they are supposed to be able to pound the rice paste extra smooth.