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Funky brunch

I have lived in a lot of other cities where you can get really great brunch for very reasonable prices (i.e. The Kitchenette in NYC, Thumbs Up and the Flying Biscuit in Atlanta) served in a funky, hip atmosphere. Does these places exist in Boston? If so, please enlighten me?!
Thanks!

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  1. The usual suspects here include Centre St Cafe in JP (long lines if you don't get there ahead of time...) and Tremont 647 in the South End. But generally, Boston doesn't strain to do what might conventionally be considered hip or funky that often.

    1. I think Blue Room in Cambridge does an interesting brunch. I like the unique dishes; the way it's lined up along the kitchen itself (except if you're sitting at one the the tables where everyone snakes around you waiting in line.) Admittedly, I don't go out for brunch all that often, but I think this one is quite good.

      1. I agree with the Blue Room rec. The food is good with an interesting variety of dishess which are replenished frequently. I also agree with the other commment about "funky in Boston" The Blue Room is about as funky as you are going to get in this city

        1. Besides Centre St. and Tremont, I think East Coast and their bloody mary bar could be considered funky. Maybe the Neighborhood in Somerville and their breakfasts. As far as a deal goes, Paparazzi on Dartmouth St. includes a mimosa or bellini (as do many places in NYC) for a good price but not funky. Funky brunch is definitely not a big Boston thing.

          2 Replies
          1. re: Joanie

            Joanie: What are Tremont and East Coast? Can you give me more of a name?

            1. re: jandazza

              Tremont 647 in the south end and East Coast Grill in Inman Sq.

          2. I love the Blue Room for brunch but would not consider it funky in the least, nor the Neighborhood. And I don't consider jazz brunches (of which there are a few around) funky as a category.

            I should offer my speculation about the lack of funkiness here: it's a combination of our city's longtime anti-glamor culture (that is, glamor is not only rare here but is normally considered a negative) and that abundance of students, to whom the province of funkiness is ceded.