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In need of a somewhat healthy New Orleans-type recipe??

w
wineaux Aug 14, 2006 09:48 PM

Going to an outdoor music performance this weekend with cajun/zydeco music and our group is bringing New Orleans type food to munch on. Having never been to New Orleans, I started looking for some good recipes and they all seem to be in the artery-clogging category!! Any suggestions for some good cajun-style recipe that could be considered healthy???

  1. w
    wineaux Aug 17, 2006 12:14 PM

    Thanks for all the great suggestions... I'll pass them along to the rest of the group and hope we can put them all to use!

    1 Reply
    1. re: wineaux
      h
      Hungry Celeste Aug 17, 2006 01:50 PM

      While jambalaya is certainly a good idea, here are some additional suggestions in a more New Orleanian trend rather than a cajun one:
      --shrimp remoulade; small peeled boiled shrimp served on lettuce topped with a great homemade remoulade sauce (red or white, whichever version you prefer)
      --crabmeat ravigote; chilled crabmeat with a mayo-based dressing, lots of recipes on the web
      --marinated crab claws; buy cooked, cleaned blue crab claws (sometimes called "cocktail clawfingers") and marinate in a tangy vinagrette...feel free to add small whole mushrooms or cracked olives or any of the usual stuff you'd put into a marinated salad. Fun to eat with your fingers and good cold, too.

    2. geg5150 Aug 14, 2006 11:05 PM

      I'm from Louisiana and can't believe I'm suggesting this!! You can certainly do red beans and rice with turkey sausage in the beans. Other than that, there's no oil/fat in the beans, but the turkey will still impart the smokey/meaty flavor. Brown rice and a salad on the side and you're good to go!

      Enjoy!

      1. n
        niki rothman Aug 14, 2006 10:54 PM

        I've never heard of a dry roux before - what a great idea. I make a gumbo type thingee that is very healthy and delicious. You can use smoked turkey for the meat. The day before braise smoked turkey parts in water about halfway up the height of the meat in a dutch oven - simmer for about an hour 1/2. Refrigerate overnight. Next day pick off the meat and remove the fat from the liquid. reserve the meat. In the liquid, cook a lot of minced oinion, red & green bell pep., sliced celery, some whole garlic (less sharp if not chopped) - for a half hour. Last 15 minutes add a little thyme & oregano, 3 bay leaves, 2 pinches of dry red pep flakes, and Better than Bullion chicken base or salt to taste. Add your dry roux to thicken. Add the chopped turkey meat. Serve over rice.

        1. Junie D Aug 14, 2006 10:40 PM

          A lifetime ago I was a cardiac rehabilitation dietitian in Baton Rouge. I used to teach people how to make a version of roux by heating only flour in a dry skillet or in the oven, stirring frequently and watching carefully, until it was well-browned. Then add just a little fat and your flavorful broth and end up with similar flavor to a traditional roux for your gumbo or etouffee.

          1 Reply
          1. re: Junie D
            s
            Spencer Aug 14, 2006 10:46 PM

            That's exactly what I was going to suggest. A friend, a health conscious physician who is a nola native, made a gumbo with a dry roux for me and it was of the best I've had. She emphasized the "watching carefully" as well.
            SPencer

          2. Marge Aug 14, 2006 10:07 PM

            I have made this lightened up version of jambalaya. To even further lighten it, I used chicken andouille sausage and brown rice (need to cook it a little longer if you use brown rice).

            http://food.cookinglight.com/cooking/...

            1. frankiii Aug 14, 2006 10:01 PM

              Well, Cajun and New Orleans are really two different things. Not to be pedantic, just making a point of cultural pride. But, if you are cooking for a group i would do a chicken and sausage jambalaya. the ingredient should be widely available and it is pretty easy to make.

              I have not made this one but Emeril has a reliable feel for this sort of cooking:

              http://www.foodnetwork.com/food/recip...

              not SUPER healthy or anything but not horrible for you either

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