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Wine list recommendations

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There's a half-off special on French and Italian wines from this list tonight:

http://bacarsf.com/images/wine/winebt...

Definitely some great values. Any suggestions?

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  1. I would explore the red Burgundies personally. 2001 was regarded as an average vintage, but I've had a few lately and I think they are just early-maturing and drinking beautifully right now. Lots of earth and smoke, which I like in older pinots. I can't recommend a specific bottle on this list, though most of them are from very well respected producers.

    -nick

    1. vilmart creation brut 96
      didier dagueneau pouilly fume--anything from 04
      dr loosen auslese urz-wurz 1990 (one of the great vintages ever in riesling, from a kickass producer
      balbas ribera del duero G.R. 96
      andrew will sorella 01 (or champoux--they're both awesome)
      cigliuti barbaresco "seraboella" 97--that is a rock star of a wine

      where is this restaurant? quite the list...

      1 Reply
      1. re: HeelsSoxHound

        As you might guess from the name, Bacar's a very wine-centric restaurant.

        Only French and Italian bottles are part of the sale.

      2. whoops--just saw that... well, some of my picks still apply, then--and i think that that barbaresco and the champagne are the stars of what i chose anyway (although that might be my own palate speaking) and dagueneau's stuff is fantastic summertime food wine. that hippy bastard has a magic touch with the sauv blanc, i tell you...

        1. Start with Dom. Romanee-Conti 2002.
          Then somewhere in the middle, go for the Mouton 1966 (I've had the '95 and it has the makings of another great Pauillac, but it's too young at this point).

          The Italians, specifically the ones from Piedmont, are too young to drink. Although, I'd be tempted to try the Gaja's from Langhe - but that would probably be just a waste of money as these wines are really best when mature.

          One thing about this restaurant that I've noticed over the years is that their list lacks mature vintages in any region.

          1 Reply
          1. re: RCC

            Yeah, the Mouton '66 is something of a bargain, if they don't exclude it from the sale. The DRCs I'm sure they will, not that they're in my budget even half-off.

          2. yeah, i didn't include the four-digit burgundies and bordeaux, because to twist an old maxim, if you've got to wait for half off, you probably can't afford it anyway. i know i can't. the only drc experience i've had (which i'll remember for the rest of my life) was at the hands of a college buddy of mine who is well off, but uneducated wine-wise. at my going away party when i moved he gave me the list and said anything you want. "anything?" yup... boy oh boy was that awesome. anywho--sorry for the brief rant-- i just needed to explain why i shyed away from the super soignee stuff. hope your dinner was good!
            also, i wouldn't exactly call drc 02 mature... in fact, it's probably nearly undrinkable without having called ahead to have them decant it THAT MORNING for a 9:30 reservation. that's plain infanticide.

            1 Reply
            1. re: HeelsSoxHound

              I didn't think the DRC is mature in any way. I just figured that compared to the other whites, and if the OP was splurging, this is what would make a good white starter.

              Also, I can't assume that the OP will not splurge especially at half off with the post. Also a quick glance at the prices, half-off on the Mouton, which is at 3-digit prices, is really just probably at retail price.

            2. I suggested the Mouton but did not get a second.

              We had the 2002 Peter Dipoli sauvignon "Voglar" ($28), 2004 Eric Louis Sancerre ($18), 1996 Gruaud Larose ($62.50), and 2004 Dagueneau Juran├žon ($95 500ml).

              First three were great values, particularly the Eric Louis. The Dagueneau was too expensive even at half off, but was interesting to try--not surprisingly the style was more like a late-harvest Loire than a traditional Juran├žon.