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Cleaning gas grill

mrsmegawatt Aug 10, 2006 04:35 AM

I saw an ad on tv for Pam where this guy was spraying the rack on his gas grill. It was as silver and clean as can be. I grilled some wonderful flank steak today and realized that mine was charred black. I usually heat up the grill and then when it's hot, I use a wire brush to "scrape" the rack before I put on the meat. Does anyone have a shiny clean rack on their grill? I mean, it made me wonder...do I have to grodiest grill on the planet? Everything tastes great!

  1. ted Aug 10, 2006 12:43 PM

    I think the key thing you said is "I saw and ad on tv..."

    No real grill that's ever been used is going to be that clean. If you have cast iron grates, they'll develop a patina just like a cast iron skillet. Our gas grill has stainless grates, and they're pretty black, too. If you're scraping the big stuff off, you're doing good in my book. A lot of folks say to wipe a little oil on the grate right before you put on the food- Raichlen does it often on his show, BBQ U. Most of the time, that's too fussy for me, and things still turn out fine.

    1. sivyaleah Aug 10, 2006 01:15 PM

      I totally agree with the above. Your grill is like your cast iron grill - the less done to it the better. Just scrape the big chunks and let the preheating take care of the rest.

      1. l
        LVI Aug 11, 2006 01:49 PM

        The best way to clean a gas grill is to cover the grates with heavy-duty aluminum and turn on the grill high for 1 hour.

        2 Replies
        1. re: LVI
          l
          Leper Aug 11, 2006 07:41 PM

          LVI, This technique works even better if you spray the grates with Pam before wrapping in foil. (You can bake them in the oven as well.) They come out amazingly clean.

          1. re: Leper
            l
            LVI Aug 11, 2006 08:03 PM

            Interesting, I will try. I have always just put the aluminum over the grates. Curious as to why the Pam helps, seeing that is one extra thing that needs to burn off?

        2. r
          rootlesscosmo Aug 14, 2006 04:50 AM

          When I got a Wolf rangetop with built-in grill--almost three years ago--I asked a friend, a professional chef who was in charge of grilling at a good local restaurant, how to clean it. Her answer: "Clean?" So I do what mrsmegawatt does--get it hot, scrape off the burned chunks and let them flame off on the heating element (turn on the exhaust vent first!) and that's it.

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