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Greasing & Flouring Cake Pans

r
Reddyrat Jul 24, 2006 06:46 PM

I'm planning on making a two layer chocolate cake in a few days. I've never made a cake before.

My recipe tells me to grease the pan with shortening and then flour it.

I don't have shortening. Can I use butter instead. What about Pam spray.

Would you suggest using cocoa powder instead of flower?

Thanks,
Alison

  1. c
    Claudette Jul 24, 2006 08:41 PM

    I like Pam w/ or w/o the flour, and it works well even though it sprays unevenly. The times when I was out of parchment, I've substituted waxed paper, brown paper bags, and even large coffee filters, all more or less successfully. I prefer cocoa powder over flour for my chocolate cakes, though.

    1. d
      dano Jul 24, 2006 07:30 PM

      spray, paper, spray.

      1. b
        bruce Jul 24, 2006 07:29 PM

        Why would you avoid using Pam? I use a canola oil (another brand, not Pam) cooking spray instead of butter or shortening to grease my cake pans w/ good results. Is there something I should be concerned about?

        2 Replies
        1. re: bruce
          o
          OnceUponABite Jul 24, 2006 07:33 PM

          Me too. I've used Pam, the regular stuff, for most of my baking, for years. The cakes always turn out, not additional flour or paper needed.

          1. re: OnceUponABite
            c
            cheryl_h Jul 24, 2006 07:55 PM

            I use Pam too. Parchment is extra insurance.

        2. TorontoJo Jul 24, 2006 06:50 PM

          Yep, you can use butter instead. And yep, you can use cocoa powder to avoid any white marks on the cake (which really aren't an issue if you are frosting it).

          If you are worried about being able to turn your cake out properly, cut a round of parchment paper to fix exactly into the bottom of your pan. Grease the pan, put the parchment paper in, then grease and flour/cocoa the parchment paper. Your cake will turn out cleanly, then you can just gently peel the parchment off.

          Oh, and I would avoid Pam, unless it's specifically Pam for baking.

          3 Replies
          1. re: TorontoJo
            d
            Darren72 Jul 24, 2006 07:03 PM

            Isn't Pam for Baking essentially a mixture of oil and flour, just for this purpose? I haven't used it and I'm curious.

            1. re: Darren72
              Candy Jul 24, 2006 07:50 PM

              Yes, there is also a brand called Baker's Joy and the Kroger grocery chain has their own too. They all work pretty well but for flat bottomed cake pans I always take the precaution of using a round of parchment or waxed paper

            2. re: TorontoJo
              danna Jul 24, 2006 07:56 PM

              Exactly. Except I simply press down the parchment, smooth it around, and then flip it over. That way both sides are lightly greased.

              Then put a little flour in the pan, shake it around (over the sink, until it coats the bottom AND sides. Then, put the 2nd pan over the top, invert, smack on the side of the counter to get the remaining flour in the 2nd pan. Coat that pan, then give that one a smack to knock the excess flour (or cocoa) into the sink.

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