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Smoked Haddock

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Sixy Beast Aug 25, 2004 08:36 PM

In the 3.5 years I have been living in the USA I have never been able to find smoked haddock in the Bay Area. Never seen it once. Does anyone know of a source for it? Preferably naturally smoked rather than dyed, but either would be just fine.

BTW Smoked haddock is not like smoked salmon. It is a fresh smoked fish that needs to be cooked upon purchase.

Thanks for any tips or clues.

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    Zach Georgopoulos RE: Sixy Beast Aug 25, 2004 09:00 PM

    You might try calling some of the wholesale seafood places that also deal with the public. Peninsula Seafood, in San Bruno, comes to mind: (650)589-0532. If they don't have it, they might know where you can get it.

    4 Replies
    1. re: Zach Georgopoulos
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      Sixy beast RE: Zach Georgopoulos Aug 25, 2004 09:03 PM

      thanks
      I'll give them a call and see
      i have found a place on the East coast and a place in Scotland that can ship it to the US if its not available on the west coast

      1. re: Sixy beast
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        Zach Georgopoulos RE: Sixy beast Aug 26, 2004 12:25 AM

        Now you've got me curious about smoked Haddock. A Google search turned up a Chronicle link (below) that mentions it as being available at New World Market, 5641 Geary Blvd. (@ 21st), 751-8810. I've heard about this place and have been meaning to visit for some time now...

        Link: http://www.sfgate.com/traveler/guide/...

        1. re: Zach Georgopoulos
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          Sixy Beast RE: Zach Georgopoulos Aug 26, 2004 11:52 AM

          Wow!
          thank you.
          that seems like a result.
          i will check it out.
          thank you so much zach

          1. re: Sixy Beast
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            Gillian RE: Sixy Beast Sep 25, 2004 06:09 PM

            I've bought smoked haddock from Mollie Stone's on California in SF before. As a Scot, I had a hankering for kedgeree (smoked haddock dish with rice, apparently a throwback from the British Raj days... it's usually a brunch dish now). Anyway, it was unfortunately that bright yellow color you describe... but was tasty nonetheless

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      ed RE: Sixy Beast Aug 26, 2004 04:37 PM

      hmmm, i certainly have the impression that i've seen it, but then again i've lived in the bay area for nearly 3.5 decades. it looked interesting, perhaps a bit more expensive than the average smoked salmon, right? now where could that have been...
      saul's deli in north berkeley? dean and deluca in napa? well bugger, i can't be more helpful than that.

      5 Replies
      1. re: ed
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        Sixy Beast RE: ed Aug 26, 2004 07:13 PM

        In Britain smoked haddock is a relatively cheap fish.
        its bought fresh - so it doesnt have a long shelf life like smoked salmon does, neither does it come in those sealed packets. it has a very strong and distinct flavour which i hated as a kid but which i have started to miss as an adult.
        It used to be that it was always dyed an intense yellow colour as well as being smoked and that's the way it is generally perceived. However, these days, with people being more aware of natural food, in britian you can also now buy it naturally smoked meaning same flavour but no yellow colour. It's also become a little more fashionable. A couple of years ago I had it in a British "GastroPub" (meaning an old pub which now aspires to serving fancy food at reasonable prices). A common way of serving it would be on a bed of spinach with a poached egg and some butter or a white sauce like hollandaise. Its definitely comfort food. I am going to try Zach's World Market suggestion. He is much better at google searches than me

        1. re: ed
          s
          Sixy Beast RE: ed Aug 26, 2004 07:13 PM

          In Britain smoked haddock is a relatively cheap fish.
          its bought fresh - so it doesnt have a long shelf life like smoked salmon does, neither does it come in those sealed packets. it has a very strong and distinct flavour which i hated as a kid but which i have started to miss as an adult.
          It used to be that it was always dyed an intense yellow colour as well as being smoked and that's the way it is generally perceived. However, these days, with people being more aware of natural food, in britian you can also now buy it naturally smoked meaning same flavour but no yellow colour. It's also become a little more fashionable. A couple of years ago I had it in a British "GastroPub" (meaning an old pub which now aspires to serving fancy food at reasonable prices). A common way of serving it would be on a bed of spinach with a poached egg and some butter or a white sauce like hollandaise. Its definitely comfort food. I am going to try Zach's World Market suggestion. He is much better at google searches than me

          1. re: Sixy Beast
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            Manuel RE: Sixy Beast Aug 26, 2004 07:33 PM

            >>In Britain smoked haddock is a relatively cheap fish....Its definitely comfort food. >A common way of serving it would be on a bed of spinach with a poached egg and some butter or a white sauce like hollandaise. <<

            oooh sounds good...

            1. re: Sixy Beast
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              Manuel RE: Sixy Beast Aug 26, 2004 07:35 PM

              "In Britain smoked haddock is a relatively cheap fish....Its definitely comfort food. "

              If it's something expatriates might long for, then that British Food place (grocery store - I think it is just called 'British Food' or something) in Kirkwood Plaza, (Campbel Ave, San Joe) might well have it.

              BTW, How different are these from 'kippers?'

              "A common way of serving it would be on a bed of spinach with a poached egg and some butter or a white sauce like hollandaise. "

              oooh sounds good...

              1. re: Manuel
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                Joan Kureczka RE: Manuel Aug 26, 2004 09:54 PM

                Kippers are whole, salted and smoked herrings that also require a bit of cooking before eating -- often as simple as poaching in water or grilled with butter. While you will also see the cheap dyed version, kippers from a good smokehouse like that in the Northumbrian village of Craster are quite lovely. They are about the size of a small trout, but with lots of fine bones.

          2. r
            Robert Lauriston RE: Sixy Beast Aug 30, 2004 08:12 PM

            European Food at 3038 Clement St. has the biggest selection of smoked fish I've seen in the Bay Area, and generally better prices than the two similar stores on Geary.

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