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Turkish Pizza??

MEalcentric Jul 14, 2006 03:48 AM

Saw a post an another board for Turkish Pizza and I began to salivate? Any idea of where to get this in OC or LA?

http://www.pizza-pide.com/menu.htm

  1. Skorgirl Jul 14, 2006 04:00 AM

    The closest I can think of is one of the stands at the Farmer's Market at 3rd and Fairfax. I believe it is called Moeshe's (or something like that) Village, and it's across from the Little John Candy shop. They call their "pizzas", "boreks." I actually had a beef borek last night and thought it was really tasty. They are made to order, so the crust is always fresh and delicious. With two side orders for $7.25 I think it's a pretty good deal. They have lots of different variations, from chicken or beef to other topics like fish and veggies, spinach, fried eggs ..... the list goes on! Hope this satisfies your request!

    1. Chowpatty Jul 14, 2006 04:01 AM

      The Village at Farmer's Market specializes in borek or pide, but I don't know how authentic it is.
      Good Armenian lamajune, which is similar, can be found at Sasoun Bakery, Arax Bakery, etc. on Santa Monica near Normandie.
      http://eatingla.blogspot.com/2006/05/...

      1. b
        Burger Boy Jul 14, 2006 04:41 AM

        Partamians is great lehmajoon, the best in the city, my family has been going for 40 years.

        It is on Adams between LaBrea & Fairfax. Better than all the others, try it, you'll like it. I give a money back guarantee!

        1. j
          Joe Jul 14, 2006 05:07 AM

          First off, they're not Turkish Pizzas. It's a Middle Eastern dish known as Lahmanjun. Syrians tend to make it best and The Lebanese come a close 2nd. If you want real authentic stuff, there is a bakery on Santa Monica Blvd.(1/2 west of Normandie, in Hollyoood) named Sasoun Bakery. Fresh as they get and better then anything you'll have anywhere in So. Cal. Eaten best fresh right out of the oven. While there, also try their spicey cheese bread. The pizzas are thin and small. One can easily eat 3-4 of them. Be sure to wash it down with some Taan. It's a yogurt drink they have there which goes great with such salty foods. Sasouns also just opened up a Glendale location on Colorado Blvd., just east of Glendale Blvd.

          http://local.yahoo.com/details;_ylt=A...

          8 Replies
          1. re: Joe
            Normal Garciaparra Jul 14, 2006 10:41 PM

            Yeah Sasoun Bakery in East Hollywood's Little Armenia makes great lahmajunes. There was a place down the street on Santa Monica and Kenmore that made the absolute best but they closed down a few years ago. Sasoun makes great boreks (beuregs)too. I like the spicy cheese and the spinach.

            One word of warning, do not, I repreat DO NOT mention he word "Turkish Pizza" or anything referring to the country of Turkey in an Armenian-owned establishment. They really, really, really don't like that (the early 20th century genocide of Armenians at the hands of the Ottoman Empire is the reason).

            1. re: Normal Garciaparra
              j
              Joe Jul 14, 2006 11:13 PM

              Yes, that place was written-up about 15 or so years ago in the LA Times and I tried it but I didn't think it was that spectacular. Obviously, food can be subjective so that doesn't mean the place was bad. It just didn't wow me, that's all.

              I live in Pasadena with many bakeries within a mile of where I live but I still choose to get my lahmajune's, boregs and other bakery goods from Sasouns.

              Good sound advice. Being Armenian myself, those are words not easily swallowed by Armenians; especially the older generation. Treat the people who are about to serve you’re next meal with kindness and respect. Call me paranoid but it makes much more sense.

              1. re: Joe
                r
                rastan Sep 16, 2010 05:07 AM

                How are the lahmajunes served at Sasoun Bakery?

                In the Netherlands I’ve had "Turkse Pizza" - which is a flatbread with a thin layer of minced meat, topped with lettuce / cucumber / tomato, squirted with garlic sauce and hot sauce (sambal), and then rolled up. Fantastic. The "Turkish Pizza" I've had in Istanbul didn't have any of the toppings / sauces and was also quite delicious.

                I’ve heard that Taron Bakery at Hollywood and Kenmore has lahmajunes as well. Any idea how the two places compare?

                -----
                Sasoun Bakery
                5114 Santa Monica Blvd, Los Angeles, CA

                1. re: rastan
                  b
                  Burger Boy Sep 16, 2010 08:06 PM

                  Old Sassoun Bakery on Allen, I think, in Pasadena is really good. The best is still at Partamian's on Adams between Fairfax & LaBrea. Hands down none better!

                  -----
                  Partamian Bakery
                  5410 W Adams Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90016

                  1. re: Burger Boy
                    k
                    kevin Sep 16, 2010 11:15 PM

                    oh, that's the place, i still gotta hit it up. any clue if it's open bright and early like at 8am or 9am so i can have lamajune for breakfast???

                    1. re: kevin
                      b
                      Burger Boy Sep 17, 2010 04:15 AM

                      I believe Partamian's is open at 8 or earlier, they bake bread for other stores so the open early. Call and double check. Oooohhhhhhhh lahmajune and coffee, I like that idea.

              2. re: Normal Garciaparra
                k
                kevin Jan 23, 2007 07:52 PM

                is it ok if we call it lamajuhn or is that the turkish word> now i'm started to get confused.

                1. re: kevin
                  t
                  tigercactus Jan 24, 2007 07:57 AM

                  the turkish name is pide -- but in an armenian place call it lamajuhn.

            2. t
              TomSwift Jul 14, 2006 04:58 PM

              Try Koko's Bakery, owned by Koko Saghbazarian, at 1674 E. Washington Blvd. in Pasadena. Great breads, lahmajune and beoregs.

              1. s
                SouthOCHound Jul 14, 2006 06:45 PM

                As for OC, I know I've seen it on some menues -- probably in Little Gaza. I know for a fact that Rosines in Anaheim Hills has it and I'd be willing to bet that Moonlight Chikcen and Pizza does, too.

                1. t
                  tigercactus Jan 24, 2007 07:58 AM

                  how similar is lamjohn to pide? we had great pide during our honeymoon in turkey...

                  1 Reply
                  1. re: tigercactus
                    s
                    SouthOCHound Jan 24, 2007 03:44 PM

                    I have no idea. I just happened to notice it on their menu and never got around to trying it. But since Rosine’s specifies that it is “Armenian pizza” – I would presume hers would bear the hallmarks of the Armenian version, if there is such a thing.

                    It may be worth noting, however, that given Armenia's location between Turkey, Iran and the Near East and its proximity to Eastern Europe and the Mediterranean, many of the dishes in Armenian cuisine are notably similar to dishes found in Persian, Turkish, Greek, and even Eastern European cuisine. Hence a very similar dish known by many different names across many different cultures (e.g., lamaju, lahmejune or lehmajoun [alternative Armenian spellings], lahmacun [Greek], lamajoon [Kurdish], lahm bi-ajin [Arabic], kiymali or pide [Turkish]) or perhaps referred to simply as Armenian pizza.

                    As to the specific differences between any two versions, I cannot personally say. There appear to be as many differences as there are similarities. A worldlier man than I would go out and try them all and report back.

                    That or write a freakin’ dissertation on the subject…

                  2. d
                    dnhaider30 Jun 27, 2010 12:40 AM

                    Lamacun and Pide are not the same, at least the Turkish versions. Lamacun is flatter and round with minced meat (typically) and pide are very long with a thicker crust and some even being stuffed (such as the trabzon style pide.) The pide are also uaually cut into pieces. But this is the Turkish version I am not versed on the Armenian version.

                    1. f
                      fredder Jun 27, 2010 01:35 PM

                      Perfect,

                      Thanks for the help.

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