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Durgin Park question

Ali G Jul 10, 2006 04:53 PM

I've passed this place a million times, but usually steer clear of restaurants in Fanuel hall area. However, I've heard they have pretty good Prime Rib and I wanted to go for my birthday this weekend. I was told it's all family style or community seating (ie. one large table). Is this true for the entire restaurant or is it possible to get a table for 2?

Follow up question - is there a better place for a great Prime Rib? I've always enjoyed the Stockyard but wanted something different...Durgin Park or one of the several high-end, overpriced steakhouses came to mind.

  1. t
    TheScribe Jul 10, 2006 06:51 PM

    It is mostly family style seating. Not sure about a table for two. But the prime rib has, historically, been impressive. So big that it falls off the plate.

    1. c
      curiousgeo Jul 10, 2006 06:53 PM

      I was pleasantly surprised with the prime rib at Durgin Park, much better than I thought it would be at a place like this. There are those community tables, but when we went for dinner it wasn't too crowded. We sat at a table that seated 4 people and you can also sit downstairs at some booths, so that shouldn't be a problem unless it is packed. Great old time atmosphere, but not dressy like a high end steakhouse, if that is what you are looking for.

      1. m
        mwk Jul 10, 2006 07:33 PM

        I love Durgin Park's Prime Rib. I think it's a great value and very tasty. As for the seating arrangements, they do have some tables that just seat 4 people, and if it's not crowded, they would probably seat two there.

        1. Notorious EMDB Jul 11, 2006 12:23 AM

          I third the prime rib. Get lots of corn bread, creamed corn or spinach, and stewed tomatoes as sides. Yum.

          1. MC Slim JB Jul 11, 2006 01:16 AM

            Durgin-Park is pretty much the only restaurant near Faneuil Hall that I have any use for, and it's hard not to get the prime rib every time. Indian pudding for dessert here is an interesting, rarely-seen, Colonial-era treat, basically a baked cornmeal porridge sweetened with sugar and molasses. Communal tables are part of the experience. I've found that the brusque-waitress shtick has been toned down a bit in recent years.

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