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Electric stoves

My husband and I are moving to a different house, and the only downside is that there is no natural gas in the entire neighborhood. We live in the Phoenix area, and it seems that in the 70s there was a natural gas shortage, and entire neighborhoods were built with no natural gas lines.

I HATE electric stoves! But I am going to have to adapt. Can anyone help me in my search for the least objectionable model and type? Generally, the reason I hate them is because they heat and cool more slowly than gas stoves, and because it's difficult to tell by looking which burners are hot I've had a tendency to set off smoke alarms because I have turned off the burner that I wanted to be hot and turned on the burner under a pan that was supposed to be on low. And then there is the issue with my cats, who must explore new spaces and will no doubt be wandering across the stove at some point and I don't want burned kitty toes.

I've thought of propane but that is probably a huge deal because you have to get your tank refilled by a propane truck, so I'm pretty much resigned to electric.

The up-side of the move is that we will have almost an acre of land and I intend to acquire some chickens post haste, so eventually I may have some lovely fresh eggs.

kittyfood (pka Sarah C)

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  1. You are in luck Induction cooking has hit the USA in a big way...electric, more efficient than gas, more btu's and instantaneous control.....
    a number of manufacturers have them (they are big in Europe and Asia..
    Here is a link from Sears...which will give you the complete story...with videos even!!!

    http://www.sears.com/sr/javasr/dpp.do...

    1. If induction does not work out for you I can assure you that Propane is no big deal. I bought a house already on propane and heard horror stories but that was all they turned out to be. propane is clean and efficient

      1. Hmmm -- induction sounds great but it looks like it only comes in cooktops so far, and they're pretty expensive. I will do some research but not sure I want to spend nearly $2,000 just for the cooktop and then more for the oven. Plus, my husband says the current cabinets which we intend to reuse are set up for a free standing range.

        1 Reply
        1. re: kittyfood

          I couldn't find any freestanding stoves either..when I googled...Apparently in the rest of the world the prices are much lower.....
          I am including a link from a Washington Post article..giving the history...pricing problems, mention of Consumer Reports Review etc...
          Propane sounds like a nice alternative...you could even connect an outdoor gas BBQ to
          it!

          http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/...

        2. If I were in your situation I'd convert to propane. A 250-gallon tank wouldn't need refilling very often if you're using propane just for cooking. Lots of rural dwellers around here use it. I've cooked in propane-fired kitchens, and it was fine. I hate electric cooktops, too, but have no problem with electric ovens.

          Jim

          1. Look for ovens that have hidden burners on the bottom and recessed burners on the top; you have more usable space that way and can get food lower or higher as needed. Amana has some like this that are affordable and attractive.

            1. You might look into dual fuel stoves - propane/gas cooktop and electric convection oven combos. This could be run with a relatively small propane tank and you could even keep a lifeboat BBQ size tank just in case.

              1. Had to make the same decision and opted for propane. Wish I had chosen the dual fuel option, as my Viking with the propane oven is NOT self cleaning. Yeow! How I hate that cleaning site.
                The next stove I buy will definitely have the dual fuel feature, I con't care what it costs! In eight years, doing some serious cooking for the two of us and every-so-often for a dozen or more friends, I've only filled the 250-gallon propane tank twice. Go for it and avoid electric if at all possible.

                1. I just wanted to assure you that you will be able to adjust. I moved into a home with electric too, we could have put in the gas line easily but for some reason, I let my husband talk me out of it when renovating the kitchen. I dont' know what I was thinking at the time.

                  Anyway, here it is 3 years later and while I still regret the choice, I can say I never burn anything at all. I still make perfect eggs - never burned a single one. Never ruined a pot of rice either tho maybe I came close the first week or so. It does take some getting used to, put isn't too bad. The only thing I really miss is the open flame for blistering peppers and such.

                  We have a Kenmore, we didn't do a very high end kitchen (it's a small one) with glass top, flat elements, 4 burners, 1 of which is a warmer, 1 is a high energy one and another is a dual element, either small or a larger oval size if you like so it's more like 5 burners. The oven goes up to 500, which is pretty good. Has a warming drawer which frankly I use more for extra pan storage but have used on occassion for keeping plates or finished foods warm and it works nicely.

                  It isn't too bad keeping clean - I use a glass cleaner for simple spills, and there's a special cleanser for bigger problems. Personally, I kind of like it because the flat top acts as extra counter space when not in use during prep work.

                  As for your kitties, thats problematic, but cats are smart and hopefully after one hot foot, they will avoid it thereafter.

                  Laurie

                  1. I feel ya Kittyfood. My ideal would be a gas hybrid - gas cooktop and electric oven. I recently purchased a GE profile with a very large oven.(I think that the convection ovens are just too tiny!) The model number is JS905 and I bought it on ebay and saved around five hundred dollars! The oven door is nice and heavy- the stove has some neat features! Check it out on the GE site. As far as the cats go I have two thoughts. Get a spray bottle and squirt them whenever you catch them on the stove. The other thought is that those cats are going to be preoccupied with your yardbirds more than your stove!