HOME > Chowhound > General Topics >

Discussion

Salt free Popcorn - where can I buy it?

  • c

I love popcorn but am having a most difficult time finding NO SALT popcorn. Seems that every manufacturer adds salt.

Any ideas or suggestions for where I can find good-tasting microwave or non-microwave salt free popcorn? TIA.

  1. Click to Upload a photo (10 MB limit)
Delete
  1. Why microwave when you can make it fresh? Get the Whirley Pop (~$25), its an aluminum gadget with a little crank.

    Its the BEST!! And money well spent...my popcorn is always perfectly cooked and tastes sooo much better, you will never go back to microwavable popcorn. And it doesn't take any longer either.

    My absolute addiction is homemade kettle corn. I use extra virgin olive oil to be healthy, a little sugar and a pinch of salt.

    I kid you not, I was corn fed morning and night everyday for a good month or two until I had to lend my Whirley Pop to a friend. Now he wants to give me money for it!

    MOOOOOOO!

    1. The cheapest and simplest method: throw a couple of handfuls of popcorn in a paper bag, close the end by folding it over two or three times and microwave it for 3 minutes (time varies with your microwave). I love the convenience of this! The only tricky part is finding fresh popcorn as there isn't so much demand for it anymore.

      3 Replies
      1. re: Meg
        b
        BluPlateSpec

        If you can get to the Union Square Farmers Market on Saturday, you can get good popping corn from the stand of the Blew Family, Oak Grove Mills. It's situated across from the Cingular store. We make it in the paper bag method described and punch two small slots in the bag before popping to vent steam. We use no salt by personal choice. I'd suggest starting with one and a half minutes cooking time, it is possible to burn the corn, so build up to the best time for your microwave.

        1. re: Meg
          j
          JK Grence (the Cosmic Jester)

          I've found Orville Redenbacher in the plastic jar to be pretty reliable.

          Link: http://thecosmicjester.blogspot.com

          1. re: Meg

            Farmer Steve in NJ organcially grows popcorn.
            www.farmersteve.com

            Link: http://www.farmersteve.com/

          2. I think the only option is to make it yourself. I prefer making it on the stovetop, but you can also use a brown lunch bag and the microwave.

            1. Or you could get a hot air popper - No salt or oil. Throw on your own choice of additives.

              3 Replies
              1. re: yayadave

                Seriously, hot air is the way to go. You can use any kind of corn, and a little bit of butter and/or olive oil (they compliment each other well) will go a long way for taste.

                1. re: yayadave
                  j
                  JK Grence (the Cosmic Jester)

                  We have one of those around here. After we discovered stovetop poppers, the hot air popper is used exclusively for roasting coffee.

                  Link: http://thecosmicjester.blogspot.com

                  1. re: JK Grence (the Cosmic Jester)

                    Interesting...I've made stovetop popcorn using a pot and oil (very easy) but I gather this is something different. Can you say a bit more? Does it require oil to pop the corn?

                2. You can find all kinds of No-Salt products at the Healthy Heart Market website. They have microwave no-salt popcorn. Great source for those living with heart disease.

                  www.healthyheartmarket.com

                  Dana

                  1. You should really try making your own. Get yourself a WHIRLY POP stovetop popper. It pops corn in less time than microwave... and you can have it any way you choose. Low fat, low salt,no salt, garlic etc.

                    It is a great thing to buy yourself for less than $20. They often turn up for auction on eBay.

                    I have had mine for years, and would never go back to microwave.

                    1. Both Bearito and Newman's Own make organic salt-free microwave popcorn as part of their product lines. Bearito's is also 100% fat-free; the Newman's is 94% fat-free. The popcorn they use is perfectly OK.

                      These are both national brands; I find them at Fairway in NYC.

                      1. You can buy eight pounds of Orville Redenbacher's popcorn at
                        CostCo for six dollars. No salt added. It's in a big jar so you have
                        to do the paper bag thing if you want it popped in the microwave.

                        Eight pounds of popcorn is probably enough to fill the kitchen.

                        1 Reply
                        1. re: Attaturk

                          I recall the whirlypop-type popcorn maker as needing a quarter or third of a cup of corn to make a whole lot of great popcorn. I use very little oil, when it's hot I throw in three kernels and when they all pop, I throw in the corn and a tablespoon of butter. It all pops and at the heat I cook it, in the time it takes to pop the corn, the butter doesn't burn. You could, of course, not put the butter in.

                        2. Whole Foods sells just plain popcorn no salt or butter or additives.

                          1. Salt enhances preservation for a product that is stored on marked shelves. Since it's so easy to make popcorn at home without salt, I don't see sufficient market demand for a salt-free prepopped shelf-stable product.

                            1. I say make your own, too. I work with special needs kids and teacher often has a snack for them. Classroom has microwave and sink. When I came in with a bag of kernels and a pack of brown paper "lunch" bags (from Dollar store), the TEACHER looked at me like I had 3 heads!?! The kids were learning basic measuring and fractions. They could measure in TBSPs or smallest measuring cup and learn equivalents. Maybe 2-3 T of kernels, top of bag folded over, and short spin (about a minute and a half or so), and full bag of popcorn with pretty much no unpopped kernels, no salt/oil, and the right size for a snack.

                              When niece was about 12-13, I had her totally mesmerized when I put a little oil & kernels into a large pot... she just stared thru the glass lid. She had NEVER had real popcorn in her life... kinda sad.