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What's the difference...

  • a

...between a calzone and stromboli? The shape? The contents? The dough or bread used?
Inquiring minds want to know.

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  1. d
    Das Ubergeek

    Where I grew up (and let's face it, there's bound to be regional differences) a calzone was shaped more like a crescent moon and always contained ricotta as well as mozzarella and whatever toppings you wanted. A stromboli was more oblong and flatter, though still made from pizza dough, and contained no ricotta but typically had one or two meats plus onions, peppers and mozzarella.

    4 Replies
    1. re: Das Ubergeek

      sounds about right to me. additionally, a calzone is completely enclosed, while a stromboli might be slashed across the top or covered with braided strips of dough.

      1. re: mark

        We have a local very popular pizza place that makes what they call a calzone. It's cooked in a pizza pan,crust on bottom, fillings in center then covered with another crust. It's really very good but I question wether this is really a calzone.

        1. re: AMM
          d
          Das Ubergeek

          That sounds like stuffed pizza to me.

          1. re: AMM

            Definately what I would call a stuffed pizza.

      2. A stromboli is named for the famous volcano. It's supposed to have slits in the crust for a primarily mozzarella-based filling to erupt and flow like a bit of white lava. They are often oblong shaped.

        A calzone is supposed to be shaped like an old fashioned pocked (like a half-moon), no slits, and has a lighter filling that has more ricotta than mozarella. Ideally, the crust is a bit thinner than for a stromboli.

        Nowadays, what one often finds is a stromboli filling it what otherwise passes for a calzone. Sigh.

        1. This old thread should be of help...

          Link: http://www.chowhound.com/topics/show/...

          1. According to my Food Lover's Companion (my bible at work):
            "Calzone: Originating in Naples, calzone is a half-moon shaped stuffed pizza. It is usually made as an individual serving. The fillings can be various meats, vegetables or cheese; mozzarella is the cheese used most frequently. Calzones can be deep-fried or brushed with olive oil and baked."
            "Stromboli: A specialty of Philadelphia, a stromboli is a CALZONElike enclosed sandwich of cheese (usually Mozzarella) and Pepperoni (or other meat) wrapped in pizza dough."

            10 Replies
            1. re: Renee

              Ever had deep fried calzone? What a artery clogging, wonderful experience. Dough is like fried dough you get at county fairs and the cheese melts into every little corner. I haven't seen anyplace that deep fries their calzone since I lived outside of Poughkeepsie, NY.

              1. re: rl

                Ahhh, memories. Four Corner's Pizza in Pelham Manor, N.Y. used to have great, deep-fried calzones. I still remember the day they moved to a baked calzone. What a terrible day that was.

                1. re: Pete G.
                  s
                  Seamus Mitwurst

                  In my family (Yonkers Italians) we had a dish called cazzatelle or cozatelle(I can't confirm the spelling but we bastardized it to sound like "cazateel" but then ricotta sounds like "rigut" right?).

                  Now, Sicilian cazzatelle is a dessert of sweetend ricotta in a fried dough/pastry.

                  Ours was savory. Always ground pork, ricotta and mozzarella fried in a yeast dough. It was divine. I still have my grandma's recipe, but I can't confirm this dish on the internets. I can't even figure out the correct way to spell it.

                  Anyone else ever heard of it?

                  1. re: Seamus Mitwurst

                    Wow! I never thougfht I'd be reading about something my Grandfather used to make for Easter when I was a kid. Casatelle (often pronounced Casatedde using Sicilian dialect) are indeed similar to Calzone in that they are shaped the same, but I only know them as being sweet. The filling he used to make was ricotta, sugar, a few chocolate chips, and possibly some eggs. Maybe a dash of vanilla. He would bascially make a bread dough (Not sweet) and then fill with the sweetened ricotta mixture and fry them. Your Grandmother's way of making them savory, I have never heard of. But you know, years ago they might have seen calzones and thought, well we (as Sicilians)make those too, we just call them Cassatelle. In any case your description of her's certainly sounds great and I'd really appreciate seeing the recipe. Any chance that you'd either post it on the cooking board or email it to me?

                    1. re: Chas
                      s
                      Seamus Mitwurst

                      We actually have a family recipe for calzone, too. They are drastically different. I recall the cazzatelle having a higher mozzarella to ricotta ratio.

                      I would happily share the recipe in either manner.

                      I will post it to the Home Cooking board so that others may try it. Someone may even be able to confirm the existence of this dish or give an alternate recipe.

                      Oddly enough, I remember this dish being served at Easter, too. We also had a ricotta pie (no italian name attached to it) that somehow came to be known as Barbasol Pie because it smelled like my brother's deodorant. It was sweet with a regular pie crust (latticed top) and contained candies citron. Mmmmm...Easter.

                      I'll try to remember to post this as soon as I get home and find my Mom's recipe.

                      1. re: Seamus Mitwurst

                        "Barbisol Pie" That is funny :) Now I'll know what to do if I run out of Mitchum Roll-On around Easter...LOL!!!!!

                        Seriously, the pie you're describing could be what's called Pizza Grana. It's made with cooked wheat berries, ricotta and I think citron as well. And it is sweet. Pizza Rustica, on the other hand is also an Easter pie but while it does have ricotta in it, it is NOT sweet. Many recipes call for diced pepperoni or dried sausage to be mixed in. My Grandmother's recipe also had hardboiled eggs in the mixture and ROMANO cheese!!!! What makes her's really different is the filling is savory, the pastry is sweet. That type of pastry crust is called Pasta Friolla or Frolla. So her Pizza Rustica was a combination of sweet, savory. I'm curious to know if your family made Sicilian Easter Bread. My Grandfather's was made with flour, yeast, eggs, lard and a good amount of black pepper. I have never seen a recipe for it or a description of it anywhere. Thanks in advance for posting the recipe for the calzone.

                        1. re: Chas
                          s
                          Seamus Mitwurst

                          I posted the recipe (and my family's ricotta pie).

                          Our pie is sans grains, so I guess it would be more of a pastiera. Thanks Google.

                          I need to find out exactly what region the fam is from.
                          Definitely not Sicilia, so no Sicilian Easter Bread.

                          1. re: Seamus Mitwurst
                            b
                            bob oppedisano

                            What a fascinating thread. Paleo pizzerias ( ca. 1950/60) usually had simple calzones--the flopped over pizza "pants" (calze =pants, calzone = big pants), with basic ricotta/mozzarella fillings, usually fried, sometimes baked. Sometime after, variations emerged--the stromboli, as so carefully tracked here--and something that was called, variously, a[n] "ippy" or "hippy" roll. Which was a kind of stromboli. Which maybe disappeared. Which may have been the provenance of (gasp) non-Italian pizzerias.
                            So many questions, so little counter space.

                            1. re: Seamus Mitwurst
                              b
                              bob oppedisano

                              What a fascinating thread. Paleo pizzerias ( ca. 1950/60) usually had simple calzones--the flopped over pizza "pants" (calze =pants, calzone = big pants), with basic ricotta/mozzarella fillings, usuallky fried, sometimes baked. Sometime after, variations emerged--the stromboli, as so carefully tracked here--and something that was called, with varian spellings, a "ippy" or "hippy" roll. Which was a kind of stromboli. Which maybe disappeared. Which may have been the provenance of (gasp) non-Italian pizzerias.
                              So many questions, so little counter space.

                  2. re: rl

                    Fried calzone is called panzerotti in Philly and New Jersey. Way better than the baked calzone's on the West Coast. I'll have to get a frozen one and try deep frying at home.

                2. All other posters have basically stated the differences. But just to add my 2 cents, Calzones as far as I know were always fried. When the Mt. Carmel Feast would start up in the Willliamsburg section of Brooklyn every year, the big anticipation was fried calzones from the feast. Back then (late 60's) no pizzeria made any type of calzone; even the baked ones. I haven't been in 10 yrs but downtown on the corner of Mott and Broome was (still is?) a Pizzeria called Sal's. And they made fried calzones that were better than anything I remember from the feasts. The classic filling at the feast was ricotta and mozzerella and if you wanted they'd make it with a slice of ham in the middle. I assume the original meat back in Italy was prosciutto. Well at Sal's you could order it with prosciutto. They were unbelievably good! Another place downtown that fried them was Florio's on Grand St. Their's were really good as well. I recently read that Mario Battali in one of his rest's, Otto, makes fried calzone but only on Mondays; the rest of the time they are baked. There is NOTHING like a good fried calzone. :)

                  2 Replies
                  1. re: Chas

                    Your fried calzone sounds like panzarotti.

                    1. re: IlseM.

                      Just Googled panzarotti, it seems to be a fried ravioli. So the dough would be just flour and eggs. No yeast. Pasta dough not bread/pizza dough as used in calzones. That would result in something altogether different in texture than Calzone. While I've munched on fried rav's once or twice in the past, they were just OK. But I bet if they were made with good ingredients they could be really great.