HOME > Chowhound > General Topics >

Discussion

Filet Mignon, Porterhouse, Ribeye or New York Strip?

  • s

What is your favorite steak? Going to a great steakhouse and considering the choices. Growing up we normally had T-Bone/Porterhouse tons of time on the charcoal grill. Yum. Usually get that or a NY Strip now.

  1. Click to Upload a photo (10 MB limit)
Delete
  1. Well, filet is usually a bland waste of time; I think of it a beefier veal, mostly a vehicle for a sauce. Bone-in meat is usually best, but a porterhouse is usually too big for me. The strip and the ribeye thus stand as the preferreds for me, in that order.

    6 Replies
    1. re: Karl S.

      Huge prime rib washed down with massive quantities of Stout

      1. re: Karl S.

        Unless someone can really twist my arm, I never apply any sauce to my beef, and especially a Filet, but that is just me.

        Hunt

        1. re: Bill Hunt

          I'm twisting :) Here's Julia Child's recipe for Steak Diane.

          http://www.italianbellavita.com/2012/...

          This was a huge first "big girl" dinner party dish. It's lovely.

          1. re: Bill Hunt

            If someone serves me hollandaise or bernaise sauce, I am going to eat it. Sure, I prefer my steak to be un-adorned, but how do I get these luscious sauces into my mouth without a vehicle? Yes, I sop the sauce off my plate with bread, but that doesn't get all of it; neither does the asparagus. Filet seems like a good way to transfer these sauces to me, while, at the same time, improving the steak.

            Sure, I could dunk my bread in the sauce or merely just drink it, but that always seems uncouth. Scooping it up on my fork with a less tastier cut of meat, like filet, has always seemed more appropriate.

            1. re: MonMauler

              At one of our daughters' wedding reception, there was a piece of filet with a cognac cream sauce in a litle pitcher. It was wonderful.

            2. re: Bill Hunt

              My favorite steak preparation involves a NY strip and a compound butter containing lemon and thyme. It is sublime.

          2. definitely Ribeye. i used to be a porterhouse, shell steak fan, but have switched to ribeye, which I consider to be more tender and tastier.

            1. Ribeye if I'm the only one eating steak.

              Porterhouse if I have someone to share with as it's too large for just me.

              2 Replies
              1. re: MicDago

                Now that I'm the only carnivore in the house, I get meat only at lunchtime or when Mrs. O dines out with her old school friends, which is most Thursdays. My favorite steak is porterhouse; yes, it's too big for me too. So I grill it somewhere between rare and medium-rare, trim out and bag the tenderloin, and then have the sirloin for supper. Next day I slice up the tenderloin, give the strips a fast sizzle in some butter, and have some truly fine steak and eggs for lunch. Don't do that very often, but it's a lovely sometime luxury.

                1. re: Will Owen

                  Will, that's an awesome idea. Thanks.

              2. Porterhouse!

                John

                1. The Ribeye is too fatty and the porterhouse too big so I usually go with the strip.

                  I only like a filet if its been Pittsburgh'd.

                  3 Replies
                  1. re: BlueHerons

                    What is Pittsburgh'd?

                    1. re: valerie

                      Charred on the outside, essentially raw in the center. Also referred to as "black and blue." Very difficult to reproduce at home and even for some restaurants. You can cheat by starting with a frozen piece of meat, but the results are not really the same.

                      1. re: FlyFish

                        Correct. You really must have a professional kitchen to properly Pittsburgh a filet. My husband, a former restauranteur does the best. I think the grill has to be something obscene like 1500 degrees.

                        He uses butter with a very high percentage of milkfat to char the steak on the outside.