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ill effects from too much rich food??

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my s/o and I ate dinner last night at a fantastic American/French restaurant. We had nine courses which were all fabulous, but very very rich in fat - including foie gras and butter sauces, etc. We also had 3 or 4 glasses of wine and a cocktail (but over four hours). For the past couple of months we've been dieting by limiting our caloric intake and cutting down our portion sizes and trying to stay away from dessert and fatty foods. We haven't been drinking much alcohol either.

We didn't sleep well at all last night and had stomach problems - S/o felt sick to his stomach all night and even now, 12 hours later, I still feel kind of sick and it doesn't feel anything like a drinking hangover.

So here's the question (yes, finally): could it be we ate something that was bad - like a bad clam or are our bodies just freaking out over last night's meal??

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  1. It's probably just that your body was not used to such rich foods. Happened to me the first time I went to New Orleans. I was SO looking forward to all the great food that I had heard so much about and when I got there, I stuffed myself with all that decadent food. Halfway through the trip my stomach just felt so full but quesy that I couldn't enjoy any other meal. Thankfully, I had already gone to Uglesich's. :)

    1. yes, I've felt the same way. Unfortunately, my most recent bout of "I can't eat that much fat" came from having a chopped hash plate w/ french fries and onion rings NOT Foie Gras, but, I think the phenomenon is the same.

      1. I've had this happen to me from eating too much rich food--I'm just not used to it. The effect can last a few days.

        Just drink lots of water, eat dry crackers, and stick to a light, simple diet for a few days.

        3 Replies
        1. re: Colleen

          Eat a couple of bananas everyday, too, to help bring the body back into balance.

          1. re: Colleen

            dry crackers will seal you up - constipation supreme.

            1. re: Fred

              Maybe for some. Dry crackers and LOTS of water (which I mentioned) are my remedy for an upset stomach. Water is key. I prefer this route to antacids or over the counter stomach remedies.

              There really aren't any foods that "seal you up" or "bind you up," by the way--they're just low-fibre foods that digest pretty completely, leaving no residue for the bowel to work on. So if you eat them as a major part of your diet, then yes, you will be constipated.

          2. sincere thanks for all your responses! I'm really glad to know it's just a food "hangover" and not any type of food poisoning!! well the meal was definitely good enough that I think we can put up with a little suffering in addition to the wallet lightening. it will be a while before we eat a meal like that again.

            1. It is my understanding (admittedly imperfect), that the French suffer from liver aches like we in the USA often suffer from indigestion, the cause being their rich, fatty diet. I'm not personally sure that I would recognize an ache in my liver if I had one(an ache in my liver).

              I CAN remember moving from Florida, where fresh produce was always plentiful and formed the nexus of my meals. When I arrived in the Midwest, market availability and budget constraints conspired against me for as long as I lived there. I was not used to eating such heavy meals. The fat and starch did not agree with me, and I suffered accordingly.

              That said, you might also be a bit dehydrated. When I have a "hangover" effect, it is almost always from dehydration. Overindulgence in anything takes itÂ’s toll; lack of hydration multiplies that toll.

              When in doubt, drink more water. When not in doubt, drink more water.

              I also second the judicious ingestion of bland crackers. It will help to reintroduce your system to solid foods.

              1. In some cultures, like for example Indonesian, there is a word that describes this feeling. The word is "blenger" which has no English equivalent other than that "queasy, I'm going to be sick because this food is too rich feeling." It also goes to describe the taste of foods which are too heavy and rich in flavor. For example red meat slathered in butter and melted cheese would be "blenger" when compared to a fresh fruit salad which can be described with the antonym, "sedap"...which has a meaning close to "refreshing and mouth watering."