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The Joys of Pork Tenderloin

l
Lila Apr 8, 2004 10:27 AM

Last night I made my first ever pork tenderloin and it was easy and fabulous. The recipe came from Epicurious and involved making slits into the meat and stuffing in slivers of garlic, then seasoning with salt, pepper, and cumin, browning it, then adding broth and wine to the pan and popping it into the oven for 10 minutes.

Totally fantastic. Now I'm dying to know other preparations for this cut of meat... Please share.

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  1. d
    Dipsy RE: Lila Apr 8, 2004 10:54 AM

    Timely question. I've been doing a similar roast tenderloin for years and was getting bored, though it's easy and very tasty. I found a great recipe on Epicurious for slivered pork tenderloin in a lime cream sauce. I wasn't convinced it would be great but I had all the ingredients on hand and decided to try. The sauce had a really nice snap to it. I subsituted pancetta as I didn't have bacon, and the pork took quite a bit longer to cook than the two minutes indicated in the recipe, but it was a big hit.

    Link: http://www.epicurious.com/run/recipe/...

    4 Replies
    1. re: Dipsy
      j
      josephsm RE: Dipsy Apr 8, 2004 01:30 PM

      If you brine the meat ahead of time per the instructions in the Zuni Cafe cookbook, you will have a religious experience (probably not a kosher one) upon sampling the finished result.

      I brine, rub with oil and chile powder, and then throw on the grill.

      1. re: josephsm
        s
        Spade RE: josephsm Apr 8, 2004 04:00 PM

        I have the ZC Cookbook, so I'll have to go back and look at this. Do you mean traditional brining (saltwater) or does she do the advance salt-curing thing she does for her famous roasted chicken to pork tenderloin also?

        I bought a pre-brined tenderloin awhile back (it was on sale), which seem to be appearing more and more. They call it something else ("enhanced" or something), and it was pretty darn good. Not willing to pay extra for it if I can do it myself, though.

        1. re: Spade
          j
          josephsm RE: Spade Apr 9, 2004 10:04 AM

          You just plop the pork tenderloin in a salt and sugar water solution for up to 3 days in the fridge beforehand. I think the cookbook recommends warming the water to extract the most flavor out of the chile peppers and a few other spices that are also in the brine, but I have never done that.

          I tried her salted roasted chicken and bread salad stuffing recipe too, but it was not worth the work. Next time I am in SF I want to try the real thing.

          1. re: josephsm
            p
            peg RE: josephsm Apr 11, 2004 04:53 AM

            ..I am brining a HUGE chicken (7.57 pounds? Whoa!) using the ZC brine method prior to roasting it tomorrow. It will be rubbed with a homemade herbes de Provence blend, heavy on the lavender, and ultimately glazed with lavender honey. No bread salad, but I am using the fine Zuni buttermilk mashed spuds recipe, with the addition of some roasted garlic cloves.

            Haven't used so mild a brine before, for such a long time - two days now - and on a whole bird. Bulletins as events warrant.

    2. b
      Bob Moffatt RE: Lila Apr 8, 2004 12:50 PM

      Cha Shao Pork

      1 lb pork fillet
      1 Tbs mild oil
      1 Tbs honey

      Marinade

      2 Tbs light soy
      ½ Tbs sugar
      1 Tbs Rice Wine
      1/8 tsp 5 spice
      1 clove garlic
      ¼ tsp pepper
      ½ tsp salt
      ¼ tsp mixed herbs
      Cochineal or red food colouring

      Slice loins into long strip down the middle.

      Mix marinade. Stand pork in overnight. Turn often.

      Drain, reserve marinade.

      Roast 12 mins @ 220 deg c. Baste with oil and marinade.

      Reduce to 180 deg C for 10 mins

      Baste with honey, roast 5 mins.

      Serve hot or cold

      Slice thinly cross-grain.

      1. f
        Fatemeh RE: Lila Apr 8, 2004 01:34 PM

        This is our favorite cut - we buy the vacuum sealed ones at TJs - they can be kept for at least 10 days, and are a great item to have in the fridge for nights when we forget to get a "main course" meat.

        Here's one of my favorites:

        In a mortar & pestle, crush to a fine powder the following:
        - seeds from 15 - 20 pods of green cardamom
        - 1 Tbsp cumin seeds
        - 1 star anise pod
        - 1/8 tsp each of allspice, cinnamon & fenugreek
        - heavy pinch of good, coarse salt
        - peppercorns to taste (i like a combo of white & green)

        Rub the pork with a blend of 1 part EVOO to 1 part sesame oil, then pat the spice rub on well.

        from this point, you can sear, then finish in the oven(which i prefer), or you can roast from start to finish.

        I like to serve these with roasted root veggies (beet, shallot, garlic, potato, carrot & parsnip) & quinoa.

        1. n
          Nancy Berry RE: Lila Apr 8, 2004 01:37 PM

          There's a wonderful recipe for pork tenderloin with a cilantro pesto at this link:

          Link: http://www.cooksrecipes.com/pork/pork...

          1. g
            Greg RE: Lila Apr 8, 2004 02:00 PM

            No matter what the preparation method, I always brine it for about 4 hours or more in a salt, brown sugar and pepper solution. Then I rinse it off and season and BBQ or roast it. The brining seems to make it even more moist and gives me a bit more room for error if I overcook the meat.

            1. j
              John Kent RE: Lila Apr 8, 2004 04:11 PM

              My favorite recipe is from Epicurious - see link.

              Link: http://www.epicurious.com/run/recipe/...

              1. t
                Tom Steele RE: Lila Apr 8, 2004 04:17 PM

                This has been a big hit every time I've made it. It's based on a dish I was served in Barcelona.

                Pork Tenderloin Medallions Stuffed With Cheese and Pimientos

                This is fast, and just intensely delicious. Do try to find Tetilla cheese. It’s a cow’s milk melting cheese shaped like a woman’s breast (hence the name). It grates quite easily. If your friendly cheese monger doesn’t have it, try www.tienda.com.

                And I find that Goya’s bottled pimientos (about $1.29 for a small glass jar) work well here; something about red peppers improves if they’ve been canned or bottled and had time to think things over. The same goes for canned pumpkin, in my book.

                2 pork tenderloins, 1 1/2-2 lbs.,
                sliced into 1 1/2” medallions and flattened with a mallet
                to make the cutlets about the same size, and 1/4-1/8" thin
                1/3 lb. Tetilla cheese, grated (or Fontina, in a pinch
                )2 imported canned/bottled pimientos, cut into 1/4” strips
                flour for dusting
                2 eggs, lightly beaten
                1 1/2 cups dry unseasoned bread crumbs
                salt, pepper
                1 teaspoon dried oregano
                3 tablespoons olive oil

                Match up the cutlets so that two will fit together. Divide the cheese, then the pimiento strips, on top of four “bottom” cutlets, leaving 1/2-inch border. Top with the other halves. Pound the edges lightly to seal. (But don’t get hysterical if they don’t fully adhere. They’ll behave after their little rest.) Dust with flour, dip in the beaten egg, then coat with crumbs that have been seasoned nicely with salt, pepper, and the oregano. Repeat with remaining pairs of cutlets until they’re all used—you’ll have 6-8 stuffed medallions. Let them rest for about 20 minutes.

                Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium heat and fry the cutlets until golden brown, 2-3 minutes per side.

                Serve with a pound and a half of baby Yukon Gold potatoes quartered or halved and roasted in goose fat.

                Yield: 2 ample servings

                1. t
                  Tom Steele RE: Lila Apr 8, 2004 04:18 PM

                  This has been a big hit every time I've made it. It's based on a dish I was served in Barcelona.

                  Pork Tenderloin Medallions Stuffed With Cheese and Pimientos

                  This is fast, and just intensely delicious. Do try to find Tetilla cheese. It’s a cow’s milk melting cheese shaped like a woman’s breast (hence the name). It grates quite easily. If your friendly cheese monger doesn’t have it, try www.tienda.com.

                  And I find that Goya’s bottled pimientos (about $1.29 for a small glass jar) work well here; something about red peppers improves if they’ve been canned or bottled and had time to think things over. The same goes for canned pumpkin, in my book.

                  2 pork tenderloins, 1 1/2-2 lbs.,
                  sliced into 1 1/2” medallions and flattened with a mallet
                  to make the cutlets about the same size, and 1/4-1/8" thin
                  1/3 lb. Tetilla cheese, grated (or Fontina, in a pinch
                  )2 imported canned/bottled pimientos, cut into 1/4” strips
                  flour for dusting
                  2 eggs, lightly beaten
                  1 1/2 cups dry unseasoned bread crumbs
                  salt, pepper
                  1 teaspoon dried oregano
                  3 tablespoons olive oil

                  Match up the cutlets so that two will fit together. Divide the cheese, then the pimiento strips, on top of four “bottom” cutlets, leaving 1/2-inch border. Top with the other halves. Pound the edges lightly to seal. (But don’t get hysterical if they don’t fully adhere. They’ll behave after their little rest.) Dust with flour, dip in the beaten egg, then coat with crumbs that have been seasoned nicely with salt, pepper, and the oregano. Repeat with remaining pairs of cutlets until they’re all used—you’ll have 6-8 stuffed medallions. Let them rest for about 20 minutes.

                  Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium heat and fry the cutlets until golden brown, 2-3 minutes per side.

                  Serve with a pound and a half of baby Yukon Gold potatoes quartered or halved and roasted in goose fat.

                  Yield: 2 ample servings

                  1. g
                    Gastronomos RE: Lila Apr 8, 2004 04:36 PM

                    Pork tenderloin medallions with coriander red wine sauce (reduction).
                    "Afelia"

                    Sauté lightly salted medallions in skillet with some olive oil. Add crushed coriander seeds and red wine. Simmer until reduced. Eat. Enjoy.
                    Adding some of those new potatoes, the little ones, peeled, to a deep fryer until cooked, and adding those to the sauté pan just before the coriander seed and the red wine will give you a dish to DIE for!

                    1. j
                      Janet RE: Lila Apr 8, 2004 06:56 PM

                      We probably eat more pork tenderloin than any other red meat. It's fast and easy. A couple of favorites:

                      Roll a tenderloin in herbs de Provence, sear on top of the stove and finish in the oven. Make a little pan sauce out of the drippings, wine, stock and a smidge of butter or cream. Sometimes it is necessary to wipe out the pan between searing and roasting...if I've seared over too high a temp. Even if it's necessary, there's still nice bits left over for sauce.
                      -------------------------------------------------------
                      Butterfly the tenderloin and pound to an even thickness. Slice mushrooms, mince an onion, and saute in more butter than you think you'll need. Allow to cool slightly. Combine with any crumbled blue cheese and small cubes of fresh white bread (like Monks or P. Farm). Spread stuffing on tenderloin, roll and tie. Sear on top of stove and finish in the oven. No sauce necessary.
                      The main thing about cooking pork tenderloin is to not overcook it. It should be pink when sliced.

                      1. c
                        Catherine RE: Lila Apr 8, 2004 10:37 PM

                        I love pork tenderloin. My favorite recipe is adapted from one I found on epicurious. Salt and pepper the tenderloins, sear to brown on all sides, and place on a roasting pan. Mix up equal parts of creole mustard and olive oil, with a healthy dose of dried thyme, and slather the concoction over the tenderloin. Roast until it reaches the correct temperature (can't remember offhand) and let rest before slicing. Drizzle with a gorgonzola flavored bechamel and serve with asparagus and brabant potatoes. Heavenly!

                        Congratulations on finding a new favorite cut of meat!

                        1. p
                          peg RE: Lila Apr 9, 2004 12:37 AM

                          Trim & butterfly the little rascal. get out a Ziploc bag, and add a nice big glob of jerk paste - I use premade, as one can find many varieties here in the Chicago area, from mild to nuclear-waste strength - and some pineapple juice, with just a touch of veg oil added. If you have any mango or guava nectar, that's good, too. Squish it around, add the t-loin, and let it marinate (the longer it marinates, the hotter it gets). Grill it up over medium-high heat, maybe 5-6 minutes a side - throw in some hickory chips first, as the flavor is a good foil for jerk. Serve with a fruit salsa. I use a mix of pineapple, minced shallot, minced habanero or Thai bird chile to taste, cilantro, and basil.

                          1. e
                            Ellen RE: Lila Apr 9, 2004 02:00 PM

                            This one is real easy and fast: marinate the tenderloin overnight in a good Asian marinade -- either homemade or store bought. Allow to come to room temp before roasting in the oven at 400F for 30 minutes (for an average sized tenderloin). Let sit while you lightly steam/stir fry a goodly amount of chinese snow pea shoots (they're in season now) until wilted in peanut oil with some slivered garlic and freshly ground pepper. (You can use kale or spinach if you can't find snow pea shoots) Place pea shoots on a platter and top with thinly sliced tenderloin. Serve with steamed rice if desired.

                            Sometimes I will buy several tenderloins if I'm at a farmers market or butcher and put each into a ziplock bag and throw them in the freezer so they're already marinated and on hand when I need them.

                            1. j
                              Jo RE: Lila Apr 11, 2004 08:46 AM

                              Chinese BBQ Pork
                              This recipe comes from Yan Can Cook and has been a staple of ours for years. Yum

                              2 Pork Tenderloins, trimmed
                              1 3/4 tablespoons sugar
                              1 1/2 teaspoons salt
                              2 cloves minced garlic
                              1 tablespoon minced ginger
                              1/4 cup catsup
                              1/4 cup soy sauce
                              1 3/4 tablespoons wine
                              1 teaspoon five spice powder

                              1 tablespoon hoisin sauce
                              1/4 cup honey

                              Mix first 8 ingridients and marinate pork 2-4 hours or overnite.

                              Preheat oven to 375 and place pork on rack in roasting pan filled with 1/4 cup water. Bake 15 min and turn over and bake an additional 15-20 minutes. Do not overcook. While pork is baking mix honey and hoisin sauce together for basting sauce. Switch oven to broil and coat one side of pork with basting sauce. Broil one minute till carmelized. Turn and coat other side and repeat broil.

                              Let pork cool slightly and slice. Can be served hot or cold. Freezes well whole

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