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roasting pumpkin seeds

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kerrie Oct 23, 2003 10:55 AM

does anyone have any tips for roasting pumpkin seeds?

will they roast as well the next day? i'm going to a pumpkin carving party and won't get home until late...

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    Tom Steele RE: kerrie Oct 23, 2003 11:07 AM

    I think I've posted this before, but it's been at least a year. I'm not *sure* how well the seeds would keep overnight, but it stands to reason that if they're wrapped tightly in plastic wrap and refrigerated they should be okay. Anyway:

    Toasted Pumpkin Seeds

    Heat oven to 250. Remove seeds from the pumpkin(s) and pull as much of the strands and pulp away from them as you can. Don’t rinse them.

    Toss the seeds with clarified butter, peanut, or canola oil—about a half-cup of fat for every four cups of seeds. Add a nominal amount of kosher salt. Try a bit of thyme, oregano, cumin, coriander, cardamom, and/or cayenne, if you like.

    Line baking sheet(s) with parchment or foil. Spread the seeds in one layer on the sheets. Toast slowly for about an hour, checking them every 10-15 minutes and stirring if they’re browning unevenly.

    Store in tightly sealed containers.

    3 Replies
    1. re: Tom Steele
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      Cathy Elton RE: Tom Steele Oct 23, 2003 11:14 AM

      I don't think you need nearly that much oil. Just a touch will do.

      I've also heard of boiling the seeds for 10 minutes before roasting, but I'm not sure what effect that has.

      1. re: Cathy Elton
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        StriperGuy RE: Cathy Elton Oct 23, 2003 11:18 AM

        I agree, I have toasted pumpkin seeds with no oil at all.

        1. re: StriperGuy
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          jjholmes RE: StriperGuy Oct 23, 2003 12:29 PM

          I spray some vegetable spray onto a pizza pan or cookie sheet lined with foil. Just spread the seeds out as evenly as you can in a single layer and douse with *lots* of coarse salt (most of it shakes off) and roast in very low oven (200-250 degrees), shaking and turning every 30 minutes or so until they are crunchy/crisp - it can take a couple of hours. Some in my family munch them whole and some shell them by biting the pointed tip very delicately with their front teeth which splits the pod open.

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      Pru RE: kerrie Oct 23, 2003 11:29 AM

      I recently bought some pre-roasted pumpkin seeds that were salted. I was just popping them in my mouth and eating the whole thing. But, then I discovered, you could shell it like a sunflower seed. (Yes, I know, I'm a little slow.)

      So, what's the correct way to eat them?

      3 Replies
      1. re: Pru
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        dude RE: Pru Oct 23, 2003 11:50 AM

        Exactly like a sunflower seed.

        1. re: Pru
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          nja RE: Pru Oct 23, 2003 12:05 PM

          It's okay to eat the whole thing though. At least, doing so has never caused any problems for me.

          If you're going to use them as an ingredient in something else (pumpkin bread, mole, etc.) then you should only use the inner part.

          1. re: nja
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            Emma RE: nja Oct 23, 2003 01:34 PM

            I much prefer eating them whole!

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          Torty RE: kerrie Oct 23, 2003 12:54 PM

          I agree on the no oil needed. As for the salting- we have found soaking them for a half hour or so in very salty water gives a nice salty result without the problem of all the salt falling off or being too strong on the tongue

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            malcarne RE: kerrie Oct 23, 2003 02:27 PM

            Timely post. Just yesterday I ruined a batch due to my impatience.
            Always dry them(on parchment paper so they won't stick as bad) after seperating from pulp. I couldn't wait so they steamed and then I upped the heat and they burnt. Blecch. What I do when I want edible pumpkin seeds: seperate from pulp in bowl of water, dry on parchment paper, add a teaspoon or so of olive oil, add dashes of cayenne, kosher salt, cracked black pepper, cumin, allspice, powdered ginger, powdered mustard(mini dash), maybe a few fennel seeds, and last, but not least, a smidgen of brown sugar, place on a cookie sheet, preheat oven to 325, roast for 10-15 minutes.

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              torta basilica RE: kerrie Oct 23, 2003 03:40 PM

              I just picked up some roasted & salted from my Grower's Ranch Market & the seeds were so much bigger/meatier/tastier than ones I've roasted at home or store-bought David's. I wonder if the secret is just bigger seeds to begin with or some other treatment? Will ask the next time I'm there...

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                Irwin Koval RE: kerrie Oct 23, 2003 06:05 PM

                I accumulate the seeds from as many friends. "Pumpkins", as I can. Refrigerate the seeds, until after Holloween. By then i've generally got around 15/20 pounds. Wash them well, spin dry in a Salad Dryer. Then place them on Screen Type Baking Pans one on top of the other, using small empty 6 ounce Tomato Paste Tins, placed on corners of treys to keep in place in oven.

                Use no Salt, since I prefer the Natural Taste, but before seeds cool I spray, from mist bottle lightly with Toasted Seseme Oil. Bake at 225 degree temperature for about 1 1/2 Hour, checking for doneness. When they seem ready I raise Temperature for 5 minutes to 450 degrees to finish. This seems to permit easier opening when dry.

                After they cool I place them into Plastic Bags, sealed. They keep for several months or longer in a cool, dark place.

                The majority of the large, very good tasting Seeds, sold retail actually aren't Pumpkin, if you check the labels they are "Squash Seeds".

                Irwin

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