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Traditional Jewish Brisket Recipe [moved from General Chowhounding board]

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  • galleygirl Sep 22, 2003 12:59 PM
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Yup, my 72 year old Yiddishe Momma has never cooked a brisket....Although I won't be eating it, I'm the know-it-all who's going to tell her how to do it (g)...I've searched thru past posts, and found BBQ brisket recipes, and a few that call for the cans of onion soup, ketchup, and other things that should not be added to brisket. Searching Epicurious, and some Jewish food sources online, yielded a few recipes *I* thought were right, using pounds of onions, braising, and lots of slow cooking, but the thing is, Mom is a weenie. She wants one that her friends have tried, and that means ketchup, onion soups, cranberry sauce, etc.

Mom and Dad, however, revere the opinions, and recipes of the knowledgeable hounds, whose recs have led them to great BBQ, great recs, and great eating...So if one of *you* posts *your* brisket recipe, Mom will consider it vetted by a close friend who can really cook.

Please, help my father's old age hold a wonderful brisket this New Year...Help my mother be the envy of her Mah Jong group, when they smell those delicious smells, and beg for leftovers...

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  1. First of all, make sure you get a piece of brisket with enough fat in it. If you don't, it will be dry.

    I don't like to use flour. I just season it with salt and pepper. Brown it in a pan just large enough to hold the meat flat. If you have the right piece of brisket, you will not need additional fat, and there will be plenty of fat for the next step.

    When the meat is browned, remove it from the pot and add chopped onions (lots) and carrots. Saute these in the fat remaining in the pot (add an extra bit of a type of your persuasion, if necessary) until the onions brown a bit. Put the brisket back in the pot with enough water or broth to come at least halfway up the brisket. Add some peeled garlic cloves and a parsley root if you can find it. Some thyme wouldn't hurt.

    Cover it partly and bring to a boil. IMMEDIATELY turn it down to a simmer and cook until very tender, maybe three hours. Turn it over, using tongs, every so often.

    When it it finished, put it on a plate. If there is too much fat on the broth, skim some off. Use an immersion blender or a food processor to pulverize all the vegetables. This will give the gravy some body. Adjust the seasoning as necessary.

    Pat G.

    7 Replies
    1. re: Pat Goldberg

      I make a brisket very like this, except that I add a bay leaf and about 1/4 cup of black coffee. Pat's right. Getting a good cut is really vital.

      1. re: lucia

        I often put in a bay leaf too. Forgot to mention it.

        Pat G.

        1. re: Pat Goldberg

          But what about the prunes????

          1. re: Nina W.

            Okay...I buy a tzimmes all made with prunes and apricots....I'm no maven when it comes to tzimmes.. If you live in the Boston area the Butcherie in Brookline has so much pre-made..

            1. re: Nina W.

              I really dislike tzimmes.

              1. re: Pat Goldberg

                But how about prunes just cooked with the brisket, and just eventually disintegrated into the gravy? Oh, that sweetness...

                1. re: Nina W.

                  Trouble is, I don't have a sweet tooth. For example, I cannot eat duck with a fruit-based sauce.

                  Pat G.

      2. OK, it's an inexact science but here it goes. This is for a more savory recipe, no fruit or tomato products:

        1 brisket flat, 5-7 lbs.
        2 lbs yellow or Spanish onion
        2 cans Franco-American mushroom gravy.
        1-3 cups water
        1/4 cup sweet wine: use port, Madiera, or Manishevitz Malaga

        later,
        3 lbs baking potatoes, peeled and cut into chunks.

        Preheat oven to 325.
        Slice onions thinly and layer in bottom of roaster to cover. Place brisket on top. Pour gravy over top of brisket. Pour wine over/into gravy. Add water to cover bottom of pan. Cover and put into oven.

        About 2 hours in to cooking, flip meat over so the top is now in the liquid. Cook about 2 more hours.

        Allow meat to cool. Remove from pan and slice (about 1/4 inch) across the grain. Return to pan.

        At this point, brisket can be held in fridge for a few days or frozen.

        Return brisket in covered pan (with all the onions and liquid) to 325 oven. Cook another 1.5 to 2 hours. Add potatoes to pan, scattering and submerging in gravy. Cook another 1.25-1.5 hours and serve.

        This is pretty close to what I grew up on and make myself. Believe it or not, the gravy does taste pretty good after it's all done.

        I will be making it this week, and will post back anything I might've forgotten.

        1 Reply
        1. re: dude

          Brisket and Franco-American....are incompatible, in ANY language, (as I came to the U.S.A. as a displaced person with my husband and a baby, from Poland after world war II .) I and my children and my other family members have been blessed to bake my briskets for many decades . I guess its not bad if my grandchildren keep asking when I will make brisket again!! What more could a grandma want?

        2. I have made a brisket from Bon Appetit that we really liked. (Not exactly what you had in mind, it does have bottled Chili sauce in it :-) ) - I tried Epicurious, but didn't see it:

          1/3 c + 1 TBSP Veg Oil
          2 1/2 lb Onion, thinly sliced
          5 Celery stalks, sliced
          1 1/2 c Chicken broth
          1 12 oz bottle Dark Beer
          1 12 oz bottle Chili Sauce
          2 TBSP Tomato Paste
          1 TBSP chopped Fresh Marjoram
          1 5-lb Flat-Cut Brisket
          1 TBSP Sweet Hungarian Paprika

          325 degrees. Saute onions in 1/3 c oil until very dark. Transfer to large roasting pan. Add 1 TBSP Oil to used pot and saute celery until brown. Add broth to deglaze. Add beer, Chili sauce, tomato paste and Marjoram. Salt/pepper/paprika brisket. Place atop onions, fat side up. Pour sauce over. Cover with foil and roast until tender (close to 4 hours). Let stand one hour room temperature (can be made ahead to this point).

          350 degrees. Spoon off excess fat from brisket and sauce. Thinly slice brisket across grain and arrange in 13 x 9 glass baking dish. Bring sauce to boil in saucepan and spoon over brisket. Cover loosely with foil and rewarm to heat through (about 40 minutes).

          -Cathy

          4 Replies
          1. re: mirage

            Do you really add a whole 12 oz bottle of chili sauce?

            1. re: David Kahn

              No typo. It does sound like a lot - but I did re-check the recipe. It says, and I use, 12 oz. :-)
              -Cathy

              1. re: David Kahn

                They are calling for the mild type of chili sauce you buy next to the ketchup in the grocery store -- sort of like ketchup with a little chili flake action (Bennets or Heinz brands). I think you are thinking of something like Texas Pete, which isn't the same thing. That would be awful!

                1. re: Terrie

                  Ah ha. I was indeed imagining adding 12 oz. of habanero pepper sauce, which certainly would not produce the type of brisket my grandmother used to make. (In fact, I think the primary ingredient in her recipe was Lipton instant onion soup mix.)

            2. No matter which recipe you use - my suggestion is to cook it the day before serving, chill and slice it (against the grain). You can then remove any fat that has congealed in the gravy. Then, reheat before serving. All dishes of this sort only improve by preparing a day or two in advance. Happy New Year!

              1. My favorite brisket recipes call for shredding the meat, instead of slicing it... so here goes!

                Into a crock pot, place one brisket (usually around 5 lbs in size) that has been rubbed with seasoning salt, ground pepper, fresh chopped garlic and Worchestershire sauce. Cover with thickly sliced onions. Put lid on crock pot, and turn on low for about 10 hours. Remove fat from brisket and shred with a fork into large chunks. Serve with au jus from pan.

                1. My absolute favorite brisket recipe is not traditional: I braise it, 12 hours covered at 250 degrees, in a mole sauce. The sauce becomes intensely beefy, and there is usually enough extra that I freeze it and use it as an instant mole for chicken, etc.

                  That said, my mother would cover in onions,carrots, and a little water (plus bay leaf, salt, pepper, etc.), braise it, then chill, defat, and slice. The gravy, onion, and carrots would go into a blender for a really rich sauce. Can't give you exact measurements, it is apparently forbidden (see page 273 of the Talmud).

                  1. Over the years I've done briskets many ways, including a recipe from a Kosher butcher in Ohio that used a can of non-diet Coke (so help me)...Since it's just as easy to make one as two..I have two to make...one for the freezer and one to sit in the refrigerator for a day or so...and then slice and reheat

                    I line a very large roasting pan with heavy duty aluminum foil with it hanging over the edge. I add pan...sliced spanish onions, carrots, celery, garlic, parsley. Lay the brisket in, pour over a little red wine, catsup or tomato sauce (don't see why chili sauce woudn't work).. a small tin of beef broth...top with another layer of heavy duty alumin. foil and seal tightly...bake in the oven until tender...atleast three to four hours.. When I make two I put one directly with the pan without opening the alum. foil directly into the freezer. Meanwhile I'm making a huge stock pot of chicken soup, boiling eggs for chopped liver and bolling noodles for a fruit kugel.. The secret seems to be in the long and slow cooking....

                    1. Okay...from my Yiddishe Momme to yours...prepare to be shocked.

                      Take a heavy pot, put in in one packet of Knorr's Oxtail Soup mix. Beware - they call it tomato soup now and Oxtail is in parentheses. Add two cups of water, dissolve the soup mix (the flame is on at this point)). Then add about a 4-lb brisket - who cares which side is up. Bring it to a boil, cover it, turn the flame down, and simmer it for about an hour. During the last 20 minutes, add a box of dried pitted prunes. If you don't want to make tsimmes, just leave the prunes in there and they'll disintegrate as the brisket cooks some more and become part of the delectable gravy. By the way, this is easily made ahead of time, even frozen, and then reheated - it's even better then.

                      Okay so let's say you want to make tsimmes. Take the prunes out after that 20 minutes, when they're soft. Add cooked sliced carrots, garlic powder, and honey. You got your tsimmes.

                      For you, GG, a veggie tsimmes: Cook some barley until it's soft. Soak the dried prunes in hot water until they're soft, then mix together the cooked barley, the soaked soft prunes, and cooked sliced carrots. Add a healthy tablespoon of fake chicken soup mix (Osem or Elite are the best brands for this). Add some garlic powder and some Nyafat.

                      Geshmack!!!!! This brisket is outta this world. My Mom made hers a few days ago and I happened to be there and had a piece for breakfast. It was all I could do not to eat the whole pot and not allow her to freeze it and wait until Friday...

                      1 Reply
                      1. re: Nina W.

                        Love prunes with brisket. I also do this with Guinness as a braising liquid, though that's not what your mom is looking for I suspect. ; )

                      2. Talmud Schmalmud. Not one person said to SEAR it on both sides before adding vegetables. And sweet potatoes. Put in sweet potatoes.

                        1. I have several brisket recipes I like--I've linked one of Joan Nathan's below. Be forewarned--it does use "cancer in a bottle" (aka liquid smoke). Two other favorites: Bruce Aidells'--can't find link but my copy is from Food and Wine December 2000. If you email me I'll fax to you. Hag Sameach! (And sorry I missed you at lunch Saturday).

                          Link: http://www.jweekly.com/content/2-0-/m...

                          1. I like to keep it simple - the recipe is from Junior's cookbook and it's easy (but not quick). Just salt and pepper the meat, then braise with carrots and garlic - low temp for a long time (3-4 hours at 300). They say to use an open pan with the water 1/2 way up, and baste often - the result is tender and juicy, but has a roasted flavor.

                            Make gravy from some of the remaining water/drippings. I make a roux gravy adding some more garlic in the process.

                            1. Well, this may not be what you want, but I think it's right up your mom's alley. Take a 5-lb. brisket, first cut, mix 1 bottle chili sauce (Heinz, etc.), 1 can coke, and 1 envelope onion soup mix, mix liquid and dry ingredients well. Baste brisket with 1/2 of the sauce. Place in a 250 degree oven and roast 2 hours, covered. Add remaing sauce and roast another one hour, uncovered. Let sit in fridge overnight and reheat with a little water or broth, degrease if necessary. This is delicious and always gets raves. (P.S. - My Mom was Jewish, but couldn't cook for the life of her.)

                              1. By reading your post, and seeing what your wishing for i'd like to suggest that in order to be one up, in comparision to every other Brisket they've ever eaten please consider the recipe I previously posted on the board for Pam, who had a very positive response after preparing ther brisket. Ony difference between my recommendations for her recipe iand your will be in the seasoning.

                                Add 8/10 whole cloves of Garlic
                                Black Pepper, Some Kosher Salt only lightly on the fat top of Brisket.
                                Cut up 5 Stalks of Celery with the Leafs into 2 inch pieces
                                1/2 Bunch Flat Leafed Parsly, Chopped
                                1/2 Bunch Dill Chopped
                                2 Large or 3 medium Onions diced
                                3 Large Carrots, split into 2 inch pieces
                                1 6 oz. tin, tomato paste
                                2 cups red wine
                                2 cups beef or chicken broth

                                For the cooking and preperation follow the receipe on the link below. Your Sauce will be correct if you've incorperated the seasoning I suggested. Any questions email me. Irwin

                                Link: http://www.chowhound.com/topics/show/...

                                1. I'm plotzing here. Ketchup? Cans of soup? OY!! I make brisket for potlucks and people walk around whispering "who made the brisket?". There are never leftovers. I'm not allowed to family holiday dinners without bringing the brisket. That said...

                                  Buy a WHOLE brisket, first and second cut. The second cut is full of fat and flavor. I ask the butcher to trim the fat, and bring it home.

                                  In a large dutch oven render the fat. Salt and pepper brisket and brown quickly on both sides. Pull the brisket out and saute onions and garlic in the fat until onions lightly browned. Use approximately 1 medium to large onion per pound of meat. The more onions, the more gravy. About 1/2 to 2/3 of a head of garlic.

                                  Return the meat to the pot, add water so that meat is about 2/3 covered. Add lots of paprika. Bring to a boil on top of the stove, then put in 350 oven. DO NOT COVER. Turn meat every 45 mins. until it is tender (a fork should go easily through the 1st cut). Start checking around 2 1/2 hrs.

                                  Take meat out of pot and let it cool before slicing (against the grain). Put the pot back on the stove and boil the onions and juices on a low flame, stirring and scraping the sides. You want to get all the liquid out. The onions get black and thick. Slowly add water to this mixture and you will have the most luscious gravy.

                                  Keeping it's original shape, return meat to gravy, cover, warm on very low heat on the stove for 20 mins.

                                  It tastes better the 2nd day.

                                  1. It seems that you're looking for a recipe that's similar to this one from my friend, Elaine Radis -- cranberry sauce, onion soup mix, ketchup, etc. Here's the recipe:

                                    Elaine's Brisket

                                    6 pound beef brisket
                                    1 can whole cranberry sauce
                                    1 package dry onion soup
                                    1/2 cup ketchup
                                    ginger ale, halfway up pot

                                    Put a beef brisket in a heavy roaster pan without lid and sear on high heat using oven set at 450 degrees F. Turn after about 15 minutes.

                                    Pour whole cranberry sauce, dry onion soup mix, and ketchup over the meat. Pour ginger ale halfway up pot. (Don't cover meat completely.)

                                    Cover pan with lid or foil and bake at 350 F. for 2-1/2 hours covered.

                                    It is easy and a NO~FAIL recipe. You can slice the meat and put it back in the gravy (I think it tastes better if you cool the brisket, slice and reheat it in the gravy the next day.) This freezes beautifully.

                                    Don't forget, brisket is ALWAYS sliced across the grain on a diagonal.

                                    Serves 6-8

                                    Source: Elaine Radis

                                    1. I have always been happy with the brisket recipe from "The New Basics Cookbook" by Lukins and Rosso (I know) which is from Nach Waxman of Kitchen Arts and Letters in NYC.

                                      Here it is (instructions paraphrased)

                                      1 first cut brisket (5 - 6#)
                                      1 -2 tsp flour
                                      pepper
                                      1/4 cup corn oil
                                      8 onions, slice thickly and seperate into rings
                                      2 Tbl. tomato paste
                                      1 1/2 tsp. Kosher salt
                                      pepper
                                      2 cloves garlic, quartered
                                      1 carrot, peeled

                                      Dust the brisket with the flour and sprinkle with the pepper. Heat the corn oil in a large ovenproof casserole and sear the brisket on both sides. Remove it to a platter and add the onions to the casserole. Saute them until they are a deep brown color, 10 to 15 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat and place the brisket, fat side up, on top of the onions. Add any juices that have collected on the platter. Use a spatula to coat the top of the brisket with the tomato paste and then season with salt and pepper. Stick the garlic and carrot in the onions. Cover the pan tightly (I use foil and the lid), and bake on the middle rack of a preheated 375 degree oven for 1 1/2 hours. Remove the brisket and slice it 1/8 - 1/4" thick. Put it back in the pan, in its original shape but slightly fanned out, add a few spoonfuls of water if it looks like the onions are about to burn, recover the pan, and cook until fork tender and brown on top, 1 3/4 - 2 hours more.

                                      I use a whole brisket, since it is no more work than doing a half, although it does take longer to cook. It gives me some to freeze for a later meal. Also, the second cut is fattier, which makes a better sauce.

                                      For Passover I have omitted the flour with no ill effects.

                                      I use some of the fat from the brisket, that I trim off and render instead of corn oil.

                                      I use more onions than called for, up to 1 pound per pound of meat. I sprinkle them generously with sweet Hungarian paprika while sauteeing them.

                                      This is something that definitely is better the next day, and you can then remove the excess fat.

                                      After the brisket is cooked I remove it from the pan and deglaze with water or broth until the gravy is the consistency I want. You could also push the solids through a sieve at this point for a smoother sauce.

                                      1. I have always been happy with the brisket recipe from "The New Basics Cookbook" by Lukins and Rosso (I know) which is from Nach Waxman of Kitchen Arts and Letters in NYC.

                                        Here it is (instructions paraphrased)

                                        1 first cut brisket (5 - 6#)
                                        1 -2 tsp flour
                                        pepper
                                        1/4 cup corn oil
                                        8 onions, slice thickly and seperate into rings
                                        2 Tbl. tomato paste
                                        1 1/2 tsp. Kosher salt
                                        pepper
                                        2 cloves garlic, quartered
                                        1 carrot, peeled

                                        Dust the brisket with the flour and sprinkle with the pepper. Heat the corn oil in a large ovenproof casserole and sear the brisket on both sides. Remove it to a platter and add the onions to the casserole. Saute them until they are a deep brown color, 10 to 15 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat and place the brisket, fat side up, on top of the onions. Add any juices that have collected on the platter. Use a spatula to coat the top of the brisket with the tomato paste and then season with salt and pepper. Stick the garlic and carrot in the onions. Cover the pan tightly (I use foil and the lid), and bake on the middle rack of a preheated 375 degree oven for 1 1/2 hours. Remove the brisket and slice it 1/8 - 1/4" thick. Put it back in the pan, in its original shape but slightly fanned out, add a few spoonfuls of water if it looks like the onions are about to burn, recover the pan, and cook until fork tender and brown on top, 1 3/4 - 2 hours more.

                                        I use a whole brisket, since it is no more work than doing a half, although it does take longer to cook. It gives me some to freeze for a later meal. Also, the second cut is fattier, which makes a better sauce.

                                        For Passover I have omitted the flour with no ill effects.

                                        I use some of the fat from the brisket, that I trim off and render instead of corn oil.

                                        I use more onions than called for, up to 1 pound per pound of meat. I sprinkle them generously with sweet Hungarian paprika while sauteeing them.

                                        This is something that definitely is better the next day, and you can then remove the excess fat.

                                        After the brisket is cooked I remove it from the pan and deglaze with water or broth until the gravy is the consistency I want. You could also push the solids through a sieve at this point for a smoother sauce.

                                        1. This is my version of my mother's recipe which is simmering in an 80 gallon steam jacket kettle, here at The Standard Club of Chicago as a write this post. The quarter inch fat cap gives us just the right amount of richness, with little trimming necessary before slicing.

                                          400# first cut brisket with 1/4 inch fat cap
                                          2 each 5 gal boxes Coca Cola syrup
                                          2 cases Liptons onion soup mix, retail pack
                                          2 #10 cans ketchup
                                          50# sliced yellow onion
                                          24 oz chopped garlic
                                          3 qts strong dijon mustard
                                          2# paprika
                                          chicken stock to cover (about 20 gallons)

                                          1. Bring to a boil and turn down to a strong simmer

                                          2. When the meat is fork tender, remove from liquid
                                          and chill until needed

                                          3. Reduce cooking liquid to a glace, skimming as
                                          necessary

                                          4. Slice and reheat gently in a low oven with a little
                                          stock or the reduced cooking liquid.

                                          1. So, I'm hanging my head with shame here...First, a belated "Thank you" to everyone who poured out the recipes near and dear to their hearts....A heartfelt "whoops!", because in my initial query, it sounds like I'm *looking* for the cranberry-sauce, ketchup-onion soup recipe, which my mother already had...I was looking for a "gedempte" type recipe, the savory kind drowned in onions that my paternal grandmother made (the *only* thing, I may add, I've ever missed in my years of non-carnivorousness).

                                            So, the shame part comes from the fact that, despite all the great recipes, which I printed for Mom, who swears she will be daring next time, she made the cranberry sauce thing (like the one Nancy posted)!!!! In all honesty, I tried a potato and a carrot that cooked in it, and it wasn't bad...In fact, despite all the chazzeri in it, it basically tasted like tsimmes cooked with meat, the shortcut version of Nina's prune version. Nothing like cranberries, but why wouldn't you just do the prunes, and other dried fruits? Oh right, prunes are scarey..(g) My father had thirds, tho, so I guess it was a success. If she had said there were prunes in it, he probably wouldn't have eaten it!

                                            I have made her swear that the next time, she would do the savory thing, thanks to Pat's explicit directions; that was just what I had in mind...I KNOW that's the way my granma did it.....

                                            1. This is a brisket recipe which will be your forever "go to" recipe.
                                              Season both sides heavily with garlic powder, onion powder and paprika. Poke holes with long tined fork for flavors to permeate meat. Wrap in plastic wrap overnight.
                                              When ready to cook, saute 2-3 very large sliced or diced onions in some oil...when they are brown, push to the side and begin searing brisket...being careful not to burn spices...add a little more oil if necessary. Brown on both sides. THen pour in 1 cup of good red wine (use the wine you are drinking!) and 1 cup of beef broth. Cover tightly with heavy duty foil or lid and place in 325 degree oven for 21/2-3 hours, turning mid way. Add sliced mushrooms (I use a combination of wild mushrooms) last half hour, if desired. Cool, slice and enjoy...it's great!

                                              1. Oy. A lot of Chazerai for what my grandmother typically made very simple and excellent It's going to sound odd, but it's easy and great. No carrots, paprika, searing, etc, etc.

                                                1 4-5 lb brisket - first/flat cut
                                                1 can jellied cranberry sauce (yep, that kind)
                                                1 14 oz bottle ketchup (the entire bottle)
                                                1 14 oz can low- or no-sodium beef stock
                                                garlic powder (or crushed garlic)
                                                onion powder
                                                Kosher salt & pepper

                                                So don't go nuts with the meat. You don't need to sear it, marinate it or otherwise futz with it. Just season it simply. I sometimes rub it with a little crushed garlic/Kosher salt paste, but you can use salt, pepper, garlic powder and onion powder. My grandmother actually used powdered ginger. Go crazy.

                                                Mix the cranberry, ketchup and beef stock in a pan over medium heat until well blended. If using low sodium stock, you may want to season the sauce to taste. Slice up the onions into rings. Fill the bottom of your roasting pan with the raw onion rings. Lay the brisket, fat side up, on top. And fill the pan with the stock/sauce mixture until it comes up to the sides of the brisket. If it doesn't fill the pan, get a smaller pan.

                                                Slow cook covered at 325 for 3 to 3 1/2 hours. My grandmother would make it the day before. She'd let it cool so you could more easily cut reasonably thin slices of the brisket on the bias - if you try to cut it hot, it'll fall apart on you. She'd also chill the sauce and onions and skim the fat from it.

                                                That's it. The rendered onions and sauce are all you need. For Hanukkah, I serve it with Kasha Varnishkas and Latkes. For Passover, I'd just make sure your ingredients are all marked Kosher - and nix the Kasha and Latkes!

                                                1 Reply
                                                1. re: Whoopingcrane

                                                  Here is my very easy recipe for brisket:
                                                  1 large brown n bag
                                                  1 T. flour
                                                  5-6 lb. brisket
                                                  2 envelopes dried onion soup
                                                  water

                                                  Put flour in bag and shake. Place brisket in bag and put in baking pan Put onion soup on top of brisket. Add about 1 1/2 cups water to bag. Make several slits in bag. Put into a preheated 300 degree and cook at least 3 hours. After it is done, let it cool enough so you can handle it. Pour gravy into separate container and chill so you can lift off the fat. Slice brisket and pour gravy over and simmer it on the stove for a while. It will melt in your mouth. Delicious with latke's for Chanukah! I usually make this a day ahead so it can really get chilled which makes for easier slicing.

                                                2. Just read through all the previous posts to make sure I wasn't going to duplicate... not sure of the origins of this recipe but it's what my mom's family does.

                                                  Start with a "nice" 4-7 lb brisket.
                                                  Rub both sides with seasoned salt (mom swears by McCormick Season-All in the blue jar) and throw it in a roasting pan, fattier side up.
                                                  Slice two large onions and scatter the pieces on top of the brisket.
                                                  Mix about 1/4 C ketchup with 1 C liquid (more on this in a second) and pour it over the onions.
                                                  Seal tightly with foil. Bake at 325 for about 1 hour per pound. As others have noted, it's better the next day.

                                                  Note: The "official" family liquid is a mix of approximately equal parts red wine and water. I've also used white wine and water, beer and water, and just plain water. Anything but just plain water works well.

                                                  1 Reply
                                                  1. re: truman

                                                    It was mentioned, but our favorite version of the "family liquid" is part Manischewitz concord grape wine. I know, Manischewitz makes the gourmets and wine connoisseur cringe, but this is one of the legitimate ways to use Manischewitz. The sweetness reduces nicely for a holiday brisket. It's nothing to be ashamed of ...

                                                    Here's a brisket recipe we've been making in our family for many memorable Jewish holiday meals ... http://familyrecipecentral.com/recipe...

                                                  2. I enjoyed reading all these versions.

                                                    This is mine, have made it many times. I always cook it the day before to get the fat off, and make perfect thin slices with my electric knife.

                                                    1 (4- to 5-pound) brisket

                                                    2 (1-ounce) packets onion soup mix
                                                    1 1/2 cups chile sauce

                                                    6 cloves garlic

                                                    1 1/2 pounds carrots

                                                    1. Heat the oven to 350 degrees. Place the meat fat-side up in a large Dutch oven. Sprinkle the onion soup mix over the meat. Cover with the chile sauce and 2 cups of water, or more if needed to almost cover the meat. Crush the garlic cloves and add to the liquid.

                                                    2. Cover the pan and cook for 4 hours. Let the brisket cool for about 45 minutes and refrigerate overnight. Then skim the fat off the meat.

                                                    3. About 1 1/2 hours before you wish to serve the brisket, heat the oven to 350 degrees. Remove the brisket to a cutting board and slice it thinly across the grain. Trim, peel and cut the carrots into one-half-inch-by-2-inch sticks. Cook the brisket and carrots covered for 1 hour, until the brisket is heated through and the carrots are fork tender. (Alternatively, the brisket can be completed the same day: While the brisket is cooling for 45 minutes, trim, peel and cut the carrots into one-half-inch-by-2-inch sticks. Remove the brisket and slice it thinly across the grain. Skim the fat off the top of the liquid, add the sliced brisket back to the pan with the carrots, cover and bake at 350 degrees for 1 more hour, or until carrots are fork tender.) Serve on a platter.

                                                    Each of 10 servings: 346 calories; 44 grams protein; 18 grams carbohydrates; 4 grams fiber; 9 grams fat; 3 grams saturated fat; 87 mg. cholesterol; 1,173 mg. sodium.