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freezing ravioli made with wonton wrappers

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Wildly underestimated how much filling (ricotta/mushroom/mozzerella) to prepare for a meal or two and now have SEVERAL cookie sheets of these things sitting in the refrigerator to firm up before cooking about a quarter of them. How should I freeze the rest in order to avoid them sticking together when I try to cook them over the next FEW weeks?

Also, the wonton package says cook for three or four minutes, but I have egg in there and that doesn't seem long enough to me. Other recipes I've looked at say eight minutes. Views?

Help much appreciated.

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  1. c
    Caitlin McGrath

    Put the cookie sheets in the freezer (or if you don't have space, carefully transfer ravioli to pans or plates that will fit, keeping them in a single layer). Freeze until the ravioli are solidly frozen, then transfer to container or freezer bag. In general, this is the way to keep small things (berries, scoops of cookie dough, turnovers, waffles) from sticking together when stored frozen.

    Many fresh ravioli, etc., only cook for 3-5 minutes, or the pasta starts to fall apart. Each is a small package, so cooking in boiling water for a few minutes will definitely cook the egg component through. The real issue is how long it takes to cook the dough without overcooking, and as with straight pasta, you'll have to test it to find out.

    2 Replies
    1. re: Caitlin McGrath

      The only thing I can add to this is to note that the ravioli can sometimes freeze to the cookie sheets. I have sprinkled some semolina on the cookie sheets before putting the ravioli on them in the freezer to help prevent this, or I guess you could slightly warm the cookie sheet to remove the stuck ravioli.

      1. re: rjka

        Have the little devils in the freezer on waxed paper on the cookie sheets. Should be OK.

    2. That was suppossed to be OVERESTIMATED, LOL.

      1. I make tons of wontons and freeze them for quick snacks. I've found that the best way to freeze them is to put them in single layers in freezer ziplock bags. I could get 16 to 20 wontons per bag. Put these bags in the freezer on any flat surface, all over the freezer in my case since I need to stack them on top of ice cream cartons, etc. Once they are hard, you can stack them carefully and put them in a container. I reboil them in this frozen state and they are fine. In terms of how long to boil, I have been taught to note that cooked raviolis and wontons float. Because I like my skins a little softer, I let them boil a little longer. Be sure to use a soft boil. My kids like them really al dente so they fish them out after a minute of floating. Since I also boil my wontons from a frozen state, I like to boil them a little longer, maybe 2/3 minutes after they float. The key to whether they're cooked is when they float. I do have one concern about the ravioli fillings that you used. I am wondering how well the egg and cheese freeze. I hope I've not ramble too long...I am recovering from a very long lunch at Kingfish in San Mateo...Margret

        1 Reply
        1. re: Margret
          c
          Caitlin McGrath

          Cheese ravioli freeze very well. I generally prefer to cook ravioli and wontons from the frozen state, because they hold together better than freshly-made or just refrigerated ones. They're a great "convenience" food to have around.

        2. Four minutes was the right amount of time to cook raviolis. They were really good! Delighted to have several ravioli meals made ahead and successfully frozen. Thanks all for the help! Now thinking something Asian with wonton wrappers....

          1 Reply
          1. re: Coyote

            Try:

            Napa cabbage with coarse ground or chopped pork shoulder

            or

            Chinese chives with diced shrimp

          2. I have been freezing won ton for years, but the thin skins crack when frozen. Now I cook them first, coat with salad oil and freeze (I have a shrink wrapper). Works great.